La Fleet Week 2018 Navy Film Festival To Celebrate 100 Years Of Navy In Hollywood

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Fleet Week 2018

SAN PEDRO, Calif. – Featuring black-and-white to modern-era films, LA Fleet Week® 2018 presented by Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan on Amazon Prime Video will include a Labor Day Weekend Navy Film Festival at the iconic Warner Grand Theatre in downtown San Pedro. 

The Festival will celebrate the century-long relationship between the US Navy and the world-renowned film industry that has brought military life, storylines and battle realities to the big screen since 1918.

“This Festival marks a milestone for the US Navy and Hollywood, highlighting the ways that movies have—and will continue to—shape what we think about the military, as well as the men and women who serve,” said US Navy retired Rear Admiral Mike Shatynski, co-founder and board member of the LA Fleet Week Foundation. “As a kid growing up in LA, military-themed movies definitely were something that influenced my decision to serve my country and see the world.”

The festival will also commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Fleet Combat Camera units, groups of service personnel assigned to filming and documenting the history and activities of the US Navy and other branches.  Since World War II, Combat Camera footage has been featured in Hollywood movies and Navy documentaries, and used for military training and educational purposes. The Festival will honor the Navy’s Combat Camera unit, which is slated to be decommissioned this year.

The film festival will screen six different classic films from Sept. 1-3 at the historic Warner Grand Theatre in San Pedro, with each night featuring a different theme. The first film each night will be shown at 5:00 p.m. and the second at 8:15 p.m. The first episode of the new series “Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan” will be shown between each feature film, compliments of Amazon Prime Video.

FILM FESTIVAL SCHEDULE
·        Saturday, Sept. 1 – Marine Corps Night
o   “Sands of Iwo Jima” – John Wayne WWII classic, 1949
o   Battle: Los Angeles” – Marine Corps versus aliens in Los Angeles, 2011

·        Sunday, Sept. 2 – Navy Air Night
o   “Hell Divers” – Classic fighter pilot film starring Clark Gable and Wallace Beery, filmed aboard first aircraft carriers, 1931
o   “Top Gun” – Modern-day fighter pilot classic starring Tom Cruise, filmed aboard carriers with full Navy cooperation, 1986

·        Monday, Sept. 3 – Navy Ships & Subs
o   “Mister Roberts” – Classic comedy starring Henry Fonda, Jack Lemmon and James Cagney about a Navy cargo ship serving in the South Pacific in the waning days of WWII, 1955
o   “Hunt for Red October” – American espionage thriller adapted from the Tom Clancy best-selling novel, 1990

Ticket sales start each day at 4:00 p.m., with doors opening at 4:30 p.m.  Admission is free for all active military, veterans and children under three years, and $5.00 (cash only) for all others. For theater location, details and most up-to-date information, visit lafleetweek.com.

Since its first venture into Hollywood more than a century ago, the US Navy has been recognized with three Academy awards for films it has produced, including Best Documentary Feature (“The Battle of Midway”) and Best Documentary Short Subject (“December 7th”) in 1943, and Best Documentary Feature (“The Fighting Lady”) in 1945.

About LA Fleet Week® 2018 presented by “Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan” on Amazon Prime Video
LA Fleet Week is an annual, multi-day celebration of our nation’s Sea Services held on the LA Waterfront at the Port of Los Angeles.  Free to the public, the Labor Day Weekend event features public ship tours, military displays, equipment demonstrations, live entertainment, a kids’ STEM Expo, aerial demonstrations, the LA Fleet Week® 2018 Navy Film Festival, the 10th Annual Conquer the Bridge Labor Day morning 5.3-mile walk/run over the Vincent Thomas Bridge, the LA Fleet Week 5 on 5 Basketball Tournament, and a Galley Wars presented by Princess Cruises culinary cook-off competition between Sailor, Marine, Coast Guard and Royal Canadian Navy teams.

LA Fleet Week is organized by the LA Fleet Week Foundation, in partnership with the Port of Los Angeles and City of Los Angeles.  Other LA Fleet Week 2018 sponsors include Amazon Prime Video, the Annenberg Foundation, Outfront Media, Delta Air Lines, Bob Hope USO, American Legion Post, Battleship IOWA, Princess Cruises, Andeavor, Clyde & Co., Providence Little Company of Mary, Sam’s Club and South Coast Plaza.

