Students In The Workplace Keep Industry And Academia On The Cutting Edge

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veteran student

When college students can spend several months at top international firms like Goldman Sachs, they naturally come away with valuable résumé-building experience. But what’s often left out of the conversation is the value that students inject back into the business.

Joseph Camarda, a managing director in private wealth management at Goldman Sachs in San Francisco, cited this mutually beneficial exchange when explaining why the company has partnered with Drexel University in Philadelphia to place 145 students in cooperative education positions at its U.S. offices since 2014.

“They bring a young, vibrant, innovative mind to the team and that adds a value that we want to use over and over,” he said.

By collaborating with businesses, colleges and universities can deliver on the promise of relevance for career-minded students. From co-ops and internships, to mentoring and research opportunities, they can also invigorate programs on campus and bring value to firms.

Ashley Inman, a human resources expert who has worked with college interns in several industries, recalled one intern at a construction firm who developed an app for the company to better track inventory — a strategic innovation that helped streamline sales.

“Organizations can get stuck in their ways,” she said. “The value that the students bring is a fresh perspective.”

It’s part of the reason Goldman values its partnership with the university today — 13 years after the co-op relationship began with just a few students in the company’s Philadelphia office. A number of graduates since that time have gone on to work for Goldman full-time.

“The work ethic of these students is just phenomenal,” Camarda said. “It shows up every day.”

Real-Life Reciprocity

Students, in turn, bring valuable perspectives back to campus with them – including “bottom-line” urgency that can sometimes be lacking in academia, said Inman, who sits on the talent acquisition panel of the Society for Human Resource Management.

Strong and meaningful links to industry can inform curricula and programming on campus – helping to make sure academic offerings remain relevant to the needs of industry and students seeking jobs.

Higher education, however, has typically struggled to create and maintain those links, leading to a skills gap that leaves companies with jobs they can’t fill and students who can’t get jobs.

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

Number of Female Generals, and Admirals Has Doubled Since 2000

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As more women pursue careers in the military, their numbers in the senior enlisted and officer ranks have increased dramatically, according to a report released last week by the Service Women’s Action Network (SWAN).

In 1988, less than 4% of those in the three senior enlisted paygrades (E7 to E9) were women. But as of February 2018, women constituted 11.8% of the E7 to E9 ranks in the Army; 20.3% in the Air Force; 11.6% in the Navy; 5.6% in the Marine Corps; and 8.7% in the Coast Guard, the report states.

There was a similar trend among senior officers, according to the report, titled “Women in the Military: Where They Stand.”

Through the 1980s, women made up less than 2% percent of colonels and Navy captains, but the figures as of February 2018 were 10.6% for the Army; 11.6% for the Navy; 14.1% for the Air Force; 2.3% for the Marine Corps; and 11% for the Coast Guard, according to the report.

In February 2018, there were 63 female admirals and generals on active duty in the five services, compared to 30 in fiscal 2000, the report states.

Retired Navy Capt. Lory Manning, who compiled the SWAN report, said “a lot more women are staying in the military, and staying longer,” resulting in their increased presence in the senior enlisted and officer ranks.

For the complete article, continue on to Military.com.

 

Would you Buy a House without a Realtor? The Top Five Ways Military Recruiters are like Realtors

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Man in a blue suit sitting at desk with computer paperwork and glass of water

Would you purchase a house without consulting a realtor? What about transitioning out of the military and starting a civilian career without the help of a military recruiter?

Brian Henry, Senior Vice President at Orion Talent, breaks down the top five ways military recruiters are like realtors, and how you can utilize this resource to achieve the best possible outcome – a rewarding career after the military.

A trusted advisor to help steer you in the right direction.

“A realtor knows his/her market, and a good one is going to get to know his/her client and understand their wants and needs, and then offer solutions that align with their stated goals,” Brian explained. “They have years of experience in the market and can advise their client to zero in on the right locations and types of housing that will meet their need.”

Similarly, a military recruiter has experience in their niche of the job market and has worked with hundreds of different companies and types of jobs. “After getting to know a candidate’s background and preferences, they are able to provide insight on the types of roles that the candidate is qualified for and confirm the expected salary ranges and availability of those opportunities in the locations the candidate desires,” Brian stated.

While anyone can browse the internet and search for homes for sale, a realtor will use his/her established network to streamline the process and find “off-market” deals or hot leads on houses that are just coming on the market.

