Sharon Caples McDougle is somewhat of a “hidden figure”

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Sharon McDougle with Mae Jamison

Everyone knows that Dr. Mae Jemison was the first African American woman to travel into space – but many don’t know that an African American woman “suited her up”. McDougle was Jemison’s suit tech for the historic mission STS-47 aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavor September 12, 1992.

McDougle worked closely with her during her training leading up to launch, as well as actual launch day and landing of the space shuttle – taking care of all of her assigned crew escape equipment – her suit, helmet, writing utensils, even her diaper.

McDougle joined the NASA family through Boeing Aerospace Operations in 1990 where she worked as a Flight Equipment Processing Contract team member in the Space Shuttle Crew Escape Equipment (CEE) department. She began her career as a CEE Suit Technician and was responsible for processing the orange launch and entry suit (LES) assemblies worn by all NASA space shuttle astronauts. She was assigned to her first mission STS-37 within a year. McDougle was one of only two women CEE Suit Technicians and the only African American technician when she began her career.

In 1994 McDougle was promoted to the position of Crew Chief making her the first female and first African American Crew Chief in CEE. In her new position she was responsible for leading a team of technicians to suit up astronaut crews. She was responsible for leading her team and ensuring the astronaut crews were provided with outstanding support during suited astronaut training, launch, and landing events. In 1998, United Space Alliance (USA) absorbed the Boeing Aerospace Operations contract and McDougle continued in her position as a CEE Crew Chief employed by USA. She traveled to Kennedy Space Center quite often where she worked in support of many space shuttle launches. As Crew Chief McDougle had the honor of leading the first and only all-female suit tech crew supporting space shuttle mission STS-78.

In 2004 McDougle became the first female and first African American promoted to the position of Manager of the CEE Processing department. In this position, she managed the team of 25+ employees responsible for processing the Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES) and related equipment worn by the astronaut crews aboard the space shuttle. Her team assisted the astronaut Sharon McDougle and Lt. Uhuracrews in donning/doffing the suit, testing the equipment, strapping the astronauts into the space shuttle before launch, and recovering the crew upon landing. She held this position until the Space Shuttle Program ended in 2011. Sharon continued working until 2012 to help close-out the program, ending an illustrious 22 year career with the space shuttle program.

Other notable African-American astronauts McDougle has suited up: Charles Bolden, Frederick Gregory, and Dr. Bernard Harris.

During her career she was recognized with the Astronaut “Silver Snoopy” Award, Space Flight Awareness Honoree Award, USA Employee of the Month Teamwork Award, USA Employee of the Month Community Service Award, and the coveted Women of Color in Flight Award from Dr. Mae Jemison recognizing her career as the first and only African American woman suit tech/crew chief in her field. She absolutely loved her job and is proud to have been a part of our nation’s historic Space Shuttle Program.

McDougle was recognized by her home state as a 2018 Mississippi Trailblazer at the 16th Annual Mississippi Trailblazers Awards Ceremony and Black Tie Gala where she received two awards: the Calvin “Buck” Buchanan “FIRST” Award named for Mississippi’s first United States Attorney for the Northern District – honoring a Mississippian who holds the distinction of being the “first” in their profession and the Dr. Cindy Ayers “Legacy” Award honoring a Trailblazer whose singular work and contributions will leave a legacy long after their life has ended.

Most recently, McDougle received the Lifetime Achievement award from the Moss Point Visionary Circle during their 6th Annual Living Legends Ball for her military service and NASA career.

McDougle is also a United States Air Force (USAF) veteran, which is where she began her aerospace career in 1982 after graduating from high school. She served proudly in the Strategic Air Command (SAC) as an Aerospace Physiology Specialist at Beale Air Force Base, CA (1982-1990), reaching the rank of Sergeant (E-4).

During her enlistment she was a member of the Physiological Support Division (PSD). McDougle was responsible for training the SR-71 and U-2/TR-1 (“spy planes”) reconnaissance aircraft pilots on high altitude operations. She performed hazardous duty as an inside observer chamber technician and as a chamber operations team member during hypobaric (altitude) and hyperbaric (dive) chamber operations. During the hypobaric chamber flights crewmembers learned firsthand how hypoxia affects their judgment while flying an aircraft. The crewmembers were taught and practiced how they would handle these types of situations and the importance of wearing all equipment correctly.

