Petty Officer Takes Marines to the Fight aboard U.S. Navy Warship

LinkedIn
Petty Officer Kevin Taylor aboard Navy warship

Petty Officer 3rd Class Kevin Taylor, a native of La Habra, California, was inspired to join the Navy to follow in family members’ footsteps. “My dad, the majority of my uncles and my grandfather all served in the military,” Taylor said.

Now, three years later, Taylor serves aboard one of the Navy’s amphibious ships at Naval Base San Diego.

“For the most part it’s really nice,” Taylor said. “It’s nice to be able to rely on shipmates for help and to help them as well.”

Taylor, a 2016 graduate of La Habra High School, is a interior communications electrician aboard USS Essex, one of four Wasp-class amphibious assault ships in the Navy, homeported in San Diego.

“We do the electrical work for the alarms,” Taylor said. “We maintain all shipboard alarms, warning and indicating systems and certain flight systems.”

Taylor credits success in the Navy to many of the lessons learned in La Habra.

“I learned that nothing comes easy,” said Taylor.

Essex is designed to deliver U.S. Marines and their equipment where they are needed to support a variety of missions ranging from amphibious assaults to humanitarian relief efforts. Designed to be versatile, the ship has the option of simultaneously using helicopters, Harrier jets, and Landing Craft Air Cushioned (LCAC), as well as conventional landing craft and assault vehicles in various combinations.

Because of their inherent capabilities, these ships have been and will continue to be called upon to support humanitarian and other contingency missions on short notice.

Sailors’ jobs are highly varied aboard Essex. More than 1,000 men and women make up the ship’s crew, which keeps all parts of the ship running smoothly, from handling weaponry to maintaining the engines. An additional 1,200 Marines can be embarked.

“Serving with the Marines gives you a different aspect of the military and seeing how different branches operate versus the Navy,” said Taylor.

Serving in the Navy means Taylor is part of a world that is taking on new importance in America’s focus on rebuilding military readiness, strengthening alliances and reforming business practices in support of the National Defense Strategy.

A key element of the Navy the nation needs is tied to the fact that America is a maritime nation, and that the nation’s prosperity is tied to the ability to operate freely on the world’s oceans. More than 70 percent of the Earth’s surface is covered by water; 80 percent of the world’s population lives close to a coast; and 90 percent of all global trade by volume travels by sea.

“Our priorities center on people, capabilities and processes, and will be achieved by our focus on speed, value, results and partnerships,” said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. “Readiness, lethality and modernization are the requirements driving these priorities.”

Though there are many ways for sailors to earn distinction in their command, community, and career, Taylor is most proud of being selected as Junior Sailor of the Quarter and being promoted to third class petty officer.

“It’s something that you have to work for, to study and learn and to always be accepting of constructive criticism,” said Taylor.

As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied upon assets, Taylor and other sailors know they are part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes contributing to the Navy the nation needs.

“Serving in the Navy is a sense of pride knowing that you’re doing something for the country and giving back to people,” said Taylor.

Source: Navy Office of Community Outreach

Sailor of the Day!

LinkedIn
U.S. Navy Aviation Structural Mechanic Airman Lesley Carrasco, from Anaheim, California, poses for a photograph as the Sailor of the Day with Capt. Randy Peck, right, commanding officer of the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), and Command Master Chief Marc Puco in the Atlantic Ocean, Nov. 8, 2019. The John C. Stennis is underway conducting routine operations in support of Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic

U.S. Navy Aviation Structural Mechanic Airman Lesley Carrasco, from Anaheim, California, poses for a photograph as the Sailor of the Day with Capt. Randy Peck, right, commanding officer of the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), and Command Master Chief Marc Puco in the Atlantic Ocean, Nov. 8, 2019.

The John C. Stennis is underway conducting routine operations in support of Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic.

U.S. Navy photo illustration by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Thomas R. Pittman.

Source: outreach.navy.mil/

About The Navy Office of Community Outreach
The Navy Office of Community Outreach (NAVCO) connects Americans with their Navy. With most of the Navy’s personnel and equipment logically concentrated on America’s coasts, NAVCO oversees a number of community outreach programs designed to bring America’s Navy to cities throughout the country which do not enjoy a significant Navy presence.

