Would you Buy a House without a Realtor? The Top Five Ways Military Recruiters are like Realtors

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Man in a blue suit sitting at desk with computer paperwork and glass of water

Would you purchase a house without consulting a realtor? What about transitioning out of the military and starting a civilian career without the help of a military recruiter?

Brian Henry, Senior Vice President at Orion Talent, breaks down the top five ways military recruiters are like realtors, and how you can utilize this resource to achieve the best possible outcome – a rewarding career after the military.

A trusted advisor to help steer you in the right direction.

“A realtor knows his/her market, and a good one is going to get to know his/her client and understand their wants and needs, and then offer solutions that align with their stated goals,” Brian explained. “They have years of experience in the market and can advise their client to zero in on the right locations and types of housing that will meet their need.”

Similarly, a military recruiter has experience in their niche of the job market and has worked with hundreds of different companies and types of jobs. “After getting to know a candidate’s background and preferences, they are able to provide insight on the types of roles that the candidate is qualified for and confirm the expected salary ranges and availability of those opportunities in the locations the candidate desires,” Brian stated.

While anyone can browse the internet and search for homes for sale, a realtor will use his/her established network to streamline the process and find “off-market” deals or hot leads on houses that are just coming on the market.

“In a similar manner, job seekers can engage with an experienced military recruiter who will have access to ‘off market opportunities,’ and many other positions that have an urgency to hire,” Brian explained.

Their fees are not paid by you, but by the client companies.

As a home buyer, you get the services of a professional realtor, but their commission is paid by the seller. As a job seeker, you get to tap into the services of a military recruiter and all those their team without having to pay anything for that service.

In the case of military recruiters, the company that ultimately hires you will pay the fee for the services of the military recruiter. “Contrary to some myths, that fee is NOT taken out of your salary. It is a fee negotiated between the recruiting firm and the company that is typically a percentage that is based on your first year’s base salary,” Brian explained. “The higher your salary, the higher the fee to the military recruiter. Truly a win-win scenario!”

They do the heavy lifting.

A realtor will scour the MLS, coordinate with sellers and other agents, and schedule a day of house hunting, getting you access to pre-selected homes to see first hand outside of an open house setting.

With a military recruiter, you can get similar filtered access directly to the decision makers inside a company. “At an Orion Hiring Conference, you are not just attending an ‘open house’ or job fair. You are invited to a professional event with detailed information sessions, interview preparation seminars and scheduled one-on-one interview sessions with the company representatives you have been matched with, based on your background and preferences,” Brian said.

Additionally, military recruiting firms have a staff of Account Executives that are working every day to find new companies with vetted openings. “In the case with Orion, those companies are specifically interested in and want to hire candidates with a military background,” he explained.

They help with every step of the process.

A realtor will work with their client all the way through the process from finding the right home, negotiating and writing up the offer, and finally closing the deal.

A military recruiter is there to do the same thing, from resume and interview preparation, specific company briefings, giving feedback throughout the process, and providing assistance in negotiating and accepting a position. “Another benefit of using a military recruiter is that the military recruiter is likely to have inside knowledge. They may know if you are competing with three other candidates for the same position, give you key advice that helps you win the job, or help you in a situation where you have multiple offers come in at the same time,” Brian added.

They help land your new career – and are there if you need help in the future.

A realtor builds their business based on referrals. They want to put you into a home and deliver a great experience, and their hope is that you will refer your friends. Also, when the time comes for you to sell your home, they hope you will come back to them for your next move.

Similarly, military recruiters thrive on recommendations of past candidates. “The best thing a candidate can do to ‘pay’ the military recruiter for their services is to refer others,” Brian explained.  “The relationship with the military recruiter does not end with taking that first job. We have seen many candidates promoted to Hiring Managers and come back to us looking for people to add to their team. In cases where someone needs to make another career move, they can quickly re-engage with the military recruiter to kick start the next search.”

