Practical Resume Advice for Military Veterans

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Switching careers takes courage. And veterans know a thing or two about courage. But when military personnel finish serving their country and look to re-enter civilian life, they need more than just strong nerves to make the transition to a new career. Finding a job demands practical strategies.

For veterans, the struggle is often aligning the skills and experiences they’ve gained in the military with the types of jobs that exist outside the military. On top of that, long-serving veterans don’t have a lot of experience with resume making.

Not to worry. This post is all about helping those that have served in the armed forces create resumes as they seek out civilian positions.

We love bringing insights from job recruiters into the products and resources we offer. So, after talking with recruiters about their experiences hiring veterans, we’ve focused this post on the following areas:

Keep in mind that there are plenty of other considerations when making a resume. So be sure to also see our guide on how to build a resume in 2019.

Best resume format for military veterans

There are three different resume formats that are typically used for resumes. For veterans, the most suitable choice is what is called a “functional” or “skills-based” resume format.

Why this? Well the logic behind the functional format is that it gives greater attention to the skills a person has developed. This stands in contrast to the “reverse chronological” resume format, which offers more space for a person to outline a long employment history in order to demonstrate career progression.

Many veterans have spent much of their working life in the military, so their employment history is really one employer – even if they have progressed through different roles or ranks.

That being the case, listing all the positions and responsibilities over a military career often isn’t the best strategy for persuading recruiters in the public or private sector.

This is because recruiters often aren’t familiar with the types of work military personnel undertake, and therefore may not see the applicability of military experience.

To avoid this problem, veterans should focus less on describing their former roles/responsibilities, and instead focus on highlighting the skills they have gained that are directly relevant to the position they are seeking.

Sample of a Military to Civilian Resume

military veteran resume example

Continue on to Novoresume.com to begin building your resume!

Keep Your Eye on These 15 Jobs

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You might be thinking, “How can I find a private sector career when my work history is so different?” The good news is, though, there are plenty of great jobs for veterans out there.

The truth is, many employers are eager to hire veterans. The discipline, leadership and work ethic that you learn in the military translhttps://www.usveteransmagazine.com/wp-admin/post-new.php#edit_timestampate well into the private sector, and the diversity of experience you bring with you can help lead to new and innovative ideas and solutions.

So what jobs most benefit from these skills?

While your options are endless, we’ve put together a list of great jobs for veterans.

All of these positions benefit from the skills you learn in the military and have relatively low barriers to entry—no need to have years of directly related work experience.

Check them out below, and apply today!

PROJECT COORDINATOR

Average base pay: $51,468/yr

Project coordinators oversee projects, making sure each necessary component is delivered on time and within budget. To excel in this position, you’ll need superb organizational and communication skills.

See open jobs here: glassdoor.com/Job/project-coordinator-jobs-SRCH_KO0,19.htm

TRUCK DRIVER

Average base pay: $43,464/yr

Don’t let fears of automation dissuade you—truck drivers are in high demand right now and will likely continue to be in the foreseeable future. Truck drivers carry cargo from point A to point B and require a commercial driving license. It may also be a good idea to attend truck driving school if you don’t have experience driving large vehicles.

See open jobs here: glassdoor.com/Job/truck-driver-jobs-SRCH_KO0,12.htm

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

Average base pay: $39,300/yr

Sales representatives reach out and field inquiries from prospective customers, whether through email, phone or in-person. Sales representatives should have excellent people and communication skills and understand their clients’ needs.

See open jobs here: glassdoor.com/Job/sales-representative-jobs-SRCH_KO0,20.htm

RECRUITER

Average base pay: $51,349/yr

In many ways, recruiters’ jobs are very similar to sales representatives—but rather than selling a product or service to a client, they’re selling a candidate on a job and company. Recruiters both proactively seek out candidates for open jobs and field inquiries from interested candidates. Great people and organizational skills are a must.

See open jobs here: glassdoor.com/Job/recruiter-jobs-SRCH_KO0,9.htm

TECHNICIAN

Average base pay: $36,826/yr

If you have previous experience repairing or maintaining equipment, you might be interested in a career as a technician. Technicians work on all sorts of equipment and machinery, from cars to computers to aircraft and more. Depending on which field you enter, you may need certification, but programs are often significantly less time-intensive and costly than college degrees.

See open jobs here: glassdoor.com/Job/technician-jobs-SRCH_KO0,10.htm

OPERATIONS COORDINATOR

Average base pay: $48,397/yr

Operations coordinator is a role where you ensure that a business runs smoothly and efficiently. To do this, you’ll perform various support tasks for the team you’re assigned to. Candidates should be detail-oriented, organized and excellent at time management.

See open jobs here: glassdoor.com/Job/operations-coordinator-jobs-SRCH_KO0,22.htm

Store Manager

Average base pay: $50,688/yr

An excellent choice for anyone with leadership experience, store managers are tasked with leading the day-to-day functions of a store. This might include scheduling, inventory, employee training and coaching, marketing and reporting.