McDougle also inspected and maintained flight equipment used for the SR-71 and U-2/TR-1 missions. The equipment included full pressure suit ensembles (helmet, gloves, boots, etc.), harness assemblies, and survival equipment (seat kits and parachutes, and emergency oxygen systems). She sized and fitted crewmembers’ pressure suits, assisted crewmembers in donning and doffing their suits, and performed functional tests before takeoff. She also loaded the survival seat kits and parachutes into the aircraft, strapped-in the crewmembers before take-off, and recovered the crew upon landing.

• 1982 – Graduated from Moss Point High School (Moss Point, MS)
• 1982-1990 – served in the United States Air Force as an Aerospace Physiology Specialist
• 1990 – Joined Boeing Aerospace Operations/Space Shuttle Crew Escape Equipment (CEE), becoming the first African American CEE Suit Technician
• 1992 – Suited up Dr. Mae Jemison, the first woman of color to travel into space (STS-47)
• 1994 – Promoted to Crew Chief, becoming first African American (male or female) CEE Crew Chief
• 1996 – Led the first and only all-female suit tech crew (STS-78)
• 2004 – First and only African American (male or female) promoted to the position of Manager of the CEE department

McDougle spent much of her enlistment on temporary assignment traveling abroad to Greece, Korea, Japan, and England, as well as stateside locations, in support of the SR-71 and U-2/TR-1 reconnaissance aircraft missions. She separated from the Air Force in 1990 with an honorable discharge. During her enlistment she was awarded the Humanitarian Service Medal, Air Force Outstanding Unit Award (2 devices), Good Conduct Medal (1 oak leaf cluster), Training Ribbon, NCO Professional Military Education Ribbon, Longevity Service Award, and was also recognized as Airman of the Month.

Careers for Veterans in the Oil and Gas Industry

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The Oil & Gas industry is a global powerhouse employing hundreds of thousands of workers worldwide as well as generating hundreds of billions of dollars globally each year. While the oil & gas industry is always changing, a career in the industry is steady, since the need for oil is always present across a variety of industries. Oil is not just used in automobiles and airplanes, but in everyday items, such as plastic, cleaning supplies, medical supplies, and even clothing and cosmetics contain oil compounds.

Because of the technical knowledge and intangible skills gained in the military, a career in oil and gas is a natural transition for veterans. “There are a lot of similarities between the military and the oil and gas industry,” explains Steve Casey, Vice President at Orion. “Managers in this industry today are looking for disciplined, hard working, reliable, get-your-hands-dirty, technically capable, and trainable people who want to learn and grow. They’re looking for people who have no problem working in the field and handling tougher environments, and who don’t want to sit inside of an office all day,” he says.

There are many benefits to a career in the oil & gas industry. Compensation is historically higher than most other industries, with entry level Operator positions earning $70,000-$80,000+ in the first year, and Engineers earning well over $100,000. There are also many opportunities for promotion and growth, with the option to move around all over the U.S. and internationally. In addition to compensation, the oil and gas industry allows its employees the opportunity to work with some of the most advanced technology available today. “Many candidates don’t realize how high-tech the oil and gas industry is. Whenever I tour one of the facilities I’m amazed by the technology,” says Casey.

Continue onto Orion Talent to read the complete article.

4 In-Demand Jobs That Value Military Skills

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Soldier using a laptop to job search

Retiring from the military and moving into civilian life is a big step to take. You’re used to living a certain way, taking or giving orders, and performing duties related to your training.

While you may not miss the lifestyle or the commands, you do leave with a skill set ready to be utilized. And you might be surprised to learn that certain industries are looking for experienced employees with the ability to walk onto the “shop floor” and start work with a reasonable amount of training. Transitioning from military to civilian life and earning a living is easier than you think when you consider one of the following industries for employment.

