Successful Transition Begins with Backward Planning

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man thinking about his next career

By Mike Olivier

There are a few transitions in life that are inevitable; of that number there are fewer still where the day and time are certain. The transition from the military to civilian life is one of those transitions.

For those entering the civilian workforce, now is a good time. The military is heartily supported by all sectors of society, the economy is good, and unemployment is very low. That means getting a job is most likely not as difficult as it has been in the past. Nevertheless, there is no one standing outside the base gate handing out hundred dollars bills and employment contracts. Which means finding a good job is going to take work, and it is still going to require planning.

The good news is that the transition date for your departure from military life is certain, and you have advance notice. For some, this transition is seamless—they will go to work in the family business, a few will change their military uniform for civilian clothes and go back to work at the same desk, and some will go to college. Most will venture into the unknown and look for work. It doesn’t matter if you’re going on to school, to work, or going back to the family farm—getting there successfully is going to require a degree of planning.

One thing that most likely rubbed off during your time in the military is an acknowledgement of the value of planning. There is not much in the military that is not the result of planning, good or bad; and knowing when you are released from active duty provides you the opportunity to plan your next step. This ability to backward plan is going to provide you with options, and it is going to give you a better chance of succeeding in your transition. The military now offers a number of transition classes, and there are countless programs and agencies that will help point you in the right direction. Taking advantage of these resources is about the most common-sense action one can take. Even if they are incomplete in some respect, these resources can provide you with options and direction.

Networking is successful quote

Before you can plan, you will need to identify a goal: even if this is a leap into the unknown, there has to be somewhere to land. In this process, the question is often framed as “What do you want to do?” It is good to think about this holistically; that is, where do you want to live, what do the others in your life want, and, practically, what do you need? The answer to these and other related questions may align with one another, or, more likely, the answers will point you in opposite directions. Nevertheless, it is important to understand that this is a discovery process, and that answers to these questions may only eliminate options, but that’s a good thing. As you narrow your options, the remaining few provide direction to your transition goal.

In terms of backward planning, the milestones in the plan are going to be set by the objective. If the goal is to go to school to gain skills or to complete a degree, then identifying and getting accepted into the school is going to take time. The planning elements are gathering up transcripts, completing forms and applications, and meeting deadlines. Applying for a job also takes time as you determine what skills you need to be competitive, complete a resume, attend job fairs, and schedule meetings with recruiters. About 80 percent of people get a job through networking. If you have been in the military and out of the job market, out the network, you have to be proactive to establish your network. This is not a weekend task. You will need to establish your network by focusing on the industry. All industries have associations and events, and you create your industry-specific network by attending these events and meeting people. Volunteering at these events is another good way to get to know key people in the industry. If you want to be part of the successful 80 percent, you need to be known within the network.
Transition, for most, is stressful and challenging—it is a culture change, it is a risk. Improve your success and reduce risk and stress by backward planning. Knowing when you get out, where you want to end up, and the tasks to be completed are all elements of the plan. The most important point is don’t wait—start the plan and execute. When you get out, be where you want to be, not struggling to get there.

Workplace Etiquette You Should Know

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Business men in smart casual wear shaking hands in office

How you present yourself to others in the business world speaks volumes. People often form first impressions about others within seconds of first meeting them therefore it is crucial to ensure you are properly prepared to present yourself as a professional. Here are some important tips on dealing with people, communicating, and interacting at meetings that will help you make a good impression.

Dealing with People

How you treat people says a lot about you.

  • Learn names and learn them quickly. A good tip for remembering names is to use a person’s name three times within your first conversation with them. Also, write names down and keep business cards. People know when you don’t know their names and may interpret this as a sign that you don’t value them.
  • Don’t make value judgments on people’s importance in the workplace. Talk to the maintenance staff members and to the people who perform many of the administrative support functions. These people deserve your respect!
  • Self-assess: Think about how you treat your supervisor(s), peers, and subordinates. Would the differences in the relationships, if seen by others, cast you in an unfavorable light? If so, find where the imbalance exists, and start the process of reworking the relationship dynamic.
  • What you share with others about your personal life is your choice, but be careful. Things can come back to haunt you. Don’t ask others to share their personal lives with you. This makes many people uncomfortable in the work space.
  • Respect people’s personal space. This may be very different than your own.