See open jobs here: glassdoor.com/Job/store-manager-jobs-SRCH_KO0,13.htm

Plumber

Average base pay: $50,000/yr

Another strong option for those with maintenance and repair experience, plumbers install and fix water-supplying pipes and drains. Plumbers usually need proper licensing, which can be obtained through a combination of training, experience and sometimes an exam.

See open jobs here: glassdoor.com/Job/plumber-jobs-SRCH_KO0,7.htm

Customer Support Representative

Average base pay: $33,512/yr

Customer support representatives’ primary responsibility is to keep customers satisfied. They do this by fielding questions and complaints, whether through phone, email, in person or on social media. Customer support representatives should have great people skills and an eagerness to become experts in their company’s products or services.

See open jobs here: glassdoor.com/Job/customer-support-representative-jobs-SRCH_KO0,31.htm

Electrician

Average base pay: $53,794/yr

As their title suggests, electricians install and repair electrical systems. They may work in residential homes, larger buildings, outdoor power lines or other specialties. Electricians typically need a license, which often requires formal training, an apprenticeship and an exam.

See open jobs here: glassdoor.com/Job/electrician-jobs-SRCH_KO0,11.htm

Logistics Coordinator

Average base pay: $46,898/yr

Those with military logistics training could excel in a private sector career in logistics. Logistics coordinators typically are responsible for managing activities in a company’s supply chain and may be responsible for coordinating and tracking shipments from departure to destination, communicating with suppliers and preparing accurate documents of record.

See open jobs here: glassdoor.com/Job/logistics-coordinator-jobs-SRCH_KO0,21.htm

Warehouse Associate

Average base pay: $24,000/yr

Prefer to stay on your feet and active? You might want to consider becoming a warehouse associate. Warehouse Associates spend their time moving packages between different destinations in a warehouse and may operate equipment like forklifts. While the pay is on the lower end, a hot labor market and the rising popularity of eCommerce is driving wages up.

See open jobs here: glassdoor.com/Job/warehouse-associate-jobs-SRCH_KO0,19.htm

DATA ANALYST

Average base pay: $67,377/yr

If you’ve got a knack for numbers, you might want to become a data analyst. Data analysts gather and analyze data to identify trends and derive business insights. You may need to teach yourself a few additional skills—SQL, R and Python are common computing languages used—but there’s no shortage of online tutorials and courses to help you out.

See open jobs here: glassdoor.com/Job/data-analyst-jobs-SRCH_KO0,12.htm

REAL ESTATE AGENT

Average base pay: $48,883/yr

Real estate agent is a common choice for career changers of all different backgrounds. Real estate agents connect prospective buyers or renters with available properties. They should have great interpersonal, sales and marketing skills, and must pass an exam to obtain a license.

See open jobs here: glassdoor.com/Job/real-estate-agent-jobs-SRCH_KO0,17.htm

IT SUPPORT SPECIALIST

Average base pay: $51,564/yr

Good with computers? Think about becoming an IT support specialist, whose primary duty is to ensure that an organization’s employees have a smooth technological experience. You may be required to assist with helpdesk tickets, set up equipment and train employees on new technologies. Formal training and certifications are sometimes required but can often be completed online or through a vocational school.

See open jobs here: glassdoor.com/Job/it-support-specialist-jobs-SRCH_KO0,21.htm

Source: Glassdoor

How to Navigate the Post-Military Job Search

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Jeff McMillan, Chief Data & Analytics Officer at Morgan Stanley Wealth Management

Over my years of advising veterans transitioning from military service to civilian workplaces, I’ve found that for many, the biggest obstacle
has nothing to do with their qualifications or abilities–it’s not knowing how to navigate the process of finding a job.

Knowing the basic steps and preparing for each one can help you put your best foot forward each time you submit an application or walk into an interview.

1. Write an impeccable resume

Your resume should communicate two kinds of information: 1) The type of role you are looking for and 2) How your unique experience and skills make you a strong candidate. When writing a resume, keep the following tips in mind:

● State the type of role you are looking for and a summary of your skills upfront. These first lines may be all a hiring manager reads, so make them concise and impactful.
● Highlight your experience and education, including specific skills and accomplishments that are relevant to the job for which you are applying.
● Avoid military jargon – Most civilians will not understand military acronyms and abbreviations, or even the names of specific units.
● Proofread thoroughly for spelling or grammatical errors.

2. Network early and often

Networking is the act of establishing mutually beneficial professional relationships. Like many veterans, I found the idea of networking to be strange and foreign at first. Military relationships are largely pre-determined according to the chain of command. But outside the military, building your professional network is up to you. Beyond finding a job, networking is about forging new relationships with people who can help you learn and grow. Meeting people from a wide variety of professional backgrounds helps you chart your own course, and each conversation will improve your ability to deliver a strong, compelling message about your skills and experience.

To get started, reach out to everyone you know who works in a field that interests you, especially other veterans–most enjoy speaking with transitioning vets. In recent years, a whole new generation of veterans’ groups has emerged and is modernizing engagement and support through community activism, training programs, and social engagement. I also recommend attending as many veteran-focused career fairs as you can. Numerous organizations as well as some universities and companies host events focused on educating veterans all around the U.S.