Jimmy Fallon surprises military veteran with $50K in heartwarming video

LinkedIn
Jimmy Fallon hugs military souse on the Tonight Show

To mark Veteran’s Day, Jimmy Fallon had a couple of announcements in store. The first was that The Tonight Show would be donating $150,000 to Fisher House Foundation, a charity that “provides housing for families of military and veterans while their loved one is receiving treatment.”

The second surprise, meanwhile, was even closer to home.

“Our friends at The Home Depot Foundation started a brand new contest this year called Operation Surprise, where people all across the country get to nominate a U.S. military veteran in need, and the winner gets $25,000 to go towards critical home repairs,” explains Fallon in the clip above.

“It’s a great thing, and I’m happy to say that the winner of this year’s Operation Surprise contest is here with us tonight.”

Just watch the face of the winner — a veteran of the Air Force — as her name is called out.

 

Continue on to Mashable to read the complete article

10 Skills to Master for a Successful Job Search

LinkedIn
man dressed in a suit with several other professionals in the background

As a service member, you’ve already got a strong skill set to make you an asset in the workplace. Many of those same skills can be applied in finding the right job in the first place.

Here are ten skills to master when searching and interviewing for a position:

  1. Flexibility—In today’s market, it’s important to show that you are willing to adjust your schedule or expectations to the demands of a job and compromise to get a task done.
  1. Technical literacy—These days, most jobs require some basic computer and tech knowledge. Knowing how to put together a spreadsheet or quick presentation will do wonders for your resume. If you feel like you need to bring your skills up to speed, explore learning opportunities around you—for example, courses at your community college, online training from MySECO and resources at the MWR Digital Library.
  1. Communication skills—It’s essential that you speak and write effectively in the workplace. Therefore, your communication during an interview is extremely important. Be prepared for questions, and most importantly, listen attentively to your interviewer.
  1. Multitasking abilities—Employers use keywords like “fast-paced” and “deadline-driven” because they are looking for employees who can multitask with ease. You’ll want to demonstrate to an employer that you can manage a variety of tasks at the same time, with limited supervision.
  1. Creativity—Even if the job you’re after is not in a creative field, remember that an employer wants to hire someone who offers a fresh perspective. The creative solution that you bring to a job could potentially expedite an employer’s process or improve a service offered, making you a more appealing potential hire.
  1. Problem-solving skills—Every company has problems that need to be solved, and that’s where an employee like you comes in. You’ll need to be able to analyze a problem and then use critical thinking to solve it. A fantastic way to highlight your skills during a job interview is to provide examples of problems you’ve effectively solved.

 

  1. Interpersonal abilities—Almost every job out there requires you to work with people so employers want to be sure that you can play nicely with others. During an interview, highlight your excellent teamwork skills, perhaps by relaying a time when you helped to alleviate a team conflict.

 

  1. Strong work ethic—Employers love employees who show up on time or even early. They appreciate those who are willing to go the extra mile. If you do excellent work and consider yourself productive, highlight that fact, especially if you have examples of times when you went above and beyond what was expected of you.
  1. Organizational skills—There’s simply no better time to demonstrate these skills than during a job interview. Come with extra copies of your resume, cover letter, job application, portfolio of past work and business cards. Be sure to proofread all your documents. Show up early and prepared with answers to common interview questions. Do a little research and come up with a few questions for your potential employer.
  1. Self-confidence—When it comes down to it, a job interview is an opportunity to sell yourself. Do whatever you need to do to boost your confidence and present yourself professionally: dress nicely and appropriately, be prompt, make eye contact, and be personable. The best way to make an employer believe in you is to believe in yourself.

As you search for a job, it’s crucial for you to identify your transferable skills, incorporate them into your resume, and highlight them in your job interview. As a service member, you have all the skills on this list and more. You just have to demonstrate those assets to a future employer.

Source: militaryonesource.mil

Sailor uses laser range finder aboard USS John P. Murtha

LinkedIn
Alejandra Murillo users laser USS John P. Murtha

Lt.j.g. Alejandra Murillo, from Huntington Beach, Calif., uses a laser range finder on the forecastle of the amphibious transport dock ship USS John P. Murtha (LPD 26) as the ship arrives in Okinawa, Japan.