Aircraft Technician

Aviation is an industry in which a wave of retirement is washing up against a major global expansion. The median age of aviation technicians and mechanics in the United States is 51 years old, and not a lot of younger people are stepping up to take their place. The Aviation Technician Education Council’s Pipeline Report predicts that a record number of technicians in the aviation industry will be retiring by 2027. Simultaneously, the airline industry will add an estimated 10,000 planes by 2027, a 40 percent increase in capacity. Although the aviation field won’t be the only one affected by mass retirement, without replacing retiring workers, the industry will find itself hampered in its plans to bring online new planes that are more technologically advanced than ever before.

This is where people with military aviation training can take advantage of the foreseeable shortage of employees — especially women, as the industry is looking to recruit more females, who now make up 2.3% of the certificated mechanic workforce, up from 1.7% in 2001. The shortage means you can write your own ticket just about anywhere in the nation. If you feel you’re not getting anywhere in a specific market, you stand a good chance of finding better employment in another market. All you need is the flexibility to pack up your belongings and find an apartment wherever you decide to go.

Construction Equipment Operator

The construction industry is always in need of qualified people to operate machinery. If you spent time behind the controls of heavy equipment while in the military, you’re almost a shoo-in to become an equipment operator. Controls on civilian machinery are slightly different from military equipment, but experienced operators are able to adapt and get to work quickly. You’ll have to get certifications from the state to operate the equipment, but once you’ve obtained them, you’ll find that employers look at you more favorably as a hire. Construction company operators want people who will show up on time, do a good job, understand their role, and understand what they have to do with a minimum of instruction.

This is another industry where you can find employment anywhere in the country, even in climates where inclement weather can put a halt to outdoor work: Indoor construction can sometimes involve the use of small machines, which also require certification. Also, keep in mind that construction work is almost always union-based, and you can take advantage of the benefits that come with membership. Make connections at the hall, keep your ear to the ground, and pay attention to the job boards for work opportunities.

Disaster Planning and Preparation

All communities and governments must anticipate disasters and have emergency plans ready, so disaster preparation is standard training in all military branches. Many service members could probably execute a disaster plan in their sleep because it was drilled into their heads during their service. However, the civilian sector has nowhere near the experience it needs to plan for a disaster. Your military experience in this field will be welcomed by the civilian sector as it faces threats from a world changing faster than it can keep up with. And you can increase your value as a consultant or employee by getting first aid certifications from FEMA, Red Cross, or other organizations that respond during an emergency situation.

Weather-related disasters are one of the biggest threats that private businesses face. Changes in weather patterns are bringing more adverse weather events than ever before, and businesses are ill-equipped to deal with floods and high winds that destroy buildings. Demand is on the rise for people who can create disaster plans for businesses and show them how to prepare.

Emergency Medical Services

Responding to medical emergencies requires the ability to stay cool, calm, and collected while working to save someone’s life or stabilize injuries during transportation to an ER. Working in the emergency medical service field is a great fit for someone who’s had experience in a medical role while serving. Your military experience is regarded as a bonus by employers because you’re trained to handle a variety of stressful factors without losing focus while taking care of a patient.

All the aspects of the civilian job are the same as in the military, and so are the requirements. You will need to continue renewing your first aid certifications every two years, but the tests are the same as in the service.

The civilian world is full of jobs that value retired members of the military as employees. You’ll find that your experience goes a long way toward opening doors to employment and securing you an excellent quality of life.

Author
Brad Miller
TheMilitaryGuide.org

How to Ace the Career Fair

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Man holding a Job Fair sign

By Susan Ricker

Advance your job search with a wide variety of employers and organizations that can be found at career fairs—and learn how to do your military service justice.

A career fair is a great opportunity to interact with employers, share your experience and possibly secure a follow-up job interview or even an offer. With five to 10 minutes of an interviewer’s time, you can learn about their opportunities and talk yourself up, and discern if their organization might be right for you to join.

With all the perks that come along with career fairs, it can be easy to view this as the answer to your job search. But for job fair attendees – and military veterans in particular – it will greatly improve your chances of finding the right job match if you take careful steps to prepare. Along with dressing sharply and being punctual, here are the steps to take to make sure you can ace the career fair.

Go in with a plan. Career fairs are an efficient way to pack progress into your job search, since plenty of employers are assembled specifically to meet job seekers and identify prospective talent. But if you plan to make the rounds once you’re there and see who you’re interested in, you may be wasting your time.