Social media is also a great way to connect with people you know (or want to know). Put together a clear and concise profile (refer to your resume) and don’t be afraid to “advertise” what you are looking for.

3. Interview with confidence and humility

Interviews are probably the most important part of the job search, and also an area where most military personnel have significant room for improvement (at first). Here are a few things to keep in mind as you navigate your first few interviews:

● Do your homework in advance – Familiarize yourself with the job description and read up on the company’s products and services, leadership, and any recent news or announcements.
● Communicate clearly and concisely why you are right for the role – Refer back to the original work you did around identifying your skills and interests.
● Practice – Ask members of your network to critique your answers to common interview questions, and go on as many interviews as possible for practice.
● Dress for the job – If you are unsure what to wear to an interview, ask what the normal dress code for the office is. When in doubt, err on the side of more professional than casual.
● Don’t use “sir” or “ma’am” – This can come off as overly formal or even intimidating in a corporate setting.
● Be confident and humble – Most people will admire you for your service, but there is also a perception that ex-military men and women can be overly intense and aggressive. Make sure to display humility and willingness to work with others.
● Send a thank-you note – Within 24 hours of the interview, send every person you spoke with a note thanking them for their time and reiterating your interest in the position.
● Don’t get discouraged – Keep in mind that interviewers are also talking with other candidates, and someone else may be more qualified for the role. Focus on treating each interview as a learning experience, whether or not you receive an offer.

Once you understand the process, job hunting essentially becomes a probability exercise: the more jobs you apply for, the more interviews you will get. And the more interviews you do, the more likely you are to be offered a job. Be persistent in expanding your network, identifying new opportunities, and practicing your job-seeking skills, and job offers will follow.

The views and opinions expressed herein are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Morgan Stanley Wealth Management or its affiliates. All opinions are subject to change without notice.

Morgan Stanley Wealth Management is a business of Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC.

© 2019 Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Member SIPC.

The National WWII Museum Commemorates the 75th Anniversary of the End of World War II with a Year of Events

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World War II Museum

On May 8, 1945, World War II in Europe came to an end. As the news of Germany’s surrender reached the rest of the world, joyous crowds gathered to celebrate in the streets, clutching newspapers that declared Victory in Europe (V-E Day). Later that year, U.S. President Harry S. Truman announced Japan’s surrender and the end of World War II. The news spread quickly and celebrations erupted across the United States. On September 2, 1945, formal surrender documents were signed aboard the USS Missouri, designating the day as the official Victory over Japan Day (V-J Day).

V-J Day was especially momentous—the gruesome and exhausting war was officially over—but the day was also bittersweet for the many Americans whose loved ones would not be returning home. “More than 400,000 Americans gave their lives to secure our nation’s freedom, and in the midst of exultation, there was recognition that the true meaning of the day was best represented by those who were not present to celebrate,” said Robert Citino, PhD, Executive Director of the Institute for the Study of War and Democracy at The National WWII Museum.

Seventy five years later, The National WWII Museum will pay tribute to the historic anniversaries, as well as the myriad servicemembers and Home Front workers who helped preserve freedom and democracy. Through a number of events throughout the year—including educational travel tours taking place throughout Europe and the Pacific, distance-learning programs that will broadcast live from the Museum’s new Hall of Democracy, conferences and symposia examining the war’s lasting impact on the world, and a special exhibit that will travel to institutions across the nation—the Museum will reflect on the legacy and meaning of the end of World War II.

See below for a list of The National WWII Museum’s 2020 commemorative initiatives: 

January 31, 2020: 

The Museum’s traveling exhibit So Ready for Laughter: The Legacy of Bob Hope launches a national tour at the National Veterans Memorial and Museum in Columbus, Ohio. So Ready for Laughter tells the story of Hope’s unique place in the history of World War II and beyond, and the contributions he made that still reverberate 75 years later.

February 4, 2020:  

The Manhattan Project Electronic Field Trip, produced by the Museum’s WWII Media and Education Center, will take students nationwide on a virtual, interactive journey to discover the science, sites and stories of the Manhattan Project and the creation of the atomic bomb, which ultimately brought about the end of the war.

February 8, 2020:  

Museum symposium Yalta at 75: From World War to Cold War will feature leading scholars in a daylong discussion about the Yalta Conference—a series of extended strategy sessions between Soviet Union Dictator Josef Stalin, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and US President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The symposium will examine this crucial moment of World War II in detail: the days leading to the conference, the proceedings themselves and the legacies of Yalta for the postwar world, for the Cold War and for today.

February 19, 2020:

The 75th Anniversary of the Battle of Iwo Jima Commemoration Ceremony will take place in the Museum’s US Freedom Pavilion: The Boeing Center. The short ceremony will feature the Marine Band Quintet and Marine Color Guard, as well as a special guest speaker.
March 20-30, 2020:

The Museum is honored to offer the Victory in the Pacific travel program, which provides guests with the unique opportunity to explore Pacific island battlefields and landing beaches in the company of expert historians and WWII veterans. From March 20 through March 30, Victory in the Pacific journeys from Pearl Harbor—where it all started for the Americans—to the islands of Saipan, Guam, Iwo Jima and Tinian, from where the Enola Gay departed to drop the first atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945.