For more information, visit lafleetweek.org

Pro Soccer Player Becomes Army Officer

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1st Lt. Anthony Uriarte playing ball

By Sgt. Ian Ives

What would you give to serve your country? Would you turn down an opportunity to play a professional sport? Though soccer has always been a large part 1st Lt. Anthony Uriarte’s life, he declined multiple professional soccer contracts to follow his calling of being an officer in the United States Army.

Now a medical service officer with the 25th Sustainment Brigade, the 26-year-old Uriarte has led an interesting life due to his talent on the soccer field.

At the age of 15, Uriarte was selected to play on a team that would represent the United States on a tour of England and played many prestigious teams during the trip. Several years later, he found himself in college. “I was taking a physical education course and I remember this girl walking in, in an Army Combat Uniform one day, and I was like ‘What,'” said Uriarte. “At the time I didn’t know anything about the military, but I found it so interesting that you could be a student and be in the Army. She always came in on time, and acted very professional. I admired her for that.”

Recalling the female in ACU’s during his physical education class, Uriarte decided to research what the Reserve Officer Training Corps was. After looking at his options, Uriarte applied and was accepted into The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina.

After graduating in 2015 with a bachelor’s in political science with an emphasis on pre-law, Uriarte had to choose which branch of the Army he was going to commission into.

“One of my big things is figuring out what I can do to help other people,” said Uriarte. “So when I found out that I could commission as a medical service officer, I thought ‘That’s perfect.'”

After being commissioned and doing a year of gold-bar recruiting, Uriarte was stationed at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii with the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division in 2016. While with the ‘Bronco’ brigade, he played on an Armed Forces Soccer team where a fellow player, who had played in All-Army Soccer before, suggested he try out for the team.

After being selected for the All-Army soccer team, Uriarte and his fellow players traveled to Fort 1st Lt. Anthony Uriarte playing ballBenning, Ga. to compete in the Armed Forces soccer tournament against the other branches of the military.

With 2017 came a new assignment in the form of an inter-post transfer to the 25th Sustainment Brigade and another year of All-Army Soccer. Tryouts were also different for Uriarte due to his selection the year prior, giving him an almost guaranteed position on the team.

“No matter what you tell yourself, no matter how much you prepare, when the referee blows that whistle… you’ll think to yourself, ‘Oh crap this is really happening!'” laughed Uriarte.

Since returning from the All-Army Team this year, Uriarte has begun coaching soccer for Hawaii Rush Youth Soccer for boys around the age of 15 years old. Coaching is something that Uriarte says he is becoming increasingly passionate about. He has even spoke with officials from Moanalua High School, Honolulu about becoming a coach for their soccer team.

“As unfortunate as it sounds we all have to get older,” said Uriarte. “Hopefully when my playing days over I will be able to step into a coaching position for All-Army. Even if I am not on the field playing, I can continue contributing in some way.”

Source: army.mil

Wes Studi: ‘A True Warrior’

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Wes Studi-Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

By Brady Rhoades

Actor Wes Studi, who delivered a historic and stirring tribute to veterans at the 2018 Oscars, saw a generation of veterans return from Vietnam only to be cast aside by many of their countrymen and women.

He never wants to see that again.

That’s why the Vietnam veteran, who starred in Dances with Wolves, The Last of the Mohicans, and Hostiles visits military bases and attends Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA) conventions.

“It’s almost intimidating because I don’t know exactly how it is for them,” he said. “I know what it was like for us… It was drummed into us to take care of yourself and take care of your buddies.”

And it’s why he urges citizens to support veterans.

“I think the thing you can do is be active politically and fix up the VA,” he said.

Back in March, Studi became the first Native American presenter at the Oscars.

“As a veteran, I am always appreciative when filmmakers bring to the screen stories of those who have served,” Studi said on stage. “Over 90 years of the Academy Awards, a number of movies with military themes have been honored at the Oscars. Let’s take a moment to pay tribute to these powerful films that shine a great spotlight on those who have fought for freedom around the world.”

Photo: BEVERLY HILLS, CA – Chief Phillip Whiteman Jr., Lynette Two Bulls, Byron Allen, Christian Bale, Carolyn Folks, Scott Cooper, Q’Orianka Kilchar, Rory Cochran and Wes Studi attends the premiere of “Hostiles” (Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

Audience members and viewers saw clips from famous films.

The 90th annual Academy Awards were memorable for many reasons, but the most talked-about moment might have been when Studi, who is Cherokee, concluded his address in Cherokee.