The John P. Murtha is currently on its first deployment and part of the Boxer Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) and 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) team and is deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations to support regional stability, reassure partners and allies, and maintain a presence postured to respond to any crisis ranging from humanitarian assistance to contingency operations.

(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kyle Carlstrom)

Source: Navy Office of Community Outreach

7 Steps to Finding a Job: Advice from a CEO

LinkedIn
close-up hand business man yping keyboard laptop

Finding a Job and getting employed is not rocket science. Just follow this advice from a CEO and you will get multiple invitations for interviews with the companies for which you apply.

I have been reading resumes for 46 years. I have hired hundreds of people. I have helped tens of thousands to get jobs. I focus entirely on assisting U.S. Veterans; however, this article will help any job seeker get a job faster.

Finding a way to support yourself and your family is not as difficult as it may seem, if you do it the right way. It is a multi-pronged offense and attack. You must use all of these tactics.

First: You must have confidence in yourself. You must believe that you can do the job you for which you are applying. The people who hire personnel have talked to thousands of applicants. They are very astute at reading people. You are probably not going to fool them. Do not apply for jobs that you are not qualified for and that you cannot do to the company’s complete satisfaction. It will not work out well for you or for them.

Second: Write a short, confident and intriguing cover letter, and include it with your resume. This is a brief summary of why you are the perfect candidate for their job opening. Make them want to read your resume. Include the title of the job and a few of the keywords the company has used in their job description.

Third: This is essential! When you send a resume to apply for a specific job, use the qualifications and experience listed in their job posting for reference when writing. Use their key descriptive words in your resume. (Ask yourself this question: When the person posted this job, which words in their job description did they choose as the “keywords” for their computer to look for to send them only qualified candidates. (Most resumes are read first by a computer that chooses resumes to be seen, based on their use of the keywords in the job description. The others are deleted.) Most companies do this now to save time. All that companies are looking for is a brief and honest response that proves that you meet their job guidelines, in order to fill their positions ASAP.
Too many, in fact, most applicants, send in a general resume. They have not included any of the information that the company needs to decide about whether they are qualified. They have not responded specifically to any of the list of qualifications and experience included in the job description. And they have not added any of the keywords listed in their employment ad. You will not be hired if you do the same. You will be like all the other frustrated job seekers.

*Note: do not apply for jobs using the same resume! The best way to conquer your objective is to use a bullet, not a shotgun. Snipers are sent for specific objectives. “Street-Sweepers” are for crowds. Hence, when applying for specific jobs, use a bullet to bring down your objective.

Fourth: If you were in the U.S. Military, do not make a long list of what you did in the DoD, without explaining how that makes you qualified for their open position. (Saying that you were an 0311 Infantry Rifleman will not get you any jobs. Such descriptions cannot be understood or translated by civilians. Perhaps if you said “0311 Infantry: Trained to use various sophisticated equipment and electronics in multiple situations as needed. Experienced in communications and in filling reports. Trained to assume leadership immediately when necessary. …”  (Note*: Most first readers of your resume will be non-veterans and be in their early 20s. They will not be the decision maker. They are probably not a US veteran and cannot make any sense of what your military responsibilities were and how they relate to the job they need to fill, unless you explain it in words they understand and can apply to the job they must fill.)

Fifth: Use LinkedIn. This is the Number One worldwide space for companies, employers, employees, and serious job seekers. Create a profile. Fill it out completely. Join 50 relevant groups. Follow some of the leaders in your industry and join some of the groups to which they belong. Follow companies for which you want to work. Connect with executives and employees in those companies. (Use the Search bar to do all this.) Read the posts that they make, like them and make a comment. Also, write and post articles and send them to your groups. Make your self known. Build relationships.

The connections you make on LinkedIn can be extremely valuable in putting you on the top of the list of candidates a company will consider. If you can get a recommendation from an executive or an employee of a company, it helps tremendously.

LinkedIn is also an online space that virtually every recruiter in the world has joined and uses to find job seekers to fill every job opening they acquire.