“In a similar manner, job seekers can engage with an experienced military recruiter who will have access to ‘off market opportunities,’ and many other positions that have an urgency to hire,” Brian explained.

Their fees are not paid by you, but by the client companies.

As a home buyer, you get the services of a professional realtor, but their commission is paid by the seller. As a job seeker, you get to tap into the services of a military recruiter and all those their team without having to pay anything for that service.

In the case of military recruiters, the company that ultimately hires you will pay the fee for the services of the military recruiter. “Contrary to some myths, that fee is NOT taken out of your salary. It is a fee negotiated between the recruiting firm and the company that is typically a percentage that is based on your first year’s base salary,” Brian explained. “The higher your salary, the higher the fee to the military recruiter. Truly a win-win scenario!”

They do the heavy lifting.

A realtor will scour the MLS, coordinate with sellers and other agents, and schedule a day of house hunting, getting you access to pre-selected homes to see first hand outside of an open house setting.

With a military recruiter, you can get similar filtered access directly to the decision makers inside a company. “At an Orion Hiring Conference, you are not just attending an ‘open house’ or job fair. You are invited to a professional event with detailed information sessions, interview preparation seminars and scheduled one-on-one interview sessions with the company representatives you have been matched with, based on your background and preferences,” Brian said.

Additionally, military recruiting firms have a staff of Account Executives that are working every day to find new companies with vetted openings. “In the case with Orion, those companies are specifically interested in and want to hire candidates with a military background,” he explained.

They help with every step of the process.

A realtor will work with their client all the way through the process from finding the right home, negotiating and writing up the offer, and finally closing the deal.

A military recruiter is there to do the same thing, from resume and interview preparation, specific company briefings, giving feedback throughout the process, and providing assistance in negotiating and accepting a position. “Another benefit of using a military recruiter is that the military recruiter is likely to have inside knowledge. They may know if you are competing with three other candidates for the same position, give you key advice that helps you win the job, or help you in a situation where you have multiple offers come in at the same time,” Brian added.

They help land your new career – and are there if you need help in the future.

A realtor builds their business based on referrals. They want to put you into a home and deliver a great experience, and their hope is that you will refer your friends. Also, when the time comes for you to sell your home, they hope you will come back to them for your next move.

Similarly, military recruiters thrive on recommendations of past candidates. “The best thing a candidate can do to ‘pay’ the military recruiter for their services is to refer others,” Brian explained.  “The relationship with the military recruiter does not end with taking that first job. We have seen many candidates promoted to Hiring Managers and come back to us looking for people to add to their team. In cases where someone needs to make another career move, they can quickly re-engage with the military recruiter to kick start the next search.”

Source: Orion Talent

Sailor Spotlight! Navy Information Systems Technician Participates in Humanitarian Efforts in Malaysia

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Steven Maciel

By Chief Mass Communication Specialist Stacy D. Laseter

MALAYSIA, Philippines – Navy Information Systems Technician 3rd Class Steven Maciel, a native of Yorba Linda, California, is participating in Pacific Partnership, the largest annual multinational humanitarian assistance and disaster relief preparedness mission in the Indo-Pacific region.

As a member of the Pacific Partnership 2019 team, Maciel is one of more than 500 U.S. service members, volunteers and partner nation personnel taking part in a variety of projects including medical training, veterinary services, engineering projects, disaster response scenarios, and a variety of community outreach engagements.

“Joining the U.S. Navy has been one massive adventure, I never thought I’d learn so much in less than two years of being in,” Maciel said. “I’m proud to be able to serve my country while gaining a wide range of life experiences.”

Pacific Partnership is the U.S. Navy’s humanitarian and civic assistance mission conducted to work collectively with host and partner nations to enhance regional interoperability and disaster response capabilities and foster new and enduring friendships across the Indo-Pacific region.

Source: Navy Office of Community Outreach

Communicating with Veterans in the Workplace—A Guide for Supervisors And Managers

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female supervisor shaking hands with veteran employee

Creating a well-functioning and welcoming work environment for veteran employees can improve the work environment for all employees. Effective communication has been shown to lead to improved performance and morale.

Following is a list of communication tips that managers or supervisors may find helpful when bringing veterans on board at work.