Not every employer will be a good fit for your experience or career goals, so check the career fair’s website ahead of time to identify who will be in attendance and who’s company goals and positions are the best match for you. Create a list of who you want to make sure you meet, and take the time to research the company and customize your job application materials. You’ll be able to speak intelligently to their reps, as well as offer tailored information about yourself. Prepare for this by reading through their website, browsing past press releases or checking them out on social media.

Make your resume readable for civilians. A strong resume sums up your past experience and skills, then applies them to your prospective employer’s needs to demonstrate that you’re the best person for the job. For veterans, your service experience can be just as applicable to the position as a civilians, but you need to make sure that a non-military employer can understand how.

Translate your skills and experience into more business-friendly language, like your leadership skills, project management or experience in high-stress situations. The biggest challenge employers face in hiring veterans is understanding how their experience applies to the open position, so take out the guesswork for them and make it clear how you’ll benefit the organization.

Point out veteran advantages. While you were serving in the military, you picked up a number of skills and training, as well as some characteristics that allowed you to work well on a team and act as a strong leader and service member. Even though you’re no longer on active duty, those traits can still serve you and others well – and it helps to point this out to employers. A CareerBuilder survey shared the top qualities and soft skills that employers know to expect from employees with military experience, including:

  • Disciplined approach to work—63 percent
  • Ability to work as a team—60 percent
  • Respect and integrity—56 percent
  • Ability to perform under pressure—51 percent
  • Leadership skills—51 percent
  • Problem-solving skills—47 percent
  • Ability to adapt quickly—45 percent
  • Attitude of perseverance—41 percent
  • Communication skills—40 percent
  • Strong technical skills—31 percent

There are also a number of other advantages veterans have in the job market. For one, former military members have federal security clearance, which is not only required for many government jobs, but also for jobs at government-contracted companies that work on classified or defense-related projects. Because it can cost companies a lot of time and money to get security clearance for civilian employees, veterans are usually preferred for these types of positions.

End on a high note. When your time with the recruiter is coming to a close, express your interest in learning more about the position and company, and ask for the opportunity to come in for a longer interview. Also be sure to get their business card or information for connecting on social media, and follow up within 48 hours with a thank-you note for their time and reiterate your interest.

The career fair will go by quickly if you’ve done your prep work and come ready to talk about your experience and ideas. And for military veterans who prepare in advance and understand their best qualities to share, a career fair can be one of the best opportunities for connecting with the right employer.

Source:  CareerBuilder

6 Tips for a Killer Resume

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Transitioning Veteran

Whether you’re new to the workforce or are looking to make a change, one of the best things you can do for your career is craft a stellar resume. Even if writing isn’t your strong suit, you can still put together a solid resume to entice prospective employers. Here’s how to do it.

1. Craft a compelling opening summary

The opening section of your resume sets the tone for the rest of that document — so it’s important to get it right. Your introductory statement should give a brief, snappy overview of who you are and why you’re such a valuable asset, so use it to draw in your audience and convince those hiring managers to keep reading. Do not, however, mistake your introduction for an objective. “Seeking a role where I can prosper and grow” doesn’t speak to your talents or personality. “Fearless marketer with boundary-pushing tendencies,” on the other hand, is a far more captivating way to start.

2. List your responsibilities and achievements from most to least significant

The folks who receive your resume may not always read it in its entirety. In fact, there’s a good chance they’ll merely skim through it at first, and then go back for a more thorough read once interested. That’s why it’s critical to put your most valuable skills and accomplishments toward the top of each section, where readers’ eyes are most likely to land initially, and stick those mundane, less impressive tasks lower down on the list. Even if you spent most of your time at your last job booking conference rooms and making travel arrangements for other people, if you were given several key projects to run with, highlight those first.

3. Use hard numbers

It’s one thing to boast of your sales prowess, but it’s another to document the extent to which you’ve actually delivered results. That’s why it pays to use hard numbers to highlight your achievements whenever possible. If you increased sales by 20% at your last job, say so — with a number.