Source: Orion Talent

Brothers Keep Family Tradition of Army Service

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Three Stovell brothers pose for photo at their training site in Saudi Arabia, 26 June 2019. From left to right: Staff Sgt. Daniel Stovell, Staff Sgt. Daryl Stovell, and Sgt.1st Class Davin Stovell. All three work as training instructors for the U.S. Army Security Assistance Command's Military Assistance Group that advises the Saudi Ministry of Interior. Called MOI-MAG, the DoD program teaches Saudi security forces how to defend their country's critical infrastructure sites like ports, airports, bridges, oil pipeline and refineries. (U.S. Army photo by Richard Bumgardner)

By Richard Bumgardner, USASAC

In 2018, when Sgt. 1st Class Davin Stovell saw a job posted on the Army’s Tour of Duty website, he knew it was tailor fit, not only for himself, but also for his two brothers, Staff Sgts. Daryl and Daniel Stovell.Pictured from left, Staff Sgt. Daniel Stovell, Staff Sgt. Daryl Stovell and Sgt. 1st Class Davin Stovell.

“It was like the advertisement was a list of our qualifications and life experiences,” Davin said, who, like his three brothers and two sisters, grew up as military kids.

The three Stovell brothers, full-time members of the Los Angeles Police Department, who were once in the National Guard and now Army Reserve, applied and were soon accepted.

Davin, who enlisted as an active-duty Army infantryman in 1995, and his brothers, who joined post 9/11, follow a proud military family tradition and legacy of service to the Army.

Five generations of the Stovell family tree have worn Army colors, starting with their great-grandfather, the first Stovell to wear an Army uniform. Their grandfather served in Korea, and their father, Donell Sr., did two combat tours to Vietnam.

A fourth older brother is in the Army Reserve, and their older sister is deployed overseas with the Mississippi National Guard. The family has not only served in the Army but has also served in every Army component.

Altogether, the five generations have completed nine combat tours, with more on the way before their duty to country and service in the Army is complete.

Davin, Daryl and Daniel are serving as military training advisers, assigned to Security Assistance Command’s Ministry of Interior-Military Assistance Group, based in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. As a subordinate organization of USASAC, MOI-MAG’s mission is to build partner readiness that ultimately enhances regional security.

Collectively, the three brothers have already given more than 80 years of public service: 53 in the military and 26 as police officers with the LAPD. And they’re not done yet.

The MOI-MAG program is the only program in the world where a U.S. Department of Defense organization has a train-and-advise partnership with another country’s Ministry of Interior. One of the primary missions of MOI-MAG personnel – who are Army reservists – is training the Facilities Security Force that protect the country’s civil structures and facilities, much like what the U.S. government’s Department of Homeland Security does.

For the Stovell brothers, teaching defensive techniques to a partner force is natural fit. All are trained drill instructors. All have backgrounds in infantry. All have served on deployments in places such as Sinai Peninsula of Egypt, Panama, Germany and Australia. Altogether they have served four combat tours in Iraq.

“Ultimately, it will make the FSF soldiers better at what they do,” Davin said. “We’re trying to give them as much training as we can; training like how to handle a weapon, reflexive fire, clearing a building, establishing a checkpoint, how to do a patrol, conducting vehicle searches at an entry control, and even how to protect themselves if they are physically attacked.”

For Watson, having three brothers, all highly experienced noncommissioned officers, on his team is an interesting story, but he said, “I think what makes it a better story is that the three brothers that I have working for me are fantastic instructors; they are doing an extraordinary job of making FSF soldiers better at what they do.”

Source: army.mil

World’s First Black Fighter Pilot Honored at Museum of Aviation

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Eugene Bullard statue at museum of aviation

WARNER ROBINS, Ga. — Before the Tuskegee Airmen blazed the trail for black military pilots, there was Columbus, Georgia, native Eugene Bullard.

During World War I, while fighting for France, he became the world’s first black fighter pilot. Last week, on what would have been his 124th birthday, hundreds of people honored him at the Museum of Aviation.