Veterans appreciated it. Native Americans appreciated it. Veterans who are Native Americans really appreciated it.

“Both groups hadn’t gotten much mention at the Oscars,” said Studi, 70. “Some people feel like they’ve been forgotten, left out of the process.”

Studi was inundated with emails and letters. Social media erupted. One woman on Twitter said, “A proud moment and true role model for our youth … a true warrior.”

Wes Studi was born in a Cherokee family in Nofire Hollow, Oklahoma, a rural area in eastern Oklahoma, where Cherokees have lived since the Trail of Tears. He is the son a housekeeper and a ranch hand. Until he attended elementary school, he spoke only Cherokee. He attended Chilocco Indian Agricultural School for high school and graduated in 1964; his vocational major was in dry cleaning.

At 17, Studi enlisted in the Oklahoma National Guard and worked through Basic Combat Training and Advanced Individual Training at Ft. Polk, Louisiana.

Studi volunteered for active service and went to Vietnam with A Company of the 3rd Battalion 39th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. He served 12 months in Vietnam.

Those 12 months changed his life.

“I discovered what being in combat is,” he said. “What sticks out most is you’re with your buddies and you’re going to take care of each other.”

He remembers the terror and violence of war, but also the natural beauty of Vietnam and the joys of friendship.

“There’s a resilient spirit in human nature,” he said. “You’re going to enjoy yourself no matter the situation.”

He also recalls that the U.S. military could not have cared less about his—or anyone else’s—ethnicity. He was a soldier.

“I was treated well,” he said. “The fact that I was Cherokee didn’t have anything to do with anything.”

Photo: ORLANDO, FL Wes Studi, Joel David Moore, Sam Worthington, Stephen Lang, James Cameron, Zoe Saldana, C. C. H. Pounder, Sigourney Weaver and Laz Alonso attends the Pandora The World Of Avatar Dedication (Photo by Gustavo Caballero/Getty Images)

After his discharge, he became an activist for Native American causes and tried making a living in many ways, including bull riding. In hindsight, he realizes that the war had awakened in him the need to confront fear and to feel the rush of adrenaline that comes with conquering your fears.

A friend convinced him to get involved in community theater. It didn’t take much coaxing. Theater was a good place to meet women, his friend told him. It turned out to offer even more than that.

“What I saw in community theater was you could learn your lines and do rehearsals and all of that, but finally opening night shows up and you’re in the wings and I rediscovered that huge wall of fear,” he said. “And to me, that provided excitement.”

It took him years of toil and sweat, but he broke into Hollywood with a role in The Trial of Standing Bear in 1988. His acting career had lifted from the launch-pad. His star burst brightly in the 1990s; movie-goers came to know him as a proud and fierce warrior in Dances and Mohicans.

Thirty years after making his screen debut, Studi was standing in front of 50 million-plus viewers, worldwide, at the Oscars.

He was coming off the 2017 release of Hostiles, in which he plays Chief Yellow Hawk, an aging, ailing Cheyenne warrior who—sometime in the 1890s—is escorted back to his tribal home in Montana by Capt. Joseph Blocker, played by actor Christian Bale.

Michael Ordona of Common Sense Media reviewed the movie and was impressed by one unexpected aspect of it.

“The most original thing about Hostiles is its rare depiction of PTSD in the Old West,” Ordona wrote. “Here, Bale and his lieutenant (Rory Cochrane) play soldiers who’ve been at it too long, seen too much, and done too many things they can’t really justify. When one confesses he’s got ‘the melancholia,’ it’s dismissed out of hand—just as the idea that war and a life of violence can cause injuries that can’t be seen wasn’t widely accepted until fairly recently. As Blocker, Yellow Hawk (Wes Studi) and Rosalie share dangers and develop trust, the film’s theme of how a traumatic existence can change people—and yet the good in them might still prevail—becomes clear.”

According to the Wounded Warrior Project, about 400,000 veterans of battles in Afghanistan and Iraq live with the invisible wounds of war, including combat stress, Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), depression and PTSD. The United States Department of Veterans Affairs has conducted studies that show there are 22 veteran suicides a day, or about 8,000 a year.

We’ve come a long way since the Old West. But we’ve got a long way to go, Studi said. “We’ve got to find assistance for people with PTSD and other conditions,” he said.

He added that we’ve got to do more than thank veterans for their service (although that’s always appreciated). Veterans, especially those who’ve been wounded and traumatized, need above all hope, and hope is realized when they see marked improvements in their lives.