4. Don’t list skills that should be a given

Pretty much everyone who works in an office also knows how to use the internet. The same holds true for basic word processing and spreadsheets. Calling out these skills on your resume could be a sign that you’re desperate for content — which might turn prospective employers away. Instead, focus on the skills that make you stand out, and avoid stating what should be the obvious.

5. Show, don’t just tell

It’s hard to pin down your entire career to a one-page snapshot, but thankfully, you don’t have to. If you’ve developed an online portfolio showcasing your work, include a link to it on your resume so that prospective employers know where to look for further detail. It’s one thing to talk about what a wonderful graphic designer you are, but it’s much more powerful to let those hiring managers see for themselves.

6. Keep it clean

In the hiring world, there’s no greater turnoff than a resume laden with errors. Similarly, if your fonts and italics usage are all over the place on the document, your potential employer is bound to notice that sloppiness. Before you submit your resume, examine it thoroughly for stylistic consistency. This means that if you bold the name of a previous employer in one section, you should do the same in another. And though the following should go without saying, for the love of grammar, run your resume through a spell-checking program to ensure that the words it contains are, well, actual words.

Finally, make certain your contact information is both up-to-date and professional. “Beerdrinker52@wazoomail.com” may be a perfectly fine email address to share with your friends, but for resume purposes, you’re much better off with the classic “first name_last name” format.

Though we’re told not to judge books by their covers, there’s no question that those reading your resume will use it to determine whether or not you’re worth pursuing as a job candidate. The more work you put into that document, the more likely it is to help get you hired.

Continue on to The Motley Fool to read the complete article.

Caponera Earns Military Excellence Award at Recruit Training Command

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CAPONERA.MEA

GREAT LAKES (NNS)—Seaman Recruit Martine Caponera, Division 405, graduated as the top Sailor from Recruit Training Command, earning the Military Excellence Award on Oct. 12.

Caponera, from Fountain Valley, California, was inspired to join the Navy after volunteering with Compass 31, an organization based in Chiang Mai, Thailand, that works to bring females out of human trafficking. “I joined the Navy to be a part of the greater cause in helping those in need,” Caponera said. “I witnessed so much pain and suffering, and the Navy provides me the opportunity to finish nursing school and go forth and help those people as well as others all around the world.”

Caponera, 22, is a 2014 graduate of Fountain Valley High School in Fountain Valley, California. She was employed as a restaurant manager in Newport Beach, California. Caponera is assigned the rate of Fire Controlman.

The Navy Club of the United States Military Excellence Award is the top award presented to the No. 1 recruit of their graduating training group. The MEA is awarded to the recruit that best exemplifies the qualities of enthusiasm, devotion to duty, military bearing and teamwork. The award placed her at the pinnacle of today’s newest Sailors. Caponera is awarded a flag letter of commendation.

Caponera said her selection as the MEA was humbling.

“There are so many brilliant, talented Sailors, not only in my division, but throughout all the training groups that I am proud to serve with,” she said. “Coming in the first day of boot camp, I had very little knowledge of the military or the customs of the military, so winning this award shows me how far I have come and how much my hard work has paid off.”

Caponera credited her Recruit Division Commanders, Chief Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) Robert Zahrn, Chief Aviation Machinist’s Mate Adam Gonzales, and Air Traffic Controller 1st Class Heather Townsend for their leadership and guidance.

“My RDCs have portrayed such incredible examples of how a Sailor should conduct themselves, always showing examples of honor, courage, and commitment,” she said. “(Chief) Gonzales’ dedication to what he does has shown me that I can do anything. His pride in being a part of this incredible organization motivates me every day and the training tools he has provided me will continue to help me succeed in the fleet.”

Caponera also said her mother has been a constant source of inspiration.

“My main sources of motivation here at boot camp were my RDCs and my mom,” she said. “As I have changed my majors and my mind over the years, my mom has been steadfast by my side, always encouraging me to do what I am passionate about. I would not be where I am today without her support.”

Caponera said the transition from civilian to basically-trained Sailor was her biggest challenge at boot camp.

“It was the culture shock of never being around the military sector before, then fully immersing myself in it through boot camp,” she said. “I pushed myself out of my comfort zone and studying every night until I was completely confident in my knowledge and ability to navigate military life.”