A life-sized bronze statue of Bullard was unveiled. Harriett Bullard White, his cousin, became emotional when she saw it.

She was 11 years old when he died and remembers him well. She has been to France many times to visit places related to his service.

“He was, for us, a giant hero,” she said. “No one ever heard of him outside of our family, it seemed, but he was our hero.”

She was among 22 family members from around the country who came for the ceremony, along with five original Tuskegee Airmen. White said it means a lot to the family.

“This is incredible,” she said. “My heart is just so touched from this recognition. He has left a legacy that’s incredible for us, as a family, and now to have the state love him and cheer him on and present the statue. … My happiness and excitement is so big right now.”

Bullard was born in Columbus in 1865, but racial tensions led him to run away from home at an early age, according to a history presented at the ceremony. He took odd jobs along the East Coast, then stowed away on a freighter to France. He joined the French Army when World War I broke out and was in some of the worst fighting. He was severely wounded.

After his recovery, he couldn’t join the infantry again but was given the chance to be a pilot. He went on to have at least two confirmed kills of enemy aircraft. He was awarded 15 medals. German enemies nicknamed him “The Black Swallow of Death.”

He was denied the chance to fly in the U.S. military because of his race. He also fought briefly for France in World War II and returned to the U.S. after he was injured. He died of cancer in New York in 1961. In 1994, President Bill Clinton posthumously made him a second lieutenant in the U.S. Air Force.

Col. Brian Moore, commander of the 78th Air Base Wing at Robins Air Force Base, said Bullard was a hero in many ways.

Continue on to Military.com to read the complete article.

LA’s Only National Cemetery For Vets Is Finally Taking New Applications After More Than 40 Years

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Mebers of the color guard at a military funeral service

For the first time in decades, veterans and local military families have access to a final resting place alongside fellow servicemembers in the city of L.A.

The Los Angeles National Cemetery, closed to new burials since 1978, is once again accepting applications for interment.

“It’s fantastic, and I’m starting to tear up a bit, because I know what it means to the veterans and their family members,” said cemetery director Tom Ruck.

The openings are thanks to a newly expanded columbarium, a series of thick concrete walls with niches to store cremated remains, which opened Oct. 1. As property values climb and space for below-ground burials becomes scarcer, the Department of Veterans Affairs is building more of these high-density memorial structures in cities around the country.

For myriad personal and religious reasons, the columbarium option is not for everyone. Angeleno families who choose a casket burial will still have to drive to Riverside or Bakersfield for the nearest veterans cemetery with room to accommodate new applications.

The L.A. National Cemetery, first put to use in 1889, is home to servicemembers from conflicts dating back to the Civil War. It houses roughly 90,000 graves between Brentwood and Westwood, just east of the 405, north of Wilshire Blvd.

Moviegoers may recognize the solemn white stone markers dotting an immaculate green lawn; film shoots sometimes use the setting as a substitute for Arlington National Cemetery.

The new columbarium niches are behind UCLA’s Jackie Robinson baseball stadium on the West L.A. Veterans Affairs campus, across the freeway from the main cemetery.

The first phase of expansion includes space for about 10,000 veterans, their spouses and qualifying dependent children. The ultimate project should nearly double the capacity of the entire cemetery to 180,000.

Veterans have to meet certain criteria to be eligible for burial in a national cemetery, including being discharged with status other than “dishonorable.” Niche, marker and site upkeep are free of charge, but cremation must be arranged and paid for independently.

Ruck said that applicants can’t reserve specific columbarium niches. “We can’t take reservations,” he said. “We just can’t.”

He expects a bit of a rush from years of pent-up demand. After 40 years of “no vacancies” at the local veterans cemetery, Angelenos who may be holding on to remains in an urn at home can find them a permanent resting place in the new structure.