General Communication

Be straightforward and direct in both written and spoken communication.
✪ Listen when you are not speaking. Paraphrase and reflect back what someone has said to make sure you understood correctly.
✪ Keep your voice volume at a moderate level.
✪ Avoid using an angry, threatening, or demeaning tone of voice.

Assigning Tasks

✪ Be clear about your expectations. Specify what you expect an employee to do or accomplish with a task.
✪ Consider giving written instructions or expected outcomes of a task.
✪ If you are unsure about your clarity, ask the employee to summarize what you have said and are requesting of them. Confirm or correct the employee’s response.
✪ Clearly designate responsibility for tasks and projects, especially when assigning a task or project to a team of employees.
✪ When assigning work to a team, make sure there is an identified leader or point person.
✪ Make sure deadlines are clear and manageable.

Communicating Limits and Standards

✪ Set clear limits and observe them. Be consistent.
✪ Be clear about standards for promotion.
✪ Give praise and recognition for work well done.
✪ Be clear about the consequences of unacceptable behavior.
✪ When correcting an employee, that at the base when you get your discharge papers, and learn to ask for everything. Asking for an opportunity shows you are eager and motivated to get to work. While not second nature, this mindset will pay dividends.describe what can be observed, not what you suspect.

Managing Conflict

✪ Do not avoid or ignore conflict.
✪ Have a plan or process for managing conflict. Make sure employees know this plan so they can act appropriately when conflict arises.
✪ Check with your Human Resources office to see if your company already has a protocol for how to deal with conflict, or if there is someone to help deal with conflict in the workplace (e.g., an ombudsman).
✪ Have the discussion in a neutral setting that allows for privacy (e.g., a conference room with a door).
✪ Identify the goal of the discussion (e.g., gathering information, generating a solution) and stick to the goal.
✪ Focus on the facts and the identified problem.
✪ If multiple people are involved, let each person have time to describe what he or she sees as the problem. Use a time limit if needed.
✪ Listen actively and paraphrase what was said. Ask for clarification when needed.
✪ Do not focus on emotions or the person.
✪ Use objective, professional language.
✪ Avoid judgmental comments or making generalizations.
✪ Do not interrupt or let others interrupt.
✪ When generating possible solutions, be flexible and offer options when possible.

How to Address a Performance Problem

✪ Identify the changes in performance that need to take place for the employee to be successful.
✪ Meet with the employee to discuss the performance problem or deficiency. Do not wait until a performance review. Use a private setting (e.g., an office with a door) in order to protect confidentiality and to maintain the employee’s dignity.
✪ When meeting with the employee, explain, in detail, the performance issues and explain why it is important for the performance to improve and meet the job standards. Be specific. Stick to the facts. Have documentation available. Discuss the performance issues and behaviors, not the person.
✪ Gain agreement on the deficiencies and agreement on the standards the employee must achieve.
✪ Focus on the performance standards required for the job.
✪ Agree on solutions and ask what the employee needs to perform the job successfully, such as more training or other resources. Agree on the plan and the time frames expected for improving the performance.
✪ Advise the employee of the consequences if the performance does not improve.
✪ Set up regular feedback meetings with the employee to discuss the progress (i.e., every Friday to go over the week’s results).
✪ If the employee does not meet the expectations outlined in the plan, consult with your Human Resource office and follow your company policies and procedures on the next steps (e.g., written warning, suspension).

Source: va.gov

3 times you can skip the cover letter—and the 1 time you absolutely shouldn’t

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young man typing a cover letter

Some job listings will say “cover letter required,” while others don’t include any mention about it at all. When it comes to the ladder, many applicants often wonder, Should I submit one in anyway?

It’s a competitive job market out there, and hiring managers and job recruiters today spend about six seconds reviewing each resume. According to Glassdoor, a job search and salary comparison website, approximately 250 resumes are submitted for each corporate job listing, and only five or so candidates will be called for an interview.

So when is it necessary to send a cover letter? Here’s the thing: Hiring managers love them — they get you noticed quickly, show you’ve gone the extra mile and demonstrate how much you really want the job.

A bad cover letter, however, can hinder your objectives.