May 2020: 

May 8, 2020 marks the 75th Anniversary of V-E Day. The Museum will commemorate the milestone anniversary by hosting a series of public events at its campus in New Orleans, as well as five educational travel programs throughout Europe, including England, France and Germany. So Ready for Laughter will also open at the New-York Historical Society.

September 2020: 

On September 2, 2020, the Museum will commemorate the 75th anniversary of V-J Day with a number of celebratory events in New Orleans, including a panel discussion featuring WWII veterans, as well as a featured presentation by Clifton Truman Daniel, the oldest grandson of former US President Harry Truman.

September 10-12, 2020:

The Museum’s global conference Memory Wars: World War II at 75 will explore the war’s place in public memory through a global prism, examining how museums, filmmakers, media, memorials and historians (both academic and public) help shape memories of the conflict.

November 2020: 

The Museum’s year of commemorative events will culminate with a celebration in New Orleans featuring 40 WWII veterans and 40 students who will visit the Museum as part of Gary Sinise Foundation’s Soaring Valor program. Museum staff will host the group along with an annual Veterans Day public programming event and Victory Ball, a lavish reception that salutes the men and women who dedicate their lives to freedom.

In addition to commemorating historical anniversaries, the Museum is on the cusp of a major institutional milestone: the 20th anniversary of opening its doors as The National D-Day Museum on June 6, 2000. This coming June, the institution will host a weeklong celebration that will include the annual Dr. Hal Baumgarten D-Day Commemoration Ceremony and will culminate with the Museum’s annual American Spirit Awards gala. WWII veterans and longtime Museum champions and volunteers will also be present.

For ongoing historical content related to the 75th anniversaries and additional information on Museum programs, please visit http://www.nationalww2museum.org

The National WWII Museum tells the story of the American experience in the war that changed the world—why it was fought, how it was won, and what it means today—so that future generations will know the price of freedom and be inspired by what they learn. Dedicated in 2000 as The National D-Day Museum and now designated by Congress as America’s National WWII Museum, it celebrates the American spirit, the teamwork, optimism, courage and sacrifices of the men and women who fought on the battlefront and served on the Home Front. The 2018 TripAdvisor Travelers’ Choice Awards ranks the Museum No. 3 in the nation and No. 8 in the world. For more information, call 877-813-3329 or 504-528-1944 or visit nationalww2museum.org.

The Refrigerating Engineers & Technicians Association and Smithfield Foods Launch Training Program for Veterans Transitioning to Civilian Work

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Veteran Transitioned to Civilian Workforce as a refrigeration engineer

The Refrigerating Engineers and Technicians Association (RETA) and Smithfield Foods, Inc. are pleased to announce RedWhiteandCool, an initiative focused on recruiting, training and hiring transitioning military veterans into the growing and highly sustainable natural refrigeration industry as refrigeration technicians.

Smithfield Foods, the founding sponsor of the program, is dedicated to supporting veterans through employment and philanthropic initiatives like RedWhiteandCool.

“There is a shortage of skilled labor in our country and the commercial and natural refrigeration industry is not exempt from this employment deficit,” said Lois Stirewalt of RETA. “There are currently more than 40,000 jobs open nationally for refrigeration technicians. At the same time, many veterans remain unemployed once they transition to civilian live. RedWhiteandCool is taking action to address this very issue.”

The RedWhiteandCool program will work hand in hand with the Department of Defense and transitioning military personnel, family members and veterans to recruit them into the commercial refrigeration industry. The partnership, administered by RETA’s non-profit arm RETA-Training Institute (RETA-TI) in conjunction with the Department of Defense SkillBridge program, is the organization’s newest and highly innovative Career Skills Program (CSP).

“At Smithfield Foods, supporting the men and women who have served our country is core to who we are as an American company,” said Keira Lombardo, executive vice president of corporate affairs and compliance for Smithfield Foods and president of the Smithfield Foundation. “We owe a debt of gratitude to our veterans; this training and transition program is just one way we demonstrate our appreciation. Partnering with RETA was a natural fit to help connect these veterans with skilled trade jobs at our company and in our industry.”

Transitioning military veterans met yesterday with program staff during an information session to learn more about the training program and refrigeration industry. The free four-week course will begin on Mon., Mar. 23, 2020 at Joint Base Langely-Eustis in Virginia. Participants will receive certification testing at the end of the program and have the opportunity to interview for a career with Smithfield Foods as part of the company’s veteran hiring initiative.

About the Refrigerating Engineers and Technicians Association
The Refrigerating Engineers and Technicians Association (RETA) is the most recognized organization in the country dedicated to the professional development of industrial refrigeration operators and technicians. Founded in 1910, RETA is a non-profit membership and certification organization currently based in Albany, Oregon. The RETA-Training Institute is the 501 c 3 arm dedicated to addressing workforce development issues across the industry.

Ammonia and CO2 features many sustainable benefits. They are naturally occurring green substances with no potential for ozone depletion, and no potential for direct global warming impact. It requires less primary energy to produce a given refrigeration effect than other common refrigerants, has a low replacement cost, and its self-alarming odor helps to detect leaks and minimize emissions.