“I can tell you that there’s a whole lot of people who have mom, or dad or uncle or brother in the closet, just waiting for this to happen,” Ruck said. “We’re going to be able to take care of them with dignity, with honor and with pride.”

Continue on to LA ist to read the complete article.

Getting a haircut at Sport Clips Haircuts now through Veterans Day can Help A Hero

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Sport Clips Help-A-Hero campaign poster

Getting a haircut now through Veterans Day will support service member and veteran scholarships as a part of Sport Clips Haircuts annual “Help A Hero” campaign that kicks off in stores October 14, 2019.

The Help A Hero Scholarship program is designed to reduce the burden of college, graduate and technical school tuition often needed to pursue post-military careers and is administered by the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the U.S. (VFW). The goal this year is to raise $1.5 million toward scholarships in the more than 1,800 Sport Clips Haircuts stores across the country.

In just six years, 1,450 military and student veterans have been awarded Sport Clips Help A Hero Scholarships with the nearly $6.5 million donated to date by Sport Clips Haircuts, its clients and product partners. These scholarships provide up to $5,000 of assistance per semester to help cover the cost of tuition and fees for service members and veterans in the rank of E-5 and below.

“I used my G.I. Bill benefits to obtain my B.A. and even the first three semesters of my M.A. before exhausting my benefits,” says Christopher Mynatt, a U.S. Navy veteran. “The VFW and Sport Clips are the reason I will never have to pay for school out of pocket.”

“These scholarships are making a difference in the lives of so many who have served our country in the military. Right now, there are 165 student veterans attending colleges and certification programs here in the U.S. with the aid of Help A Hero Scholarships,” says Gordon Logan, Sport Clips founder, CEO, Air Force veteran and VFW Life member. “Whether it’s graduate school or beauty school, it’s an honor for us to be able to thank those who serve by helping them toward the degrees and certifications to pursue civilian careers.”

“Our student veterans can face a lot of adversity while pursuing higher education,” said William “Doc” Schmitz, VFW national commander. “With the help of Sport Clips Haircuts and its generous patrons, we’re so pleased to have the opportunity to ensure the financial burden is alleviated during an already stressful time in these veterans’ lives.”

Many locations are also offering free haircuts to service members and veterans with valid military identification check here for participating stores and store hours. Anyone can support the cause by making a donation when checking out at a Sport Clips location. On Veterans Day, November 11, the company donates an additional dollar for every haircare service to the scholarship program, which added more than $100,000 to the total last year and will be even higher in 2019.

About Sport Clips Haircuts

Sport Clips Haircuts is headquartered in Georgetown, Texas. It was established in 1993 and began franchising in 1995. The sports-themed haircutting franchise, which specializes in haircuts for men and boys, offers online check in for clients, and is ranked by Entrepreneur Magazine as one of the “Fastest-Growing Franchises’ and #17 in its “Franchise 500.” There are more than 1,800 Sport Clips stores open in the U.S. and Canada. Sport Clips is the “Official Haircutter” of the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW), offers veterans preferential pricing on haircuts and franchises, and was named a “2018 Best for Vets: Franchises” by Military Times. Sport Clips provides “Haircuts with Heart” through its annual Help A Hero fundraiser that has contributed $7.5 million to the VFW; national partnership with St. Baldrick’s Foundation, the largest private funder of childhood cancer research grants; and other national and local philanthropic outreach. Sport Clips is a proud sponsor of Joe Gibbs Racing’s NASCAR drivers Erik Jones and Denny Hamlin, Dale Coyne Racing with Vasser-Sullivan Indy Car driver Sebastien Bourdais, and partners with numerous NCAA and professional sports teams. To learn more about Sport Clips, visit sportclips.com.