Don’t submit a cover letter if…

1. You have no interest in personalizing the cover letter
Many applicants will Google “cover letter examples,” pick one in a rush and model their cover letter after it. By doing so, not only will it be evident that you submitted a cover letter designed for mass distribution, but you might have overlooked some mistakes, like addressing the letter to the wrong person, company or even listing the wrong position you’re applying for. (Trust me, this is something hiring managers see all the time, and it’s absolutely cringing. It also takes away from their valuable time that could be spent reviewing your resume.)

2. You don’t have anything new to say
Hiring managers expect to read a compelling and impressive cover letter, not an exact replicate of your resume. (Think about how you felt when writing your personal statement for all those college applications; it was a big deal and you knew the admissions office were looking for someone who they’d feel proud to have representing their school). It’s no different with cover letters. Do you have any unusual hobbies that led you to be interested in the field of work you’re applying for? Is there a backstory that explains why you admire the company? Whatever you write, just don’t elaborate on your job history and skills (that’s what the resume is for).

3. You only have ideas on how to improve the company
Save the problem-solving suggestions for the job interview (that is, if you’re luck enough to get one), when you’ll 100 percent be asked those similar questions (i.e., “what would you improve about [XYZ]?”). A cover letter can be used as an opportunity to demonstrate your job knowledge, but don’t use it as an outlet to tell your prospective employer what they are doing wrong and how to fix it. No one likes hearing negative things about their business from a stranger, even if your feedback has merit. Curiosity, humility and tact will trump a “know-it-all” every time. Focus on the positive aspects and potential solutions for the business.

When to include a cover letter

Notwithstanding the above, the only time you should submit a cover letter is when you have valuable information to share that’s not conveyed in your resume. I’ve hired many candidates based on something that stood out in their cover letter.

Here are some examples:

1. A personal connection or referral
If you were personally introduced to a hiring manager (or someone high up in the company), always acknowledge that relationship in a cover letter. Who made the introduction? How you know them? Why did they think you are a good fit for the role? A personal referral goes a long way, so don’t miss out on capturing the advantage.

2. You have a history with the company or hiring team
If you have any link to the organization, it’s essential to connect the dots. Did you intern at the company? Did you cross paths when you worked for a supplier, a competitor or even a team member in a previous company? You never want to surprise the recruiter and have them hear about the connection from someone else; getting ahead of it will make you an exciting candidate and demonstrate that you’re a transparent and a proactive communicator.

Continue on to Yahoo News to read the complete article.

Crafting Killer Veteran Resumes For Civilian Employment

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recruiting and sourcing veterans

By Russ Hovendick

I review more than 200 resumes every day, and I notice that those from military folks have common pitfalls. What happens when these types of resumes find their way to a civilian employer’s desk? In most cases, they end up in the trash bin or buried in the inbox.

Your skills and talents are too valuable to end up in “no man’s land,” so give employers a reason to hold onto your resumes.

What follows are some of the common mistakes I see in military resumes.

Acronyms and Military Jargon—Ditch Them
After spending any amount of time in the military, I’m sure it’s natural for military acronyms to become part of your everyday vernacular. But when you use acronyms in your resume and any other communications with civilian employers (e.g., e-mails, phone calls, job interviews), you’re speaking a foreign language. Employers don’t want to have to ask or research what an acronym represents. It’s your responsibility to make sure you’re conveying information clearly. To be frank, it’s more annoying than anything else to see an acronym in a resume. It shows the applicant’s laziness and inability to anticipate that the acronym might be a stumbling block for the employer.

For example, here’s a line taken from the top section of a military resume: “I am a certified DOD mediator to hear EO complaints.” Leave the certification for the bottom of the resume. In the body, the employer is more interested in hearing about the quality of work you’ve done. Here is what he’s probably thinking: Tell me the details of your work as a mediator. Give me a glimpse of the types of disputes you mediated and how you resolved them. And, by the way, I know DOD means Department of Defense, but what the heck is an “EO complaint”?

Too Many Numbers,Too Little Explanation
Numbers are a good thing. If they demonstrate something meaningful about your previous experiences (e.g., you introduced a new policy that reduced processing time by 30 percent), include them. But often in the military, some numbers are so intimidating that they deplete the importance of the accomplishment you’re trying to showcase. For example, if a veteran says he oversaw 200 soldiers, the employer would know he couldn’t have possibly had much personal contact with all 200 of them. But if he mentioned that he trained five sergeants to lead their groups of 40 soldiers each, the statement is more meaningful.