For more information please visit: www.RETA.com

About Smithfield Foods, Inc.
Headquartered in Smithfield, Va. since 1936, Smithfield Foods, Inc. is an American food company with agricultural roots and a global reach. Our 40,000 U.S. employees are dedicated to producing “Good food. Responsibly.®” and have made us one of the world’s leading vertically integrated protein companies. We have pioneered sustainability standards for more than two decades, including many industry firsts, such as our ambitious commitment to cut our carbon impact by 25 percent by 2025. We believe in the power of protein to end food insecurity and have donated hundreds of millions of food servings to our neighbors in need. Smithfield boasts a portfolio of high-quality iconic brands, such as Smithfield®, Eckrich®, and Nathan’s Famous®, among many others. For more information, visit www.smithfieldfoods.com, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Instagram.

Sailor Spotlight! San Antonio Native Serves with Helicopter Squadron in San Diego

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US Navy sailor standing in front of helicopter

Airman Shunia Barnett-Johnson, a native of San Antonio, TX., joined the Navy to seek better opportunities and to do something different with her life. Now, three years later, Barnett-Johnson serves with Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 3, working with one of the Navy’s most advanced helicopters at Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego.

Barnett-Johnson is an aviation ordnanceman who is responsible for handling and maintaining bombs and missiles to ensure they’re ready for the mission.

“I enjoy meeting different people from many different backgrounds and the pride we take in our job,” said Barnett-Johnson.

Barnett-Johnson is a 2015 George Gervin Academy graduate.

According to Barnett-Johnson, the values required to succeed in the Navy are similar to those found in San Antonio.

“I learned to make better decisions and to accomplish more than what I thought was possible,” said Barnett-Johnson.

With more than 90 percent of all trade traveling by sea, and 95 percent of the world’s international phone and internet traffic carried through fiber optic cables lying on the ocean floor, Navy officials continue to emphasize that the prosperity and security of the United States is directly linked to a strong and ready Navy.

Pilots and aircrew are trained in the squadron to fly MH-60S “Seahawk” helicopters to ensure they are prepared for peacetime and warfighting missions.

Helicopters are equipped with the ability to conduct replenishments at sea, search and rescue missions and support other operations as needed.

According to Admiral Mike Gilday, the Chief of Naval Operations, the focus of today’s Navy is squarely on warfighting, warfighters and the capabilities needed for the Navy of the future.

“I am confident we will maximize the Navy we have today while delivering the Navy that our nation will rely upon tomorrow,” said Gilday. “And we will do so with urgency. Our fleet will be a potent, formidable force that competes around the world every day, deterring those who would challenge us while reassuring our allies and partners.”

There are many opportunities for sailors to earn recognition in their command, community and careers. Barnett-Johnson is most proud of earning her air warfare qualification.

“It required a lot of studying and applying myself,” said Barnett-Johnson. “It was important to not give up or get discouraged.”

As a member of the U.S. Navy, Barnett-Johnson, as well as other sailors, know they are a part of a service tradition providing unforgettable experiences through leadership development, world affairs and humanitarian assistance. Their efforts will have a lasting effect around the globe and for generations of sailors who will follow.

“I love the opportunities to travel and the educational benefits that are available while I am serving my country,” said Barnett-Johnson.

Source: Navy Office Of Community Outreach

Gary Sinise awarded Congressional Medal of Honor Society award for supporting veterans

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Gary Sinise Cover of U.S. Veterans Magazine

The Patriot Award was awarded to the veteran advocate and Forrest Gump actor recently at the Reagan Library in Simi Valley, CA. It’s the highest honor given out by the organization, the Congressional Medal of Honor Society.

Sinise is known for several memorable roles. These include George Milton in Of Mice and Men, Lieutenant Dan Taylor in Forrest Gump (for which he was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor), Harry S. Truman in Truman (for which he won a Golden Globe), Ken Mattingly in Apollo 13, Detective Jimmy Shaker in Ransom, and Detective Mac Taylor in the CBS series CSI: NY(2004–13).

Sinise started off as a rebel and a musician. His parents bought him a guitar when he was a boy, but he noticed everyone was playing guitar, so he switched to bass, which he still plays today.

The hugely popular Lt. Dan Band, which plays mostly rock’n’ roll and country covers that are favorites among troops, has played for service members all over the world. He has spent countless hours raising money to support veterans.

He stresses that veterans are everywhere. You don’t have to put on concerts for thousands; you can support one veteran, and that’s a big deal. “Look within your own neighborhood, your town, your state.”

Read his story here!

What kind of questions should you ask at the end of a job interview?

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man sitting at a desk being interviewed by a man and womanfor a job

It’s a scenario many of us have found ourselves in. You’re nearing the end of a job interview and finally, you can begin to relax a little. Despite the nerves, you’ve come across well and answered all the questions confidently – and with a little bit of luck, you may just be offered the position.

Before you can run out of the room, however, the interviewer wants to know if you have any questions for them.

It might be tempting to say no, so you can leave as quickly as possible – but asking questions can be of huge benefit when it comes to interviewing for a job.