After graduation, Caponera will attend “A” School at Great Lakes. Fire Controlman provide system employment recommendations; perform organizational and intermediate maintenance on digital computer equipment, subsystems, and systems; operate and maintain combat and weapons direction systems, surface to air and surface to surface missile systems, and gun fire control systems at the organizational and intermediate level.

Boot camp is approximately eight weeks and all enlistees into the U.S. Navy begin their careers at the command. Training includes physical fitness, seamanship, firearms, firefighting and shipboard damage control along with lessons in Navy heritage and core values, teamwork and discipline. More than 30,0000 recruits graduate annually from RTC and begin their Navy careers.

For more news from Recruit Training Command, visit navy.mil/local/rtc/.

These are the fastest-growing jobs in the next 5 years

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Job Transition for veterans

Being a home health aide is predicted to be the fastest-growing job from 2018 to 2023, according to a new report from CareerBuilder. The CareerBuilder data was calculated based on info from Emsi, a national leader in medical information services, and focuses on 774 occupations that are classified by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The biggest jumps are for home health aides, software developers, and medical assistants. Registered nurses, the occupation on the list with the most expected jobs added, are expected to see an 8.39% jump in job openings by 2023.

“What we see across industries … is that most professionals are becoming tech workers in some capacity,” Irina Novoselsky, CEO of CareerBuilder, told Yahoo Finance in an email.

With technology continuing to evolve, skills that employees will need are being redefined as well. Novoselsky noted that most of the fastest-growing occupations include some kind of technological component. Earlier this year, tech jobs took the top two spots as the “Best Jobs in America,” largely due to the high demand for the position.

“As we have seen historically, technology and healthcare positions continue to dominate the fastest-growing occupations,” she said. “Technology is an integral part of business and everyday life. Advancements in medicine are enabling people to live longer.

The occupations were sorted into three categories: high-wage jobs, middle-wage jobs, and low-wage jobs. Low-wage jobs were defined as those that pay $14.17 or less an hour, middle-wage jobs as $14.18-$23.59 per hour, and high-wage jobs as $23.24 per hour.

Fatest Growing Jobs

Jobs on the rise in the high-wage category include postsecondary teachers, accountants and auditors, and computer user support specialists. Among middle-wage occupations, customer service representatives, construction laborers, and general maintenance and repair workers are seeing the biggest jump. In the low-wage category are occupations such as retail salespersons, security guards, and restaurant cooks.

Continue on to Yahoonews.com to read the complete article.

Sailor Spotlight! Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jerry Jimenez

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JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – A 2018 La Habra High School graduate and La Habra, California, native is serving in the U.S. Navy aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville, home to the U.S. Navy’s newest maritime, patrol and reconnaissance aircraft. Petty Officer 3rd Class Christopher Ramirez is a Navy yeoman serving with Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 (CPRW-11). A Navy yeoman is responsible for performing various administrative and clerical duties. “I like that I get to meet everyone in the command,” said Ramirez. “I’m in customer service so I get a chance to meet everyone.”

Ramirez credits success in the Navy to many of the lessons learned in La Habra.

“I learned to always have a good, positive attitude,” said Ramirez.

The P-8A Poseidon is a multi-mission aircraft that is replacing the legacy P-3C Orion. Those who fly in the P-8A hunt for submarines and surface ships as well as conduct intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance missions.

The P-8A operates with a smaller crew than the P-3C, and it also delivers an extended global reach, greater payload capacity, and higher operating altitude. It also has an open-systems architecture with significant growth potential.

According to Navy officials, there are more than 15 Navy patrol squadrons in the U.S. and eight of those squadrons belong to Wing Eleven, headquartered in Jacksonville, Florida. This means that those who serve here are part of the first “Super Wing” in Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance history, ready to deploy and defend America and allies around the world.

Wing Eleven recently added the Navy’s newest squadron to its arsenal: Unmanned Patrol Squadron Nineteen (VP-19), flying the MQ-4C Triton Unmanned Aerial System (UAS). The P-8A and MQ-4C will serve as the future of the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force, according to Navy officials.