About The Veterans of Foreign Wars

The Veterans of Foreign Wars of the U.S. is the nation’s largest and oldest major war veterans organization. Founded in 1899, the congressionally-chartered VFW is comprised entirely of eligible veterans and military service members from the active, Guard and Reserve forces. With more than 1.6 million VFW and Auxiliary members located in 6,200 Posts worldwide, the nonprofit veterans service organization is proud to proclaim “NO ONE DOES MORE FOR VETERANS” than the VFW, which is dedicated to veterans’ service, legislative advocacy, and military and community service programs. For more information or to join, visit our website at vfw.org.

U.S. Navy celebrates 244th birthday; 5 things to know about the powerful military force

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U.S. Navy ship pictured off the coast

Salute to the United States Navy, which celebrated its 244th birthday on Sunday.

Founded on October 13, 1775, the US Navy describes itself as the “largest, most advanced, and most lethal fighting force the world has ever known.”

In 1972, nearly 200 years after its founding, Adm. Elmo Zumwalt designated October 13 as the Navy’s official birthday.

He ordered the day to be celebrated to “enhance [the] appreciation of our Navy heritage” and encourage “pride and professionalism in the Naval Service”

Here are five things to know about the U.S. Navy:

It’s the country’s second naval fleet

The Continental Congress established the Continental Navy at the beginning of the American Revolution. Its main purpose was to disrupt British supply ships.

On October 13, 1775, the Continental Congress purchased two armed vessels to attack British ships and prevent them from reaching soldiers in the colonies.

Congress passed a resolution creating a committee to oversee the purchase and manage the small, but growing, fleet.

After the US won its independence in 1783, the Continental Navy was disbanded and its remaining ships were sold. Its officers and sailors returned to civilian life.

Before long, the young country began facing threats from pirates and others wishing to disrupt its seaborne commerce. To defend its interests, Congress moved to reestablish a naval fleet. President George Washington signed the Naval Act of 1794 creating a permanent standing US Navy. The Navy was run by the Department of War until Congress established the Department of the Navy in 1798.

It’s the largest navy in the world

Today, the US Navy is the largest naval force in the world.

It boasts more than 330,000 active-duty personnel, and an additional 100,000 on ready reserve, according to the U.S. Navy.

The Navy hosts an impressive fleet of 290 battle force ships. Its fleet consists of aircraft carriers, amphibious assault ships, cruisers, littoral combat ships, destroyers and submarines.

The Navy describes its submarines as “one of the most lethal weapons in the nation’s arsenal” and says they navigate the world’s seas unseen carrying out secret missions.

It names ships after states and national heroes

In 1819, Congress gave the duty and responsibility of naming ships to the Secretary of the Navy.

It’s not an easy as just picking a name. In fact, there’s a long list of rules and regulations that must be followed. For example, all first-class battleships, those armed with 40 guns or more, must be named for the states, and not for any city, place or person until the names of states have been exhausted, according to Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC). The Navy, however, no longer has any battleships in its ship inventory.

Fortunately, the secretary can rely on others for help. Each year, NHCC compiles a list of possible names. The recommendations are based on research and suggestions from military personnel and the public.

It’s a huge honor for a ship to be named after a person. The tribute is usually reserved for naval leaders and national figures who are considered heroes of war or made extraordinary achievements in peace. The Navy’s newest ship, the latest model of destroyer, is the USS Zumwalt, named after that admiral that designated its birthday.

Its SEALs aren’t named for the animals

Navy SEALs are the US Navy’s special operation force. They’re adept at navigating the seas but aren’t named after the semi-aquatic marine mammal that shares that skill.

SEAL stands for Sea, Air and Land — all the places the elite force carries out missions.

In 1961, Adm. Arleigh A. Burke, then serving as chief of naval operations, authorized the creation of SEAL teams to carry out unconventional operations, including capturing or eliminating high-level targets and intelligence gathering.

Sailors hoping to be a SEAL must successfully complete arduous training, including “Hell Week” in which candidates endure a week of constant stressful training with little sleep. Each year about 1,000 candidates start SEAL training, but only 200-250 actually complete it, according the Navy.

It really does have an NCIS

NCIS isn’t just a hit TV show. It’s an actual law enforcement agency.