Communicating Effectively

It’s sometimes not what you say, but how you say it that counts!

  • Return phone calls and emails within 24 hours – even if only to say that you will provide requested information at a later date.
  • Ask before putting someone on speakerphone.
  • Personalize your voice mail – there’s nothing worse than just hearing a phone number on someone’s voice mail and not knowing if you are leaving a message with the correct person. People may not even leave messages.
  • Emails at work should be grammatically correct and free of spelling errors. They should not be treated like personal email.
  • When emailing, use the subject box, and make sure it directly relates to what you are writing. This ensures ease in finding it later and a potentially faster response.
  • Never say in an email anything you wouldn’t say to someone’s face.
  • Underlining, italicizing, bolding, coloring, and changing font size can make a mild email message seem overly strong or aggressive.

Navigating Office Meetings

This can easily be the most intimidating part of starting a new job. The environment of a meeting requires some careful navigation to maintain your professional image, whether the meetings are one-on-one, with several colleagues or with external clients.

  • For a meeting in someone’s office, don’t arrive more than five minutes early, as they may be prepping for your meeting, another meeting later that day, or trying to get other work done. You may make them uncomfortable, and that is not a good way to begin your meeting.
  • Don’t arrive late…ever. If you are going to be late, try to let someone know so that people are not sitting around waiting for you. Don’t forget that being on time for a meeting means arriving 5 minutes early – for an interview, arrive 10 minutes early.
  • When a meeting runs late and you need to be somewhere else, always be prepared to explain where you need to be (understanding that the value of where you need to be will likely be judged).
  • Do not interrupt people. This is a bad habit to start and a tough one to end.
  • There is a time and place for confrontation, and a meeting is almost never that place. You will embarrass and anger other people, and you will look bad for doing it. Give people time and space outside of meetings to reflect on issues that need to be dealt with.

Source: Columbia University, Center for Career Education

Military Makeover with Montel Williams Renovates Family Home of Late Chris Hixon, Marjory Stoneman Douglas Athletic Director in Parkland, FL, and 27 Year Navy Veteran.

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Military Makeover logo Montel Williams and Chris and Debra Hixon

U.S. Navy veteran Chris Hixon, a 27-year veteran (5 active, 22 reserve) who served in Desert Storm and Desert Shield, sacrificed his life on February 14, 2018, when the Athletic Director ran into Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and tried to save the lives of students by disarming an active shooter.

Hixon is survived by his wife Debra and their two sons, Thomas and Corey.

Debra, also the  daughter of a Navy veteran, has been a teacher for 29 years, serving as a Magnet Coordinator at South Broward High School’s Marine Science Maritime Magnet Program and cares for her special needs son, Cory, who was a big part of the makeover. Cory’s room was inspired by his love for prayer and church.

“He loved being American and serving his country, and he instilled it in his students,” Debra said. Chris Hixon received Military Funeral Honors before he was laid to rest at the age of 49 at the South Florida VA National Cemetery in Lake Worth, FL, on Feb. 21, 2018.

In partnership with major national and local brands, the Military Makeover team comes prepared with building supplies, designs, furniture, gifts and much more from the generous partnerships cultivated by the show.

Additionally, volunteers will be invited to participate and lend a hand in support of the Hixon Family during the renovation of the home they shared for 28 years.

The first episode airs on February 14th at 7:30am EST, the second year anniversary of the tragic shooting at Marjory Stone Douglas High School.

All aired episodes can be found at militarymakeover.tv/

Navy to name new aircraft carrier for African American WWII hero

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Doris "Dorie" Miller pictured in his Nvy uniform

The US Navy will name a new aircraft carrier after Doris “Dorie” Miller, a decorated African American World War II veteran who defended Pearl Harbor during the 1941 attack on the Hawaii naval base, making it the first aircraft carrier to be named after an African American.