Overemphasis on Technical Skills—Show Your Soft Skills
If you’re applying for a technical position, your resume should play up your technical skills. But you’re not a robot. You drive that fuel your technical aptitude. Make sure that comes across in your resume. No matter what job you’re applying for, employers want to see soft skills, too, such as leadership style, communication skills, motivation to make a difference and more.

Lengthiness, Longwinded Language—Be Concise, Get to the Point
No matter how many years of experience you’ve had, no one should have a resume that’s more than two pages long. If you’re applying for a technical job and want to highlight specific projects, I recommend attaching a separate sheet of case studies or projects. You never want the person reviewing your resume to feel frustrated, overwhelmed or lost. A reviewer who gets bored reading your resume might get the impression you’re dull or bland. A reviewer who gets confused reading your resume might think you’re not a clear communicator or simply not bright. The best way to avoid conveying this impression is to be concise. Get straight to the point. Use action words to bring life to the resume and by using as few words as possible. Every word on your resume occupies valuable space. Don’t waste space on meaningless words. You don’t even need full sentences—use bulleted lists where appropriate.

“So, What?” Statements—Tell Me Why It Matters
Sometimes, I read a statement in a resume and think to myself, “So, what?” Then, I prod the candidate for more information and realize that he or she simply didn’t highlight the significant part of that experience. Former Marine Nolan Ruby gave this great advice: Employers just don’t know how to interpret military accomplishments into their own private companies. It’s up to you to explain it.

Highlighting Decades of Military Service Makes You Look Old
It’s perfectly understandable that you might feel proud of having served, say, 20 years in the military. But don’t create additional hurdles through misconceptions by explicitly stating at the top of your resume that you had a 20-year career in the armed forces. When employers see that a person has held a position for a couple of decades, they automatically assume the candidate must be old when, in fact, the individual could be as young as 38 if he or she joined right out of high school. Let the employers see your skills and experience first, and do the math later. Don’t give them an easy reason to reject you. If you’ve spent many years in the military, I recommend writing “extensive experience,” instead of the number of years served.

Create Multiple Resume Versions
If you are looking for jobs in multiple industries, you’ll need to tailor your resume for each industry. We’ve already pointed out the different languages of the military and civilian worlds. Now, think of the various industries in the same way. Law firm staffers talk very differently from tech startups. People in the medical field use different terminology from people in manufacturing. The more you know about your ideal employers, the better you will be at determining what they are looking for, and therefore, what to include in your resume.

Use a Hybrid Profile-Objective-Company Heading
I often see resumes with the applicant’s objective listed at the top. Here’s a typical example:
“To secure employment as a project manager at an information technology firm.” As an executive recruiter who knows how hiring managers think, I find this type of statement unhelpful. It tells the employer what you want, not what you can offer. On the other hand, I’ve also seen resumes with a profile heading that highlights key skills, qualifications or summarizes the applicant’s experience in a sentence. The profile heading can be helpful, but it runs the risk of repeating items included in the resume. Consequently, I propose a hybrid model that incorporates the applicant’s profile, his or her objective and a complimentary description of the company the applicant is applying for. Here’s an example of the hybrid profile-objective-company heading: “Electrical designer with expertise in automation and relay logic systems searching for an innovative manufacturing company.”

Lacking Education? Highlight Your Professional Development
If you’ve never completed high school or college and you’re wondering what to list in the education section of the resume, no need to worry. I recommend following the advice from Monster resume expert Kim Isaacs: Create a professional development section in which you highlight vocational training, certifications, courses and even seminars or conferences you attended. If you did not complete high school but passed the GED, don’t include the GED on your resume. Employers tend to assume that candidates graduated from high school. You may hear differing opinions from other career counselors, but I firmly believe it’s better not to highlight the fact that you did not earn a high school diploma.

Creating a killer resume takes a lot of thought, time and effort … but the more work you put into creating your resume, the more success you’ll see.

Source: Quintessential Careers

Veterans surprise D.C. elementary school with makeover

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When the children at Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary in Southeast Washington left school on Friday, they had no idea what would happen there before their return on Monday.

But on Saturday, 150 volunteers stormed into the empty building with the efficiency of a military platoon and got to work.

They painted the drab brown linoleum-tiled stairwells red, blue and yellow. Drew clouds on the ceiling tiles of the library. Created murals. Planted flowers in front of the school. Left inspirational messages in the bathroom stalls. Built Ikea furniture to revamp the teacher’s lounge. The list goes on.