The Naval Criminal Investigative Service is the civilian federal law enforcement agency that investigates crimes, prevents terrorism and protects secrets for the Navy and Marine Corps.

Continue on to Fox News to read the complete article.

5 Ways to Create an Effective Military-to-Civilian Resume

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man in a suit giving a thumbs up signal

Transitioning from military to civilian life is difficult. Communication is subtle in the civilian world, and that can be tough when you’re used to straightforward and explicit military orders.

When you’re applying for a job, you have to navigate this communication gap. There’s also the additional challenge of learning how to structure a resume when you’ve always, or for a long time, had a Field Service Record to explain your qualifications to superiors.

These five strategies can help you manage the transition by creating a strong  military-to-civilian resume that will land you job interviews.

#1: Reframe your Skills to Target Civilian Employers

As a military veteran, you have many resume skills that civilian employers need. To start, you have certain technical and job-specific skills that qualify you for civilian jobs. You just need to know how to present them effectively.

Military Connection and other organizations have automated tools at your disposal. Military Connections lets you enter your Military Occupational Specialty code or title, or a keyword from that title, and then presents jobs you might qualify for, and how you would use your skills in those jobs.

Additionally, according to researchers from LinkedIn, veterans are more likely than lifelong civilians to be:

  • Reliable team players
  • Strong problem solvers
  • Critical thinkers
  • Team leaders
  • Detail-oriented workers

Don’t underestimate the power of soft skills. They’re even more in-demand than technical abilities for many types of jobs.

#2: Translate Military Jargon into Language that Civilians Can Understand

A civilian human resources manager might not know the difference between a senior noncommissioned officer and a squad leader, or how many people are in a battalion versus a platoon. Use civilian terms like “supervised,” “led,” and “mentored” to indicate your level of responsibility and how you affected the personnel under your command.

Additionally, avoid all military acronyms if you’re applying to a civilian company. Don’t just spell them out; a civilian employer might not understand “Officer Efficiency Reports” any better than they understand “OER.” Translate it to “performance review.” Remember, an employer wants to be confident you understand the civilian workforce.

#3: Open with a Qualifications Summary or Resume Summary

When you’re transitioning from military to civilian work, you’re changing industries. You should start your resume by highlighting those skills and achievements that will transfer best to your new industry.

As an industry-switcher, you should begin your resume with a resume summary or qualifications summary. Both are specific styles of resume introductions that draw attention to your skills or accomplishments rather than your experience.

A qualifications summary:

  • Focuses on skills
  • Uses five or six bullet points
  • Showcases abilities and achievements relevant to your target job
  • Highlights your value to a potential employer

A resume summary:

  • Focuses on your key accomplishments
  • Uses data to quantify these accomplishments
  • Is formatted using bullets with category subheadings

Determine whether your skill set or your various achievements are more marketable to your desired job, and choose the introduction that best reflects you as a candidate.

#4: Use Quantifiable Information to Highlight Your Accomplishments

Regardless of which introduction you end up choosing, fill the body of your resume with numerical data that quantifies your accomplishments. Under each job heading, introduce three to five bullet points, each with the following three-part structure:

  • Action verb
  • Data point
  • Relevant job responsibility

You don’t have to format every bullet point in this order, and it’s more than fine to include two pieces of data under the same bullet. For example:

“Provided safety training to three 150-member companies yearly, increasing compliance and reducing the number of injuries by 23%

The more quantifiable information you can attach to active descriptions of your work, the better an employer will understand that you get results.

#5: Tailor Your Skills and Experience to the Job Posting

Finally, exclude from your resume any information that doesn’t relate to your target job. All resumes should be specific, but tailoring to the position is particularly important for veterans.

Some employers think that a newly discharged or retired veteran is out of touch with the civilian working world, or that military skills aren’t useful in the private sector. You have to show them that this isn’t true.