Acting Secretary of the Navy Thomas Modly made the announcement Monday during a ceremony at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the national holiday commemorating the life of the slain civil rights leader.

During the attack on Pearl Harbor, Miller manned an anti-aircraft machine gun aboard the battleship USS West Virginia “until he ran out of ammunition and was ordered to abandon ship,” according to a Navy biography, which said he “had not been trained to operate” the weapon. Miller said he believed he shot down a Japanese plane during the attack, the biography said. The following year, Miller received the Navy Cross, the highest medal awarded by the Navy, becoming the first African American to receive the honor.

“Dorie Miller stood for everything that is good about our nation,” Modly said. “His story deserves to be remembered and repeated wherever our people continue to stand the watch today.”

The aircraft carrier to be named after Miller will also be the first one named after an enlisted sailor, Modly added. Miller fought in the Pacific Theater until November 1943, when the ship he was assigned to was sunk by a Japanese submarine torpedo. He was listed as missing for a year and a day before being presumed dead on November 25, 1944, according to his biography.

In addition to the Navy Cross, Miller also received the Purple Heart Medal and the American Defense Service Medal, Fleet Clasp, as well as the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal and the World War II Victory Medal, according to the Navy. In 1973, a Knox-class frigate was named in honor of Miller, but was later decommissioned in the 1990s.

Continue on to CNN News to read the complete article.

Sailor Spotlight! Boatswain’s Mate 1st Class Jonathan Cole

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Boatswain’s Mate 1st Class Jonathan Cole

SAN DIEGO – Boatswain’s Mate 1st Class Jonathan Cole, from Anaheim, Calif., assigned to the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), participates in the E-7 Navy-wide advancement exam.

Bonhomme Richard is in its homeport of San Diego. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Zachary DiPadova)

The men and women in the U.S. Navy are deployed around the clock and ready to protect and defend America on the world’s oceans.

Source: outreach.navy.mil

Army Green Berets earn over 50 combat awards — including three Silver Stars — in Afghanistan

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Deputy Commander Col. Steven M. Marks salutes a 2nd Battalion, 7th Special Forces Group (Airborne) soldier during a ceremony at the chapel on Eglin Air Force Base

Dozens of Green Berets received valor awards, including three Silver Star medals, in a recent ceremony meant to highlight the bravery and dedication that members of 7th Special Forces Group (Airborne) showed during a recent Afghanistan deployment.

In addition to the trio of Silver Stars — the military’s third-highest personal award for combat bravery — officials also presented seven Bronze Stars for valor and 17 Army Commendation medals. The 27 valor awards were presented during the ceremony at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., officials said.

“This is a reminder that even in the modern age, warfare is still about courage under fire,” said Col. Steven M. Marks, deputy commander of 1st Special Forces Command (Airborne), in a 7th Group statement. Marks presented the medals at Eglin’s Liberty Chapel.

The unit’s soldiers also earned 21 Purple Hearts during the combat zone deployment, a 1st Special Forces Command (Airborne) spokesman told Stars and Stripes.

The decorations were awarded to the soldiers of 7th Group’s 2nd Battalion for actions during a six-month deployment in late 2018.

The Bronze Star is for acts of heroism of a lesser degree than the Silver Star, which is awarded for acts of gallantry of a higher degree than those meriting any other U.S. combat decoration except the Medal of Honor or service crosses. The Army Commendation medal ranks below the Bronze Star.

Pictured above: Thursday, Jan. 9, 2019, 1st Special Forces Command (Airborne) Deputy Commander Col. Steven M. Marks salutes a 2nd Battalion, 7th Special Forces Group (Airborne) soldier during a ceremony at the chapel on Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., after presenting him a medal for valorous acts during the battalion’s recent deployment to Afghanistan. Liberty chapel on Jan. 9. Jose Vargas/U.S. Army
JOSE VARGAS/U.S. ARMY

Four Green Berets who had earned additional valor awards — two Bronze Stars and two Army Commendation medals — were absent. Twenty-six soldiers earned valor awards, with five of them earning two valor awards and six earning both an award for valor and the Purple Heart for being wounded in action.