Take the time to watch all the videos that LinkedIn offers for job seekers. (Click Here.)

Sixth: Use niche job boards. Look for job boards that are exclusive for your experience and industry. If you are a US veteran, go to sites like HirePatriots.com. Post your resume and search for the jobs and the state or city in which you want to find employment. If you find a job you know you can do well, give them a call. HirePatriots will act as your agent and contact the company and recommend you. – There are such niche job boards for every industry. The BIG job boards are becoming obsolete. They are too expensive and less effective for employers to use. And for job seekers, it is like trying to find a needle in a haystack!

Seventh: For those of you that are not shy, here is a sensational way to get seen and noticed: Your local media wants stories about US veterans. They also want a US veteran that can explain what it is like to be in the military, what is learned and gained by being in the US military, and why it is so hard for our military to transition. Write the producer, editor, station manager and some of their reporters. Send a short letter letting them know that you are a U.S. veteran and that you would like to talk on these subjects and educate their listeners. You will get interviews! The News runs out of things to say every 24 hours. By offering them to speak about U.S. veteran issues, you help them fill their News time slots. During your live interview, give a brief resume of your own experience and mention that you are currently looking for employment. This will work with civilians too, if you give them a story their audience wants to hear.

Search for local TV, radio, newspapers, and magazines in your local area.  Magazines in the USA,  USA newspapers, USA TV stations, and USA local news media by city and state.

P.S. If you are a U.S. veteran, reach out to me. Let’s talk and see if I can be of any further assistance. Mark Baird/ ceo@hirepatriots.com/ 760-730-3734

Meet the U.S. Army Medical Command Equal Opportunity Advisor of the Year

LinkedIn
Sgt. 1st Class Brian Wharton in uniform with U.S. Flag behind him

By Mr. John Ciccarelli (Regional Health Command Pacific)

It was April Fools’ Day when Sgt. 1st Class Brian Wharton received news he couldn’t believe. Through fragmented texts exchanged during a flight across the Pacific Ocean, Wharton discovered that he had been named the Equal Opportunity Advisor (EOA) of the Year for U.S. Army Medical Command.

“I was thinking to myself, ‘No way!'” he said. “It wasn’t until I landed that I received the confirmation letter in my e-mail.”

Wharton assumed duties as an EOA after graduating from the Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute in 2017. Assigned to Tripler Army Medical Center (TAMC), he immersed himself in building relationships with the staff of more than 4,500 Soldiers and civilians, which earned him widespread admiration and gratitude.

“His drive and determination as EOA have established a positive climate for the command and adherence to higher standards of equality through awareness initiatives, open and focused discussions, and providing sound advice to the commander and staff members,” said Col. Mary V. Krueger, Commander of TAMC.

The EO program is the Army’s way of validating the values we stand for in a visible way, Wharton said.

“Embracing our differences, acknowledging our histories, and showing respect for the plethora of people that make up our military forces shows our Soldiers that we are not separate entities but rather one and the same,” added Wharton.

Wharton has been busy planning, coordinating and executing observances across the Army. The Army Hawaii EO office selected Tripler to lead eight observances in fiscal year 2018, setting the standard for other units.

“As the world is evolving, so are we as individuals,” Wharton said. “We must continue to create a safe place for individuals to talk about differences and create solutions to work well as a multidisciplinary team from various backgrounds. Our ability to do this is what makes us great.”

Wharton was born and raised in Detroit. He enlisted in the Army in 2003 and attended basic training at Fort Jackson, South Carolina, and advanced individual training at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, where he became an Army healthcare specialist.

Wharton said it is important to embrace each opportunity to further the platform of EO to Soldiers, civilian counterparts and the communities in which we serve.

“Creating partnerships that haven’t been created before and soliciting assistance from outside organizations will make for a larger impact and lasting changes throughout the world,” said Wharton.

Source: army.mil

Together We Served: A website to help you find old friends

LinkedIn
Group of U.S. Military pictured in rows wearing military uniforms

The United States military is a brotherhood and sisterhood like no other. Those who serve together form a common sense of purpose and devotion to duty. It’s a level of trust not commonly found in civilian life.

Those military friendships last forever. But as life moves, and when people leave the military, they often lose touch with those friends, some of whom they would have given their life for.