Adjust your resume a bit for each job posting. It takes extra time, but it also shows an employer that you’re committed to the role rather than someone sending out bulk job applications.

The Takeaway

As a veteran, you have skills that civilians don’t, but employers won’t know it unless you explicitly show them. Take the time to create a military-to-civilian resume that shows all of the ways that you stand out.

Arlington Chosen as Site for National Medal of Honor Museum

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Medal of Honor Museum finalist announcement

Following a nationwide search, Arlington has been selected as the location for the first ever National Medal of Honor Museum. The foundation behind the museum made the recent official announcement.

Arlington beat out Denver, which was also named a finalist city.

“Arlington, Texas is the optimal location to build America’s next national treasure – the National Medal of Honor Museum,” Joe Daniels, President and CEO of the National Medal of Honor Museum Foundation, said in a statement. “All of us at the Museum were simply overwhelmed with the enthusiasm, warmth and level of commitment of those involved, who have worked beyond expectation to have the Museum come to Texas.”
Daniels also noted that 70 Medal of Honor recipients have lived in the region — and that Texas is home to nearly 1.8 million veterans and active duty military.

The museum will be built on land between E-sports Stadium Arlington and Globe Life Park, in the heart of the city’s entertainment district.

City leaders, museum officials, and other dignitaries will hold a formal press conference Friday, where they’ll reveal more details about the project.

“Arlington, Texas is honored to be entrusted as the home of the National Medal of Honor Museum,” Arlington Mayor Jeff Williams said in a statement. “Located in the heart of our nation, we look forward to commemorating the stories of the 3,500 Medal of Honor recipients to educate, inspire, and motivate our youth to understand the meaning and price of freedom. We are excited and humbled to provide a national platform to spread this message throughout our great country.”

The Medal of Honor is the nation’s highest and most prestigious military award, given only to service members who have distinguished themselves with acts of valor during combat.

Since it was first awarded in 1863, only 3,505 service members have ever received the Medal of Honor.

Continue on to NBCDFW News to read the complete article.

For Business Minded U.S. Veterans

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maintenence-worker

The best way to provide good jobs for U.S. veterans is by helping other U.S. veterans to start successful businesses, because veterans like to hire veterans.

They share a camaraderie and respect for each other unlike any other. And they all have been trained how to work together effectively for maximum results.

Six years ago, in order to get more U.S. veterans employed with good wages I began teaching business minded veterans how to start a strong and successful Maintenance company from scratch. I realized that the more veteran owned businesses I created, the more veterans would get hired. I have developed 80 U.S. Military Maintenance businesses since. It has been an overwhelming success! They have earned millions of dollars and are employing thousands of other veterans.

But before I go further, I will introduce myself. Then I will summarize what I will do with you if you choose for me to show you how to start a maintenance business of your own, in just a week.

Many have earned $10 K or more in their first month. There are many U.S. Military Maintenance owners to talk with. You can talk to them personally and listen to their own success stories.

I have been putting on career fairs on military bases for more than a decade. And I have a job board exclusively for businesses seeking to employ U.S. veterans. HirePatriots.com.

It also has a unique job board for residents who want to hire local U.S. military to help with chores, and to provide a way to thank them; and for active duty, veterans and their spouses to earn extra money when needed. – My life has been devoted to serving our US military, veterans, and their families for more than 40 years. My primary focus has been to help provide ways for active duty and veterans to financially support themselves and their families well.

Book Cover of the Patriotic Business PlanI have written a best-selling book: The Patriotic Business Plan: How to Leap Over Your Competition. The book explains how I received voluminous local and national media attention, medals from two US Presidents, and financial support from civic leaders, organizations, and businesses. It was written in 2013 when social networks were exploding and changing the way businesses market themselves and increase profit. It has worked for myriads of businesses across the US and continues to grow in its effectiveness to immediately increase any businesses’ prestige, and bottom line. As its creator, I personally work with you to get your business started and to help you to also leap over your competition.