Firstly, it’s important to remember that interviews should always be considered a two-way street. Yes, the recruiter is interested in finding out if your skills and abilities are suited to the role in question. But a job interview is also a chance for you to work out if this is the right job for you – and if you are going to fit in well at the company.

“As candidates, we can often get caught up in the whole process, particularly as we try to remember the answers we’ve prepared but it’s equally as important to take time towards the end of the interview to ask your own questions,” says Row Davies, HR business manager at the recruitment firm Macildowie.

While you’re preparing for your interview and imagining the kind of questions you might be asked, it’s also useful to think about any queries you might have too. However, don’t ask an interviewer anything you can find out easily yourself, either online or on the company’s social media channels.

“It’s crucial for you to assess whether the company is the right fit for you, as just like any relationship, both need to benefit and feel comfortable with the partnership,” Davies says.

“Not only does the process allow you to show your enthusiasm for the company, asking questions also gives you the opportunity to check your goals and values are aligned with the business. You don’t want to be a year or more down the line and find that the company is heading in a direction that you don’t want to or perhaps can’t follow.”

So what kind of questions should you be asking as an interview candidate?

Davies believes there are three key questions that should be on every job applicant’s list.

“The first, is asking the interviewer ‘is there anything regarding my experience you would like me to expand upon?’. Not only does this show that you are engaged, it also provides you with the opportunity to further emphasise your strengths and how you believe these will be an asset to the company’s objectives,” she says.

The second is about learning and development – and specifically, whether the company is actively investing in their employees. After all, you want to know that you’re going to move forward in a job.

“Ask, ‘how do you support the professional development of your employees?’. Answers to this question will give you an insight into how the business will support you as you progress up the career ladder,” Davies says.

“It also shows the interviewer you have aspirations and a drive to succeed in the organization.”

Finally, it’s a good idea to find out more about the company’s environment and whether they look after their employees.

“I would encourage any of my candidates to ask the interviewer, ‘what do you like most about working for the company?’ This is great for building a personal connection with the interviewer, giving them the opportunity to share their personal views and the passion they have for the company,” Davies says.

Continue on to Yahoo News to read the complete article.

100-year-old Tuskegee Airman from Bethesda flips the coin at Super Bowl LIV

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Veteran Charles McGee speaking in to Fox News microphone during Superbowl interview

Col. Charles McGee is still living large at 100 years old. The retired Tuskegee Airman, of Bethesda, helped to flip the coin at Super Bowl LIV on Sunday.

McGee joined three other 100-year-old veterans in the ceremony, which was part of the NFL’s centennial celebration.

McGee is believed to be the oldest living Tuskegee Airman, and also flew two private jets the week of his 100th birthday.

McGee was 22 when he became a part of history in the making.

“I took the exams and passed and all I can say was when I got a call after that first flight I was hooked,” McGee recalled back on his 100th birthday in December. “Back then we didn’t realize what was taking place. We were doing something supporting the country.”

McGee went on to command a squadron and set a record after completing a total of 409 combat missions during World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War. He said his squads all had one goal.

“Our role moving into bomber escort was to save American lives,” he said. “I don’t see myself as a hero. I see myself as one little American that did accomplish something that was helpful.”

McGee’s home in Bethesda is filled with awards, including a Congressional Gold Medal from President George W. Bush and another honor waits in the wings. In July, the Senate passed a bill pushed by Sen. Chris Van Hollen to give McGee an honorary promotion to brigadier general. It now sits before the House for approval for the president’s signature.

His recognition instills pride in his three children, 10 grandchildren, 14 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild.

Continue on to Fox News to read the complete article.

Married couple originally from Brazil graduates U.S. Navy Bootcamp with honors

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Silvia and Rafael Gonclaves pose in U.S. Navy Uniforms

Silvia Ribeiro anxiously waited at the finish line of the 2015 Ironman World Championship in Kona, Hawaii. Her hand grasped a ring. Her thoughts held a marriage proposal.

“Você quer se casar comigo?’ she asked in her native Portuguese, moments after Rafael Ribeiro Goncalves completed the race.

With post-race fatigue briefly giving way to the realization of spending a lifetime with the woman he loved, Ribeiro Goncalves replied yes, between a few exhausted breaths. Their wedding ceremony was presided over by a judge, who also was a runner. Wedding guests, some of whom had just a day’s notice of the hastily arranged ceremony, showed up wearing swim parkas and cycling gear during a break in their tight training schedules.

The Brazilian couple, who moved to the United States in 2015 and resided in Los Angeles, have seldom done things in a conventional way and never have they done them halfway. That, in part, explains their decision to enlist in the U.S. Navy.

Ribeiro Goncalves and Ribeiro were among 1,073 graduates participating in the Jan. 24, 2020 Pass-In-Review graduation ceremony at Recruit Training Command. Graduating was never going to be enough for these two motivated, high-achieving, former professional athletes who were recognized as honor graduates.

As the top graduate in his training group, Ribeiro Goncalves, 39, was awarded the Navy Club of the United States Military Excellence Award (MEA). The MEA is awarded to the recruit that best exemplifies the qualities of enthusiasm, devotion to duty, military bearing and teamwork. Ribeiro, 40, earned the United Service Organization Shipmate Award for best exemplifying the spirit and intent of the word ‘shipmate.’