And the volunteers completed their mission in a single afternoon.

“They are going to be so surprised and really excited,” said Angel Hunter, the principal of King Elementary, which serves about 380 students in preschool through fifth grade. “It boosts teacher and student morale.”

For the complete article, continue on to Washington Post.

Attracting and Sourcing Veterans—Help for corporations looking for the right veteran for the job

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recruiting and sourcing veterans

By Institute for Veterans and Military Families at Syracuse University

Some organizations, such as TriWest, GAE, and the Combined Insurance Company of America, appoint a key veteran staff member to lead efforts in recruiting high-potential veteran candidates transitioning from military service to the private sector. This person understands military and corporate culture and can help HR and hiring managers understand military culture and service.

However, general recruiting efforts may not reach prospective employees with disabilities, so advertising with disability organizations, vocational rehabilitation programs, and disability-related job fairs are good ways to reach potential employees with disabilities.

Another means for attracting veterans is to develop marketing materials that help translate and transfer military skills/experience into civilian job responsibilities. Organizations that have focused veteran recruiting strategies leverage military classification codes in their application materials and jobs postings. These codes specify an individual’s job and rank, and often include additional qualifications, such as languages or specialized training.

Numerous organizations offer specialized websites for veterans, including AT&T, Amazon, Disney, JPMorgan Chase, Microsoft, Sodexo, T-Mobile, and Walmart Inc. Military recruitment channels, career fairs, and other similar events are additional avenues where businesses can share their employment opportunities and veterans can explore whether there’s a match with their skills and experience. Businesses can showcase their job opportunities along with the benefits of joining their organization, while veterans have the opportunity to demonstrate they are some of the most qualified talent in the nation.

Partnerships with business and trade associations represent another important channel for recruiting veteran talent, as well as a means for communicating the value of veterans in the workforce. Leveraging community collaboration and networking with other firms are excellent means for sourcing veterans. Encouraging inter- and intra-industry collaboration to identify and utilize the most comprehensive military skills translators creates more effective placement. The 100,000 Jobs Mission, a coalition of 41 companies committed to hiring at least 100,000 veterans by 2020, is an example of private-sector collaboration contributing to improved recruiting practices and outcomes.

JPMorgan Chase has instituted a “High-Touch Gold Desk,” where recruiters respond to any veteran applicant within five days of receiving the individual’s application for employment. This high-touch approach is positioned to support veterans in finding the right opportunity at JPMorgan Chase, based on the applicant’s experiences and qualifications. In addition, this personal response to each and every applicant has the benefit of helping the company’s HR staff become better educated as to how military skills and experiences correlate to the firm’s different work roles. The program functions by utilizing integrated, regional teams that map veteran applications against available positions at the firm. Using those maps, the teams are able to identify positions across the firm that best match the veteran’s skills profile. This results in a process that aligns the veteran with an opportunity where he or she is most likely to find success and also facilitates an approach to recruitment and hiring that looks across lines of business, as opposed to within a given organizational silo.

Other examples of focused military recruiting are at BAE and the Lockheed Martin Corporation. BAE provides career pathways for wounded warriors through its Warrior Integration Program (WIP), which is specifically designed to identify, hire, and develop qualified wounded veterans into valuable employees. Lockheed participates in the Army Partnership for Youth Success Program (PaYS), which allows those who serve our country to plan in advance to explore private-sector job opportunities. The program gives new soldiers the opportunity to select a job with a PaYS partner during the time of enlistment. After the position has been selected, a Statement of Understanding is signed, and the PaYS employer/partner promises to interview the returning solider, as long as he or she receives an honorable discharge, is otherwise qualified, and a job vacancy exists.

Many companies, including Walmart, leverage campus recruiting and veteran service organizations, such as the Student Veterans of American (SVA). Ernst & Young organizes veteran internship fairs at schools, while AT&T leverages internships that provide veterans job shadowing opportunities.

Following are other resources positioned to support employers with veteran-focused recruiting and onboarding initiatives.

U.S. DOL Vet Employment (VETS)

VETS proudly serves veterans and service members by providing resources and expertise to assist and prepare them to obtain careers, employment opportunities, and employment rights, as well as information on transition programs. VETS offers a multitude of resources for veterans looking for jobs.