“The valor we are recognizing today happened at the most tactical level — face to face fighting, close quarters combat, hand grenade-range,” Marks said.

The 7th Group statement did not provide details of the specific acts that were recognized, which occurred during a war that has largely faded from public view during which most offensive operations are carried out by shadowy commando units.

A relative few U.S. troops, typically special operations forces, have gone into combat or served on the front lines in Afghanistan since 2014, often as part of unilateral or joint operations with their Afghan counterparts during separate U.S. counterterrorism mission.

During 2nd Battalion’s deployment from September 2018 to February 2019, some 14,000 U.S. troops were deployed to the country, most as part of a NATO mission training, advising and assisting Afghan security forces for battling a Taliban insurgency against the Kabul government.

Continue on to Stars and Stripes to read the complete article.

What Are the Highest-Paying Jobs?

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Builder team meeting and planning for renovation office project. worker contractor talking with architect and discussing about job.

Let’s be honest—who doesn’t want to earn more money? While salary is far from the only thing that matters when considering a career path, it is definitely an important factor.

Figuring out what a job pays will help you, in part, decide whether or not a field is right for you.

Recently, the Economic Research team at Glassdoor sifted through the millions of data points on our site to identify which jobs pay top dollar.

See below for a preview of the top 15 highest-paying positions.

1 Physician
Median Base Salary: $193,415
Number of open jobs: 40,000+

2 Pharmacy Manager
Median Base Salary: $144,768
Number of open jobs: 4,200+

3 Dentist
Median Base Salary: $142,478
Number of open jobs: 11,600+

4 Pharmacist
Median Base Salary: $126,438
Number of open jobs: 7,967

5 Enterprise Architect
Median Base Salary: $122,585
Number of open jobs: 16,900+

6 Corporate Counsel
Median Base Salary: $117,588
Number of open jobs: 4,900+

7 Software Engineering Manager
Median Base Salary: $114,163
Number of open jobs: 21,500+

8 Physician Assistant
Median Base Salary: $113,855
Number of open jobs: 41,800+

9 Corporate Controller
Median Base Salary: $113,368
Number of open jobs: 7,400+

10 Software Development Manager
Median Base Salary: $109,809
Number of open jobs: 50,100+

11 Nurse Practitioner
Median Base Salary: $109,481
Number of open jobs: 19,500+

12 Applications Development Manager
Median Base Salary: $107,735
Number of open jobs: 32,100+

13 Solutions Architect
Median Base Salary: $106,436
Number of open jobs: $59,500

14 Data Architect
Median Base Salary: $104,840
Number of open jobs: 21,700+

15 Plant Manager
Median Base Salary: $104,817
Number of open jobs: 6,500+

Methodology
Glassdoor’s 25 Highest-Paying Jobs in America report identifies the jobs with the highest annual median base salary, using a proprietary statistical algorithm to estimate annual median base pay, which controls for factors such as location and seniority. Job titles must receive at least 100 salary reports shared by U.S.-based employees over the past year (7/01/18–6/30/19).

The number of job openings per job title represents active job listings on Glassdoor as of 8/26/19. This report takes into account job title normalization that groups similar job titles. C-suite level jobs were excluded from this report.

Defense Department expands commissary access to more military members

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Commissary building

The New Year brought new perks for some military members and their families.

The Department of Defense expanded shopping privileges at its commissaries to a number of new groups, including Purple Heart recipients, former prisoners of war, all veterans with service-connected disabilities and individuals approved as the primary family caregivers of eligible veterans.

The expanded eligibility went into effect Jan. 1.

Other patrons authorized to shop at commissaries by the Department of Defense include active duty, Guard and Reserve members, military retirees, Medal of Honor recipients, 100 percent disabled veterans and authorized family members.