“Seaman Recruit Ribeiro had given her E-2 collar device to another recruit that advanced, but did not have one,” said Operations Specialist 2nd Class Jenise Collier, one of Ribeiro’s Recruit Division Commanders. “I had brought her out to the middle of the compartment and presented her with new collar devices. She continuously exemplifies the highest standard of honor courage and commitment. She is well on her way to being a superb Sailor in the fleet.”

Joining the Navy is the latest example of how the couple took an idea and, as they had with so much of their civilian lives, ran with it

“I spent my whole life competing or being part of projects that require really high performance, but it was always for myself,” Ribeiro Goncalves said. “I figured late in life what really gets me going is when I’m part of something bigger than myself. Once I realized that, the military was the obvious choice.”

When the couple began entertaining the idea of enlisting in the military, they believed they did not qualify, as they were not U.S. citizens. However, a close friend, U.S. Air Force Maj. Linda Mansolillo, informed them that they could indeed join and apply for naturalization after six months of service.

“A story like ours just goes to show how representative and inclusive the Navy is of the values that created the United States,” Ribeiro Goncalves said. “I want to give back to the U.S. and what it represents.”

Both husband and wife were born in Rio de Janeiro, but they didn’t meet until much later in life.

He became a member of the Brazilian national swim team for 10 years, earning Federation Internationale de Natation (FINA) 400-meter individual medley World Cup medals in 1998 and 2000. FINA is the sport’s international governing body recognized by the International Olympic Committee. He also was a member of the bid committee that brought the Summer Olympics to Rio de Janeiro in 2016.

She became a professional volleyball player, and later a professional triathlete who moved to the United States in 2010. Two years later, she was offered a job opportunity for a one-year contract back in Brazil.

“I started training with the same team Rafael was a part of and we became super good friends as we were both dating others at the time,” said Ribeiro. “We both eventually became single and because we spent long periods training on the bike, and running and swimming, we started getting closer.”

As their budding friendship soon blossomed into a loving relationship, Ribeiro’s contract was about to expire. Seeking better training and sponsorship opportunities in the United States, they agreed to leave Brazil and moved to Boulder, Colorado.

“It was so hard in the beginning as we literally arrived with two boxes of belongings, our bikes, a couple of suitcases and only $3,000-$4,000,” she said. “It was rough in the beginning but we went for it and competed professionally in triathlons.”

In 2017, they moved to Los Angeles and Ribeiro Goncalves became employed as an ocean lifeguard for the Los Angeles Fire Department. He was assigned to Zuma Beach, where lifeguards rescue swimmers at an average rate of one every 10 minutes, according to a story published in the Los Angeles Times.

With their athletic careers nearly finished, they sought fresh challenges and a way to honor their new homeland. Their journey to becoming Navy Seaman Recruits began exactly one year before they stood before friends, family, and several thousand guests as honor graduates.

At a birthday party for their close friend Jim Garfield, who was Ribeiro’s sports agent, Maj. Mansolillo first talked to them about joining the military.

“Those two, particularly, are really great examples of the kind of citizens we want,” said Garfield, who attended their boot camp graduation ceremony. “We want people who are engaged, who recognize the blessing of being an American, who are proactively American — not by birth — but by actual action in what they do, what they believe, and how they act and conduct themselves. That, to me, says a lot. We should all be so lucky to have folks like that protecting us.”

Assigned to separate divisions, the couple did not see each other for nearly two months though their recruit barracks are located less than 1,000 yards apart. Unlike other recruits who can update loved ones with letters and phone calls home, they could not write to or call each other, which would have violated recruit interaction directives.

“The toughest part was to be away from him and not knowing how he was doing,” Ribeiro said. “We’re married and we love to be together all the time. We were training together and doing everything together, so it was very hard not having him by my side doing things together. He is everything for me.”

Fortunately, they found a way to indirectly communicate through Garfield. During their infrequent phone calls home, each would update their friend, who in turn, would pass on the information to the recruit’s spouse.

Though the couple arrived to boot camp about a week apart, they wound up having the same graduation date. For those close to the couple, the news about their success in boot camp was expected.

“Myself, Linda and other people that know them are not surprised,” Garfield said. “For them, it’s go hard or go home. It’s 110 percent for them and they are also so appreciative of the opportunity to be here, to be citizens, and to be together. They are a good example of people who have created their own hope, and they are definitely people who are appreciative of the blessing of the place where they are at.”

The couple’s vast experience as professional athletes seemed to give them a leg up in boot camp as they applied it to their training.

“The main thing they teach us in boot camp is how to work under stress,” Ribeiro said. “Even when you’re tired, you’re still under stress. I had no problems dealing with this because being professional athletes, we’re always under stress and we’re always tired. There was no single day where we were both not moaning about how tired we were when we used to train for the triathlons, so that helped us a lot.”

Ribeiro unexpectedly spotted her husband for the first time in a hallway as they both prepared to go before the award board. Having just completed a 3-mile pride run with her division, she was instructed by her RDCs to quickly shower, dress and head to the board.