When asked about his plans following his assumption of command ceremony in June, Capt. Craig T. Mattingly, Commodore, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 said, “Our focus will be to take care of our most precious assets, the men and women of (Wing Eleven). We will sustain current readiness of our P-8A squadrons and reserve P-3C squadron while incorporating the MQ-4C Triton into the maritime patrol and reconnaissance force.”

Though there are many ways for sailors to earn distinction in their command, community, and career, Ramirez is most proud of earning a promotion to petty officer.

“I was really nervous taking the exam and when I passed it was a great relief coming off my shoulders,” Ramirez said.

As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied upon assets, Ramirez and other sailors know they are part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes, one that will provide a critical component of the Navy the nation needs.

“It means having a great responsibility and being more independent and responsible,” said Ramirez.

Source: outreach.navy.mil

5 Questions Hiring Managers Think During Interviews (But Might Not Ask)

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interview sign on door

Interviews are fairly anxiety inducing, especially when your interviewer has what can only be described as a professional poker face.

You could drive yourself insane trying to figure out what exactly is going on behind that diplomatic smile.

To save you from the agony and to help you better prepare, here is an insider look at what goes through a hiring manager’s mind during an interview. In general, employers are looking for the best technical and cultural fit that their budgets will allow for. While these questions will all go through their minds, the questions they end up asking usually aren’t as direct. So, know that no matter how wacky or irrelevant the question might seem, they all come back to these five core concerns.

1. Have You Successfully Done Similar Work in the Past?

Really, the question should be more along the lines of, “Can you do the job?” but that’s not always the easiest thing to evaluate. That’s why such weight is given to your ability to show relevant work that you have done, whether it was for another company, for school, or just independently.

Any chance you get, you should be talking about your relevant experience and transferable skills. Of course, it’s not always just about results. Being able to talk about why you were successful is also important. Tell stories about your previous experience (here’s how, and be introspective. The interviewer will be attempting to draw insights from your answers, so you might as well spell them out to make sure you’re sending the message you want to send.

2. Will You Work Well With My Current Team?

There is always some context that you’re being hired into, and it’s in the hiring manager’s best interest to make sure you will be a good fit and can hit the ground running.

How exactly can a hiring manager discern whether or not you’ll work out? In the end, it’s still a bit of a gamble, but a few things you should definitely try to get across are your communication style and effectiveness, your work ethic, your career values, and how you approach problems. Think broadly about these things, and then come up with a concrete supporting example as you’re preparing for the interview.

And remember: There’s no right or wrong answer here. After all, you don’t want to end up in a situation where you’re a bad fit either.

3. What Do You Know About My Company?

You’re applying for a specific role that probably exists in many other companies as well, so why this one? Hiring managers want you to show not only that you know what makes their particular company special, but that you’re really excited about it. Doing your homework on the company and considering why you’d be a good fit shows that you’re invested.

Naturally, it doesn’t stop there. Asking thoughtful and informed questions about the company is a great way to show continued enthusiasm as the interview progresses (here are a few great ones). Do the company research beforehand, and show off what you know in both your answers and your questions.

4. Does the Job You’re Expecting Align With What the Job Actually Is?

In other words, do you know what you’re signing up for, and is it what you’re really looking for? No one wants to hire someone who just wants the job to tide him or her over until a new, more desirable job turns up. And, while we’re on the topic of expectations, are your salary expectations in line with the company’s? To get to the point, can the company afford to hire you?

To get to this, the interviewer might ask anything from your motivation for leaving your previous position to what you’re most excited about in the new role. The current salary question will likely come up at some point as well. In the end, there are a hundred different questions that could get at this concern. To prepare in a realistic amount of time, figure out what your career narrative is. Where did you come from, where are you going, and why? How does this job fit in with your goals? Oh, and read up on negotiation.

5. Are You Confident in Your Abilities?

This might not be something hiring managers are thinking about consciously, but you can bet that their perception of your confidence will make a difference in how they remember you. Now, confidence can mean different things to different people, but in general if you can show that you’re passionate about the work and you look the part, half the battle is won. If you want to boost your confidence even more, set some time aside to do a few power poses before the big interview.