Commissaries are discounted grocery shopping facilities located on bases. By law, the shop is required to deliver savings to shoppers, based on prices negotiated with manufacturers. Baseline savings are typically expected to be just shy of 24 percent.

Shoppers are subject to a 5 percent surcharge but no state and local food-related taxes. The surcharge is used for store upkeep and construction.

In addition to commissaries, newly eligible military personnel will also have access to military service exchanges, golf courses, bowling centers, recreational lodging, RV campgrounds, movie theaters and other facilities.

According to the Department of Defense, eligibility is limited because it does not have the infrastructure to handle an influx of more than 15 million additional veterans to the facilities.

Not only did the new year bring new benefits for some veterans, it also brought higher pay for service members.

Continue on to Fox Business News to read the complete article.

Paws of War Helps American Soldiers Bring Home Dogs from the Middle East

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U.S. Soldier is holding up his rescue dog for a picture

Being deployed to Afghanistan can be dangerous and stressful for our service members. Some of these service members rescue stray dogs and befriend them. When it’s time to head back to the United States, the last thing they can think of is leaving the dog behind to fend for itself. One soldier, Sgt. Dominick, is desperate to bring his dog, Jonsey, back home with him.

“After these dogs are rescued, they develop a special bond with our service members. These dogs will not leave their side and become very attached and loyal,” explains Dori Scofield co-founder of Paws of War. “There’s no way they can leave them, so we do everything we can to help them bring the dog home with them. We need all the support we can get from the public in order to be successful with these efforts.”

Army Sgt. Dominick, who is stationed in a remote area of Afghanistan, first spotted Jonsey when the starving puppy was eating burnt trash outside of his camp. He took the puppy in, fed him, and the whole unit fell in love with him, which brought them joy. He named him Jonsey, and the dog grew to feel like a part of his family. Now that he will be heading back to the United States, he can’t bear to leave him behind.

Stray dogs in Afghanistan have a very rough life and often times are subjected to cruelty. Desperate to bring him back home with him to live out his life and be a part of his larger family, he turned to Paws of War for assistance. The organization has a program in place that helps service members bring their dog home after being deployed to the Middle East. While they are always quick to help do what they can, they can’t do it alone.

In order for Paws of War to be successful at bringing a dog back to America from Afghanistan, they work with Nowzad, the only official animal shelter in Afghanistan, and get financial support from public donations. There’s a lot that goes into bringing a dog back to the U.S., including quarantine, all of which comes at a high cost.

If you would like to help, please donate here:pawsofwar.org/donate. To learn more about Paws of War and the programs please visit pawsofwar.org.

About Paws of War

Paws of War is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) charitable organization that provides assistance to active, retired, and disabled military members. To learn more about Paws of War and the programs provided or to make a donation visit its site at: pawsofwar.org.

Companies who love to hire veterans

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picture of a magnet plucking a veteran like figure out the rest of the line up

These veteran-friendly companies offer everything from transition assistance to hiring bonuses.

By Lillian Childress

Returning to the workforce after a career in the military can have unique challenges, and some companies recognize that. We’re highlighting companies that make a special effort to provide resources for the veterans they employ and their families.

Last year, Glassdoor interviewed Mike Hansen, the national director of military affairs at Power Home Remodeling, who talked about returning to the workforce after his deployment.

“After the shock factor of not being in the military anymore subsides, it’s all about how quickly you can apply the skills that you developed in the military. This application phase is the biggest differentiator of success—if veterans can focus on understanding, ‘I bring all these attributes, now it’s just about applying them to a different environment,’ they can find proficiency more quickly.”

Power Home Remodeling is just one of the companies leading the charge in facilitating veteran success in the workforce, offering a $3,000 hiring bonus for veterans. The list we’ve drawn up here highlight companies who are going the extra mile for veterans:

Booz Allen Hamilton

Where Hiring: Washington, DC; Arlington, VA; Fort Meade, MD; Falls Church, VA; Bethesda, MD; McLean, VA; Rockville, MD; Reston, VA; Chantilly, VA, & more.