Learn more about these active duty, veteran and military opportunities and resources at PatriotHearts.

 

Airman Who Was Traveling to Receive Heroism Award Nonchalantly Saves a Choking Baby on the Way

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Airman Kenneth O'Brien stands in uniform

This real-life “Superman” has pulled off every courageous stunt in the books; he has rescued people from a burning car; served on the president’s security team; and he was one of the divers who saved the team of Thai soccer players last year.

Not only that, he had been on his way to receive a medal for his heroism earlier this month when he saved a choking baby on an airplane.

U.S. Air Force Technical Sgt. Kenneth O’Brien is always humble about his acts of heroism, but he was only recently recognized for his valor after he was selected as one of 12 other Airmen who were named the 2019 Outstanding Airmen of the Year.

“I was shocked and never thought I would win,” said O’Brien.

O’Brien had been on an airplane with his family from Okinawa to Dallas to receive the award when he noticed that a 1-year-old child had started to choke. After another passenger failed to clear the blockage in the baby’s throat, O’Brien quickly stepped in to perform CPR and back thrusts. One minute later, the baby had regained consciousness.

O’Brien, who returned to his seat and continued to check on the child throughout the flight, said: “I’m thankful that the child is ok and that I was able to help when the family needed support. I happened to be in the right place at the right time.”

Nevertheless, reporters and military officials have hailed the airman for his consistent talent for saving people’s lives.

“I can’t decide if he’s Superman or Mayhem (the guy on the insurance commercials),” joked Lieutenant General Jim Slife in a Facebook post.

“He’s on the President’s security detail during his summit with North Korea’s Kim Jong Un,” he continued. “He pulls a person from a burning car in Korea. He saves a Thai Navy SEAL during the Thai cave rescue mission. During that mission, he’s the furthest American in the cave, successfully rescuing the Thai [soccer players] who’d been trapped for days.

“So, he’s rightfully recognized as one of the Air Force’s 12 Outstanding Airmen of the Year. AND THEN… on his flight back to the states from Okinawa last weekend for the AFA Convention to be recognized, an infant starts choking and stops breathing. Our man OB leaps into action, clears the breathing passage, resuscitates the kid, hands him back to the parents, and then goes on about his business.

Continue on to the Good News Network to read the complete article.

Keith Craig has been named CEO and President of Clever Talks

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Keith Craig CEO Clever Talks at a promotional event wearing a black suit and smiling

With notable speakers such as Rob O’Neill, Jocko Willink, Marc Cuban and Marcus Luttrell, Clever Talks brings the hard earned, practical lessons of real-world heroes to anyone who seeks to be better.

Craig served in the US Army for 32 years, working his way up to Sergeant Major, the highest-ranking non-commissioned officer in the Army. In addition to six combat campaigns, Craig’s service took him to 50 countries, where he conducted humanitarian, and natural disaster operations, played professional football and oversaw the creation of senior enlisted training programs.

Craig’s 50+ awards for military service include the Legion of Merit, three Bronze Stars (for three separate combat tours), the Meritorious Service Medal, the Army Commendation Medal, and the Army Achievement Medal. The Legion of Merit is one of the most prestigious awards in the US armed forces – it is one of only two decorations issued as neckwear, with the other being the Medal of Honor.

After retiring from the Army, Craig joined Walt Disney Studios as a Sales Manager, where he and the Disney Theatrical Sales and Distribution Team handled a record-breaking slate of 2019 films, including the highest-grossing movie of all time, Avengers: Endgame. Craig also became co-President of Salute, a Disney organization that provides support to veterans and their families.

Sponsored by the Marc Cuban Foundation, Clever Talks is a nonprofit organization that teaches skills and lessons of U.S. military and first responders to the general public through a free online library.

For more information about Clever Talks, how to support and get support, visit CleverTalks. For interviews contact Tara Thomas, G2 Tour Publicist, Tara Thomas Agency, King Harris Publicist at 812-558-8882.