Tracking down old friends, particularly if you have been out of the service many years, is not always easy. But there is one company that can help. Together We Served (TWS) is a Veteran-only website, launched in 2003. It provides Veterans a highly-effective means to reconnect with old service-friends. One simply enters their service history onto their TWS Military Service Page. TWS built an individual website for each branch of service and, with over 1.9 million Veteran members, the chances of finding people you served with is high.

The secret behind TWS’s ability to connect more Veterans is the depth of its databases. Over the past 16 years, TWS has built one of the most comprehensive databases of U.S. Military training and operating units in existence. Its databases span from WW2 to present day.

Military Service Page

By creating your Military Service Page on Together We Served, you can not only find Veterans who went to the same basic training as you, or served in the same units or duty stations, but also those who participated in the same combat or non-combat operations. TWS’s search engine automatically matches the service information you enter on your Military Service Page with the service information on the Military Service Pages of all other TWS members. Those members, whose entries could match yours, get listed on your Service Page. That is what enables you to make contact with those you may know. This powerful feature helps Veterans remember forgotten names.

Finding key people on TWS can be very helpful, especially if you need or can provide witness account to support a potential VA claim.

“We are especially proud of the fact that Together We Served has been able to help hundreds of thousands of Veterans to reconnect with old service friends they would otherwise never see or hear of again. For a combat Veteran, in particular, to be able to re-unite with someone you went through hell and back with, can be a very cathartic experience”. –Brian Foster, President and Founder of Together We Served

Take this opportunity to reconnect with the servicemen and women you shared some of the most important times of your life with. In recognition of your service, Together We Served provides all VA Veterans with a FREE One Year Premium Membership, providing unlimited people searches, when you join TWS via the following link: join.togetherweserved.com/va

Continue on to the VA website to read the complete article.

Anyone Can Register for this MilSpouse Hackathon

LinkedIn
military spouse working on a computer

Have you ever wanted to learn how to code or just improve your skills? Now is your chance! Milspouse Coders, a nonprofit dedicated to empowering military spouses around the globe to find challenging and fulfilling careers in technology, is hosting a live hackathon at the Microsoft Visitors Center in Redmond, Washington, on Nov. 8-9, 2019.

In the annual hackathon, coders, entrepreneurs, UI/UX designers, graphic designers and project managers come together to “hack” a solution or to create the next big app. This year, the Microsoft Military Spouse Technology Academy is sponsoring the event, which will focus on hacking the military life — finding ways to knock down obstacles military families face.

“We have registrations from civilians local to Seattle/Redmond, but we’d really like to fill the seats with more military-affiliated tech lovers,” said MilSpouse Coders Chair Kerri-Leigh Grady in an email. “We want to expose our community to the opportunities available to us in this industry, whether it’s a milspouse hungry for a career of their own, or a transitioning service member curious about the wide range of opportunities in this field.”

Beginners are welcome and will learn to code. If you’re unable to attend the event but are interested in learning more, MilSpouse Coders has 15 chapters around the globe, as well as a virtual chapter. Military spouses of all coding levels are encouraged to participate in their local chapter or online.

“Military spouses are perfectly suited for IT careers,” said Grady in an interview. “IT tends to have a distributed workforce, which offers military spouses the flexibility they need with moves.”

She also said that military spouses should consider a career in IT because of the diversity of positions available, as well as the sheer number of jobs that are open in the industry.

Continue on to Military.com to read the complete article.

Huan Nguyen First Vietnamese American Navy Rear Admiral

LinkedIn
Vice Adm. Thomas J. Moore administers the oath of office to Rear Adm. Huan T. Nguyen during Nguyen's promotion ceremony at the U.S. Navy Memorial & Heritage Center, Oct. 10, 2019.

WASHINGTON (NNS) — Huan Nguyen became the first Vietnamese American promoted to the rank of rear admiral during a recent ceremony at the Navy Memorial in Washington, D.C.

Nguyen, 60, will serve as the Deputy Commander for Cyber Engineering at the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) on the Washington Navy Yard. NAVSEA Commander Vice Adm. Tom Moore served as the presiding officer.