Resources for Veterans: If you’re a veteran at Booz Allen Hamilton, you’ll be in good company: one-third of the company’s workforce are veterans. The company has multiple military-focused employee forums that offer networking and career training, and serve as knowledge bases for veterans and military spouses. Booz Allen also offers enviable benefits for reservists, including differential pay for up to 6 months, and continuing health and retirement benefits for the duration of an employee’s active duty assignment.

What Employees Say: “Great option for transitioning veterans to get their ‘foot-in-the-door’ in the commercial sector.” (from a current employee)

Walgreens

Where Hiring: Centreville, VA; Largo, MD; Washington, DC; Miami, FL; Worcester, MA; Oakland Park, FL; Hurst, TX; Porter, TX; Orlando, FL; Falls Church, VA, & more.

Resources for Veterans: Walgreens offers a number of specialized programs for veterans, including their HERO Program, which includes retail management training, on-the-job mentorship, and program support for veterans. The chain also offers military leave and military bridge pay to eligible team members, as well as multiple resource groups for veterans.

What Employees Say: “I love working at Walgreens. I’ve been there since February 2017 and very quickly moved up in the company from Customer Service Associate, to Designated Hitter (which means I can also work in the pharmacy), to Shift Lead. This shows that if you work hard and have good customer and communication skills, you have a lot of opportunity here.” (from a current shift leader)

Power Home Remodeling

Where Hiring: Greenbelt, MD; Alexandria, VA; Philadelphia, PA; Tampa, FL; Arlington, VA; Canton, MI

Resources for Veterans: Power Home Remodeling is one of the leaders in innovative veteran employment programs, offering – get this – a $3,000 hiring bonus for both veterans and military spouses. The company also offers numerous programs to help integrate, train, and retain veterans.

What Employees Say: “Getting out of the army and finding a good job was hard for me. Power is the first place to not only recognize the leadership qualities that veterans have but to also recreate the feeling of comradery I felt in the military. It’s hard to put into words, but they somehow make me want to try my best each day” (from a current outbound marketer)

 

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

Where Hiring: Washington, DC; Bronx, NY; Indianapolis, IN; Hayward, WI; Austin, TX; Athens, GA; Miami, FL; Las Vegas, NV; Fayetteville, AR; Chillicothe, OH, & more.

Resources for Veterans: The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs knows how to value veterans. They offer a host of benefits for veterans that choose to work for them, including specialized tools and programs to help transition into civilian life, tuition assistance and loan repayment programs to help facilitate education, as well as a host of hiring initiatives and incentive programs.

What Employees Say: “Great mission, incredible benefits, good work/life balance.” (current physician)

Southwest Airlines

Where Hiring: Arlington, VA; Dallas, TX; Atlanta, GA; San Jose, CA; Orlando, FL; Minneapolis, MN; Richmond, VA; Pittsburgh, PA; Cleveland, OH, & more.

Resources for Veterans: A significant portion of the Southwest Airlines workforce comes from the military, with over 8,000 employees who have served or are actively serving, and more than 1,300 employees who are military spouses. Southwest offers a number of programs that help veterans transition into private sector jobs. Their website also features a military skills translator tool, where military members can enter their military job title or code to see the currently available opportunities at Southwest that align with their experience.

What Employees Say: “Culture is awesome. Lots of fun events throughout the year. Very family-oriented atmosphere. Flight benefits are great. Generally, you’re not expected to bring work home. Very stress-free environment. Benefits package is great. Profit sharing is great, 401k match is unheard of at 9.3 percent, and stock purchase plan is great.” (from a current yield analyst)

Boeing

Where Hiring: Chantilly, VA; Annapolis Junction, MD; Manassas, VA; Washington, DC; Herndon, VA; Hanover, MD; Aurora, CO; Oklahoma City, OK; Huntsville, AL; Tukwila, WA, & more.