Joining Forces

Joining Forces is a great resource and offers some of the nation’s top job resources for veterans and employers, such as access to the Veterans Job Bank, links to employment tools, like My Next Move for Veterans, and many more.

Virtual Career Fair for Veterans

This event includes military-friendly employers that represent thousands of available job opportunities for veterans.

U.S. Veterans Pipeline

An effort of the 100,000 Jobs Mission, the U.S. Veterans Pipeline is a talent networking and career management platform that allows users to connect directly to peers, companies, jobs, schools, education programs, and more.

Gold Card Initiative

This joint initiative between DOL’s Employment and Training Administration (ETA) and VETS provides post-9/11 era veterans with intensive and follow-up services, necessary for success in today’s job market. Eligible veterans can present their Gold Card at any One-Stop Career Center to obtain enhanced intensive services that include up to six months of follow-up, job readiness assessment, referral to job banks, and much more.

100,000 Jobs Mission

JPMorgan Chase and the other founding corporation/coalition members are committed to working together, sharing best recruiting and employment practices, and reporting hiring results.

Hero Health Hire

This initiative is a gathering place where business leaders, government officials, and concerned citizens can learn, share information, and commit to helping our nation’s disabled veterans find and retain meaningful employment. This initiative provides information, tools, and guidance for recruiting, hiring, training, and supporting disabled veterans in the workplace.

Hire Heroes USA

Hire Heroes USA (Hire Heroes) is dedicated to creating job opportunities for U.S. military veterans and their spouses through personalized employment training and corporate engagement.

Military Spouse Corporate Career Network

Offers virtual and in-person meetings or webinars, helping military spouses with resumes, employment resources, training to update skill sets, and assistance in finding employment resources in their current location or the area to which they’re relocating.

Source: toolkit.vets.syr.edu

Stuck on Writing a Resume? Follow these tips

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Resume Tips

By Erik Bowitz

Veterans face a particularly tough challenge compared to most unemployed people when it comes to resume writing and marketing themselves for job openings.

While difficult, translating a military resume into a civilian resume is far from impossible, and if anyone can take on the challenge, it’s an American veteran. Experience as a veteran will be an advantage in today’s competitive job market. Below are just a few tips that will hopefully aid in your resume writing process and give you a bump-up on the competition.

1 Choose a mission, set an objective.

The biggest mistake all job seekers make is using one generic resume for every job they apply to. This is a tactically faulted approach, as each position will most likely be seeking a slightly different job candidate. For this reason, your resume should be specifically targeted to each job position. Don’t be a generalist but a master of what is being sought by the employer.

Include a career objective at the beginning of your resume in which you clearly define your goal and the position being sought. Using one generic career objective for all jobs applied to will ensure you won’t stand out for any.

2 Remember, Civilians Don’t Speak Jargon

Most employers will not understand even some of the most basic of military lingo, including acronyms or systems knowledge specific to military application. This may come as a challenge, but translation will be needed from military jargon to layman acceptable generalist terminology. Resumes containing a lot of military terminology will cause HR managers’ eyes to glaze over because they do not understand it. Instead, convert terms for specific applications into broad terms for generic application.

Did you use a proprietary munitions inventory tracking and monitoring system called SCORPINX-57XP? Well, that bullet point should instead read something like, “proficient in inventory and inventory tracking systems.”

3 Match Your Skillset

Pick your battles whenever you can. By applying to jobs you are unqualified for, you are only wasting time and energy. Instead, apply to jobs you stand a good chance at landing because of your experience and skills. For example, you will have a difficult time landing a marketing job with a mechanical background. Instead, search for jobs using keywords, such as “mechanical,” “mechanics,” and “mechanical engineering.”

If you still have your heart set on marketing, find a technical school near your community and enroll. You can pursue an associate degree in fewer than two-years, and schools offering general marketing programs are a dime a dozen.

4 Toot Your Own Horn

As mentioned above, it is important to frame your resume with a civilian reader’s perspective in mind, as that will be necessary to communicate skills, experience, and goals you wish to achieve. However, display your military experience prominently on your resume, as it’s full of golden HR “keywords,” such as:

  • Leadership skills
  • Independent thinking
  • Problem solving
  • Applied teamwork skills
  • Professional dedication

Having served in the armed forces, you are by default highly valuable with critical thinking skills and problem-solving skills. By accompanying your military experience with these skills, you validate your claims, something that many civilian applicants will struggle to do.