“Today we will welcome the first Vietnamese-born U.S. Navy officer to achieve flag rank, and that is a significant event,” Moore said.

Nguyen addressed the audience after being promoted. “It is a great honor to attain the rank of admiral,” Nguyen said. “I am tremendously humbled to become the first Vietnamese American to wear the flag’s rank in the U.S. Navy.

“The honor actually belongs to the Vietnamese American community, which instilled in us a sense of patriotism, duty, honor, courage and commitment to our adopted country, the United States of America,” he added.

“This is our America. A country built on service, kindness and generosity, opportunity–the freedom to hope and dream. These values are what inspired me to serve. And what a great honor and privilege it is to serve our Navy, to serve our country, to support and defend our Constitution,” Nguyen said.

Nguyen was born in Hue, Vietnam, the son of an armor officer in the Army of the Republic of Vietnam. During the 1968 Tet Offensive, Nguyen’s mother and father, along with his five brothers and sister, were killed by Viet Cong communist guerillas in their family home outside Saigon. Nine-year-old Nguyen was shot in the arm and thigh, with another bullet piercing his skull. He stayed with his mother for two hours, until she bled out and died. Amazingly, Nguyen survived and escaped after dark.

Nguyen was taken in by his uncle, a colonel in the Republic of Vietnam Air Force. In 1975, at age 16, they fled Vietnam, seeking refuge in the United States following the fall of Saigon.

Transported through Guam, U.S. Navy and Marine Corps personnel took care of Nguyen and his family. The U.S. 7th Fleet helped to evacuate thousands of Vietnamese refugees and transport them to safety in Guam. Seeing the U.S. Navy take care of his family would later inspire Nguyen to serve in the Navy.

“I was one of those refugees, apprehensive about an uncertain future, yet feeling extremely grateful that I was here at all,” he recalled. “The images that I remember vividly when I arrived at Camp Asan, Guam, now Asan Beach Park, were of American sailors and Marines toiling in the hot sun, setting up tents and chow hall, distributing water and hot food, helping and caring for the people with dignity and respect.

“I thought to myself how lucky I am to be in a place like America. Those sailors inspired me to later serve in the United States Navy,” Nguyen said.

Later that year, U.S. Air Force Colonel Ed Veiluva and his wife Dorothy sponsored his uncle’s family, allowing them to officially come to the United States as political refugees. Nguyen moved with his uncle’s family to Midwest City, Oklahoma, just outside of Tinker Air Force Base.

Nguyen graduated with a bachelor of science degree in Electrical Engineering from Oklahoma State University in 1981. He holds master’s degrees in Electrical Engineering from Southern Methodist University, in Engineering (Manufacturing Concentration) from Purdue University, and in Information Technology with Highest Distinction from Carnegie Mellon University. He received a Navy direct commission through the Reserve Engineering Duty Officer program in 1993.

“America is the beacon of hope for all of us. There is no other place in the world where a person can go for such opportunity,” Nguyen said.

Nguyen’s operational tours include a number of waterfront maintenance assignments: Ship Repair Facility Yokosuka as testing officer on USS Kitty Hawk availability; Officer in Charge, Ship Repair Facility, Detachment 113.  Later, he served as Executive Officer/Chief Engineer at the Joint Counter Radio-Controlled Improvised Explosive Device (CREW) Field Office in Baghdad supporting Task Force Troy/18th Airborne Corps and V Corps, CREW Engineer at Task Force Paladin and Combined Explosive/Exploitation Cell (CEXC) in Afghanistan.

Staff assignments included duties as Deputy Chief Information Officer, Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) from 2017-2019, Director Military Programs, Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) and Executive Officer, NAVSEA Enlisted Personnel from 2013 – 2017.  He also served as Community Manager, Engineering Duty Officer (Reserve Component). Reserve assignments include multiple command tours with various units at NAVSEA, Pacific Fleet (PACFLT), and Office of Naval Research.

Nguyen’s personal awards include the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star Medal, Meritorious Service Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (two awards) and Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (two awards).

Get more information about the Navy from US Navy facebook or twitter.

Source: Naval Sea Systems Command.

Photo credit: U.S. Navy photo by Laura Lakeway