Of course, looking confident is just a matter of practice, but being confident requires a whole new mindset. If you’re short on time, get a pep talk from your support network of friends and mentors. Having the right people in your life can make a world of difference when it comes to self-confidence—not to mention it’s easier (and more effective) to say, “My manager would describe me as hardworking,” rather than “I’d say I’m a pretty hard worker.”

Author-Lily Zhang
Continue on to The Muse to read the complete article.

DraftKings’ High-Tech Jobs Skills Training Program Now Open for Texas Veterans

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BOSTON, MA–DraftKings Inc. recently announced that it is expanding its Tech for Heroes initiative to Austin, Texas. The eight-week course, beginning October 9 and offered free of charge, is designed to provide high-tech job skills training to current and returning veterans and military spouses, so they can expand their knowledge base and find gainful employment in the tech sector.

“The Tech for Heroes program was designed with one goal in mind–help veterans gain a real advantage in an extremely competitive tech industry,” said Paul Liberman, co-founder and COO of DraftKings. “The skills acquired through the program can be applied to nearly any company, no matter their size or industry, giving each individual the ability to explore career paths of all types. These individuals have all made tremendous sacrifices in service to our country and this program is one way we are showing our collective appreciation.”

Working in partnership with the national nonprofit VetsinTech, DraftKings launched the company’s first corporate social responsibility initiative in June with its inaugural Tech for Heroes training class taking place in Boston. Last month, the company announced an expansion of the program to San Francisco, California, where it is training more than 30 veterans and military spouses in web development.

“We are excited to continue the expansion of the Tech for Heroes program to Austin. The partnership with DraftKings has allowed us to impact so many veterans and their families all across the country, and we look forward to the opportunity to bring this life changing training to Texas,” said Katherine Webster, founder and CEO of VetsinTech.

DraftKings’ employees will be working with the veterans to grow their understanding of employment opportunities at high-tech companies and to further support the veteran graduates pursuing careers in tech. Efforts include resume development, career roadmapping and skills translation as well as peer to peer networking.

The deadline for signing-up is October 8.

For additional information on the DraftKings Tech For Heroes program and to inquire about joining a class, please visit Tech for Heroes.

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About DraftKings

DraftKings is a global sports technology and entertainment company that believes life is more fun with skin in the game. Its mission is to bring fans closer to the games they love via a unique combination of daily fantasy sports, sports betting and media platforms that, combined, deliver “The Game Inside The Game.” Founded in 2012 by Matt Kalish, Paul Liberman and Jason Robins, DraftKings is headquartered in Boston, MA, and offers daily fantasy sports contests across 11 professional sports in 8 countries including the U.S., Canada, U.K and Australia. Now a licensed operator in New Jersey, DraftKings Sportsbook allows players in the state to engage in betting for major U.S. and international sports.

About VetsinTech

VetsinTech supports current and returning veterans with re-integration services, and by connecting them to the national technology ecosystem. VIT is committed to bringing together a tech-specific network, resources, and programs for our veterans interested in education, entrepreneurship, and employment.

National Veterans Memorial and Museum to Open October 27

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NVMMC

There are more than 20 million living veterans throughout the United States, from our Greatest Generation to our recent heroes coming home from Afghanistan and Iraq. And yet, there is no single monument or museum dedicated to the Veteran’s experience.

There are institutions that focus on specific conflicts or branches of service, but there hasn’t been a place for us all to join together to celebrate and honor the sacrifice of all of our veterans, past and present…until now.

The National Veterans Memorial and Museum (NVMM), officially designated by the Federal Government, will officially open on Saturday, October 27, 2018 from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. The NVMM will host a dedication and grand opening ceremony that will feature distinguished veterans whose stories are highlighted in the museum, military leadership and appearances or performances by men and women of the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard and Reserves. General Colin Powell (U.S. Army, Retired) will deliver the keynote address. The public is encouraged to attend the dedication to celebrate the opening of this historic institution.

The museum, located at 300 W. Broad Street, Columbus, OH 43215, will open immediately after the dedication and will remain open until 9 p.m. that evening to allow as many guests as possible to experience the exhibits.

Please RSVP for the Dedication and Grand Opening Ceremonies at nationalvmm.org/grandopening/.