5 Triple-Check Fundamentals and Numerically Quantify

As many times as resume consultants warn against it, job applicants consistently include grammatical errors or spelling mistakes on their cover letters and resumes alike. Running a document through spell-check is not sufficient; proofreading requires human eyes. If you don’t have a friend or family member with grammar skills up to the challenge of reviewing your resume, consider contacting an old English teacher.

Finally, throughout your resume, whenever possible, numerically quantify your achievements. For example, if you led a group of soldiers, state how many, written in numerical form as in “100” instead of “one hundred.” Numerals pop out to HR types and make resumes look more qualified.

Also, add ultimate qualifications by including military honors and any medals earned, as this is definitely one area where civilians will not be able to compete with you.

Source: U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

7 Reasons You Should Consider an MBA

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Veteran MBA degree

By Kara Sherrer

Transitioning from the military to civilian life can be challenging, and veterans all approach this life change differently. Some go into military contracting, while others immediately get a job on the civilian side.

Still, others decide to return to school after the military, and getting an MBA can be a great way for veterans to prepare themselves for a new career.

To get the full picture of how an MBA benefits veterans, Vanderbilt University sat down with Christie St-John, Director of Admissions for the MBA program at Vanderbilt Business and the admissions representative for all Armed Forces candidates. She shares the top ways that business school helps veterans.

1  Career Switching Support

Most veterans leave the military with a strong background in operations work. While many veterans can and do get a civilian position working in operations, others want to switch into a different function entirely. An MBA program’s breadth helps veterans ease into a wide variety of industries and makes it easier to start a different career path.

“An MBA gives veterans skills that they can use in many different jobs, and their transition will better, smoother, and financially enhanced with an MBA,” St-John said.

2  Bigger Starting Salaries

Getting an MBA generally results in a higher starting salary for military veterans; for perspective, the average base salary for a Class of 2017 MBA graduate at Vanderbilt Business was $113,205, plus a $25,232 signing bonus. An MBA also improves the probability of future promotions. When asked how she convinces veterans of the value of an MBA, St-John says, “I would probably go to them and say, ‘This will be your starting salary if you start a job right now, and this will be your starting salary if you graduate with an MBA.’ That, and the enhanced network, usually does it.”

3  Larger Professional Network

Going to business school will greatly expand your network beyond current and former military personnel. You’ll connect with professionals across a variety of functions and industries. Through the recruiting process, you’ll also learn how to network with people, a critical skill for navigating the civilian business world. “They don’t have to network in the service. The next promotion is offered if you are qualified, so you don’t have to make sure you socialize with the head of the unit,” St-John explains.

4  Career Resources

Business schools are invested in helping students succeed: after all, it doesn’t help anyone if students drop out or don’t get a job. “[One veteran told me,] ‘In the [military] academies, they’re trying to get you out. Business schools actually want to keep you in,’” St-John recalls, with a laugh. Business schools offer career support services, such as the Career Management Center at Vanderbilt Business, to help all students narrow down possible options, update their resumés, and prepare for interviews.

5  Veterans Clubs

In addition to career management services, many schools offer veteran clubs that give members a place to network with fellow military personnel and get advice on specific recruiting challenges for veterans. For example, “the Armed Forces Club will help [veterans] translate their military resume into a civilian resume,” St-John explains.

6  Financial Aid

Depending on the length and nature of the military officer’s service, several sources of financial support are available. Both the G.I. Bill and the Yellow Ribbon program are possible funding sources for veterans. Outside scholarships, such as those provided by the Pat Tillman Foundation, may also be an option.

7  Many Job Opportunities

Lots of civilian companies are actively looking to hire veterans for their leadership and teamwork experience and their ability to work under pressure. Veterans with MBAs are very desirable candidates for certain industries, including the high-stakes world of investment banking. “Most of the companies we work with have a specific division that is looking for military candidates,” St-John said. “[Companies want veterans] because they know they’re going to be very mature, focused, and disciplined, and they’re obviously excellent at working in teams.”

If you’re a current or former member of the Armed Forces contemplating your next move, reach out to Christie St-John to learn more about the Vanderbilt Business MBA program.

Source: business.vanderbilt.edu