Resources for Veterans: Boeing is committed to hiring veterans, as they make up 15 percent of the company’s workforce. Over 800 veteran-specific programs and organizations were supported by Boeing and its employees in 2018, and the company offers more than 30 veteran-focused employee engagement teams. These include skill development and workforce transition training, supporting recovery and rehabilitation programs that focus on post-traumatic stress, and promoting employee volunteering in veteran communities, according to Boeing’s website.

What Employees Say: “Industry leading pay and benefits. Largest aerospace company in the world. Lots of flexibility in assignments and projects. Good opportunities for continued education and career growth.” (from a current senior systems engineer)

The Home Depot

Where Hiring: Bloomfield, NJ; Plainfield, IL; El Cerrito, CA; Odessa, TX; Tempe, AZ; Southfield, MI; Bolingbrook, IL; Hawthorne, NY; Vancouver, WA; Miami, FL, & more.

Resources for Veterans: Already famous for their 10 percent discount for retired military members, Home Depot has also a strong commitment towards hiring veterans, with 55,000 hired since 2012. At Home Depot, an associate-run group called Military Appreciation Group, or MAG, helps veterans transition back into the working world and supports the families of deployed military members.

What Employees Say: “The Home Depot is a really employee-oriented business. They allow you to grow and gain the skills needed in case you decide to move to another position. They are very flexible with your schedule.” (from a current appliance sales specialist)

Other Opportunities

Did you drive trucks or other large vehicles in the military? Right now, there’s an extreme shortage of qualified truck drivers in today’s pool of job seekers, and military veterans are the ideal candidate for this type of job. Some trucking companies are actively seeking out military veterans for positions at their companies. Drive My Way, a company that matches CDL truck drivers and owner operators with jobs, offers a list of trucking companies hiring veterans for you to consider, including Holland and Oldcastle.

Source: glassdoor.com

Veteran Skills Translate to Private Sector in Many Ways

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transitioning-military

By Sara Slettebo

Military veterans have many ways to benefit your business. They have extensive skills and offer a broad spectrum of experience. Not only are they
trained to fight for our country, but they are also trained for individual job responsibilities that translate well into the private sector.

Here are five ways veterans can be a good fit for your business:

40+ Occupation Groups

Across all branches of the military, there are more than 40 occupational groups. These range from accounting to transportation, with military occupational groups aligning with almost every civilian business. There are occupational groups for administration positions, supply and logistics, information technology, and many more. Many military members also receive training in various medical and dental occupations, and veterinary fields as part of their military career.

2100+ Job Categories

There are more than 2,100 jobs available to members of the U.S. Navy, Army, Marine Corps or Air Force. These jobs sometimes can have military occupation codes associated with them, or include military terminology, but all jobs can be related to a civilian counterpart. Finding the precise military job(s) applicable to your company is easy. There are several tools used to help businesses find the right candidates. AVFE’s proprietary VAST Database allows searching by keyword, business area or certification level, as well as other criteria.

Technical and Managerial Fields

Military jobs are categorized into either technical or managerial fields, or (in some cases of senior enlisted personnel and non-commissioned officers), they can be both. As a general rule of thumb, the enlisted ranks tend to be more technical in nature with leadership experience gained by progressing through the ranks. Officer ranks are more management based throughout their careers. Most jobs in the military have both a technical and managerial aspect and would be advantageous to any company.

Leadership and Ethics

Military personnel receive an abundance of leadership and ethics training. No matter the rank or rate, service members are taught the importance of sound leadership and solid ethics from the first day of boot camp. They continue to ‘practice’ their leadership as service members earn promotions. Ethics play a large part in all aspects of being in the military. With their leadership experience and firm ethical foundation, veterans would be an asset for any company.

Can-Do Attitudes

Many times in the military, soldiers and sailors are given a mission or goal, which seems insurmountable, but they are able to achieve it through hard work and never giving up. Military members have positive attitudes that can help any business accomplish their goals.

There are talented, experienced and waiting to become a member of your team, so hire one today!

Source: Association of Veteran Friendly Employers