“They told me my uniform would be inspected too, so when I turned the corner into the hallway, I was busy looking over my uniform and when I looked up — he was in front of me! I almost had a heart attack!” Ribeiro said. “I looked at him, he looked at me, I was thinking what should I say, what should I do? So, I kind of winked to him and he winked back. We talked with our eyes, ‘I’m so proud of you. I love you so much.’ It was so hard not to cry.”

The following day their RDCs arranged a brief meeting at Captain’s Cup.

“We first found out at the awards board; we didn’t even know his wife was here,” said Aviation Machinist’s Mate Cody Kasian, one of Ribeiro Goncalves’ Recruit Division Commanders. “The fact that she is an award winner as well is truly amazing. They were able to interact at Captain’s Cup, as Sailors, and that was a good thing to see.”

Ribeiro Goncalves, who was assigned the rate of Damage Controlman, will remain at Great Lakes Naval Station for approximately 10 weeks to attend his “A” School. His wife will be in San Antonio, Texas to begin approximately 19 weeks of “A” School training as a reservist Hospital Corpsman. They plan to reunite at Ribeiro Goncalves’ first duty station once their training is complete.

What advice do they have for future couples headed to Navy boot camp?

“A strong relationship makes everything better,” Ribeiro Goncalves said. “I was looking forward to the day I would see her again. I had full confidence that she would be doing well and I’m sure she felt the same. We know each other’s potential.”

“Trust in each other, because it’s hard,” Ribeiro said. “It’s really hard not knowing what’s going on outside of your barracks. Respect each other and realize it’s only temporary; it’s only eight weeks and that’s nothing compared to your whole life.”

Boot camp is approximately eight weeks and all enlistees into the U.S. Navy begin their careers at the command. Training includes physical fitness, seamanship, firearms, firefighting and shipboard damage control along with lessons in Navy heritage and core values, teamwork and discipline. More than 35,000 recruits are trained annually at RTC and begin their Navy careers.

Source: Navyoutreach.com

Workplace Etiquette You Should Know

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Business men in smart casual wear shaking hands in office

How you present yourself to others in the business world speaks volumes. People often form first impressions about others within seconds of first meeting them therefore it is crucial to ensure you are properly prepared to present yourself as a professional. Here are some important tips on dealing with people, communicating, and interacting at meetings that will help you make a good impression.

Dealing with People

How you treat people says a lot about you.

  • Learn names and learn them quickly. A good tip for remembering names is to use a person’s name three times within your first conversation with them. Also, write names down and keep business cards. People know when you don’t know their names and may interpret this as a sign that you don’t value them.
  • Don’t make value judgments on people’s importance in the workplace. Talk to the maintenance staff members and to the people who perform many of the administrative support functions. These people deserve your respect!
  • Self-assess: Think about how you treat your supervisor(s), peers, and subordinates. Would the differences in the relationships, if seen by others, cast you in an unfavorable light? If so, find where the imbalance exists, and start the process of reworking the relationship dynamic.
  • What you share with others about your personal life is your choice, but be careful. Things can come back to haunt you. Don’t ask others to share their personal lives with you. This makes many people uncomfortable in the work space.
  • Respect people’s personal space. This may be very different than your own.

Communicating Effectively

It’s sometimes not what you say, but how you say it that counts!

  • Return phone calls and emails within 24 hours – even if only to say that you will provide requested information at a later date.
  • Ask before putting someone on speakerphone.
  • Personalize your voice mail – there’s nothing worse than just hearing a phone number on someone’s voice mail and not knowing if you are leaving a message with the correct person. People may not even leave messages.
  • Emails at work should be grammatically correct and free of spelling errors. They should not be treated like personal email.
  • When emailing, use the subject box, and make sure it directly relates to what you are writing. This ensures ease in finding it later and a potentially faster response.
  • Never say in an email anything you wouldn’t say to someone’s face.
  • Underlining, italicizing, bolding, coloring, and changing font size can make a mild email message seem overly strong or aggressive.

Navigating Office Meetings

This can easily be the most intimidating part of starting a new job. The environment of a meeting requires some careful navigation to maintain your professional image, whether the meetings are one-on-one, with several colleagues or with external clients.

  • For a meeting in someone’s office, don’t arrive more than five minutes early, as they may be prepping for your meeting, another meeting later that day, or trying to get other work done. You may make them uncomfortable, and that is not a good way to begin your meeting.
  • Don’t arrive late…ever. If you are going to be late, try to let someone know so that people are not sitting around waiting for you. Don’t forget that being on time for a meeting means arriving 5 minutes early – for an interview, arrive 10 minutes early.
  • When a meeting runs late and you need to be somewhere else, always be prepared to explain where you need to be (understanding that the value of where you need to be will likely be judged).
  • Do not interrupt people. This is a bad habit to start and a tough one to end.
  • There is a time and place for confrontation, and a meeting is almost never that place. You will embarrass and anger other people, and you will look bad for doing it. Give people time and space outside of meetings to reflect on issues that need to be dealt with.

Source: Columbia University, Center for Career Education