“It’s pretty simple,” he said. “Support anything that has to do with the betterment of veterans.”

 

LEGOLAND California Offers free military admission in August

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Legoland entrance

ACTIVE U.S. MILITARY PLAYS FREE IN AUGUST! As a “THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE!” LEGOLAND® California Resort is inviting all active U.S. Military personnel to receive FREE unlimited admission to LEGOLAND®, SEA LIFE Aquarium and LEGOLAND Water Park!

LEGO® City: Deep Sea Adventure ride has a new fleet of submarines and the resort invites you to ride the 22,000 pound sea vessels. To redeem, visit any LEGOLAND California Resort ticket booth or guest service window to show your active duty U.S. Military ID and receive one same day, 1-Day Resort Hopper ticket.

Feel free to visit as many times as you’d like in the month of August!

3  Easy Ways to Buy U.S. Military Friends & Family Tickets:

All non-acitve U.S. Military, plus friends & family can purchase 3-Day LEGOLAND Resort Hoppers for less than $29 per day!

  • Visit your Military Ticket Office located on Military bases – Best Rate!
  • Purchase online at LEGOLAND.com/Military – Save up to 50%
  • Go to a LEGOLAND California ticket booth – Save up to 10%

Visit Legoland.com/california for all the details.

U.S. Army Soldier on Mission to Bring Dog Back with Him from Middle East

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New York, NY –While U.S. Army missions may be the stuff of top secret details, there is no hiding what is going on with the mission that one solder is on. Protecting his identity so that his security is not compromised, David is a U.S. Army soldier stationed in the Middle East who is on a mission to save a dog he befriended while being deployed.

Not wanting to leave the dog behind after he leaves the Middle East, he reached out to Paws of War to see if they can help bring Rukban back to Florida with him. It’s a mission that Paws of War has helped numerous other soldiers with and that they have agreed to take on once again.

“Bringing a dog back from another part of the world like this is a true mission,” says Robert Misseri, co-founder of Paws of War. “There is a lot that is involved in doing it, including the paperwork, travel and medical expenses, and more. It’s a mission that we cannot succeed at without the assistance of people in the community who want to help support those who help defend the country.”

While it may seem like a true mission impossible to bring a dog back from the Middle East, Paws of War is well experienced at helping soldiers successfully pull it off. Being left in the Middle East when David’s unit is sent home would most likely be a death sentence. It’s an area of the world that sees dogs as pests and doesn’t treat them kindly as a result. When David found the dog he named Rukban, he was hungry, thirsty, and injured. He had a fresh neck wound and someone had previously cut his ears off, a common abuse toward dogs in that area.

Immediately going into action, David gave the dog food, water, and got it medical attention. He created a strong bond with Rukban as he nursed him back to health. Military protocol does not allow for soldiers to bring dogs back home with them, so David reached out to Paws of War for assistance.

“Rukban has been such a blessing to me while being in the Middle East,” says David. “I can’t imagine leaving him behind and what would become of him. Being able to bring him home to Florida with me would be amazing. I’m grateful that an organization like Paws of War exists to help with this mission, and I’m humbled that so many citizens give them the support they need to make it happen.”

Those who would like to a donation to help keep David and Rukban together, and help keep Rukban from being further abused, can log online to make a donation: pawsofwar.networkforgood.com/projects/56176-rukban.

Paws of War is an organization that focuses on serving veterans, law enforcement, and first responders. They are an all-volunteer organization that provides assistance to military members and their pets, and provides service and service dogs to veterans suffering from PTSD. To learn more about Paws of War or make a donation to support their efforts, visit their site at: pawsofwar.org.

About Paws of War

Paws of War is a 501c3 organization devoted to helping both animals and veterans. The Paws of War goal is to train and place shelter dogs to serve and provide independence to our United States military veterans that suffer from the emotional effects of war such as PTSD. In turn each veteran can experience the therapeutic and unconditional love only a companion animal can bring. To learn more about Paws of War, visit the site at  pawsofwar.org.

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Lake Forest, CA native participates in world’s largest international maritime warfare exercise

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Alvarado Landon

PEARL HARBOR – A 2011 El Toro High School graduate and Lake Forest, California, native is serving in the U.S. Navy as part of the world’s largest international maritime warfare exercise known as the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC).

Lt. j.g. Landon Alvarado is an electrical officer aboard USS O’Kane, currently operating out of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

A Navy electrical officer is responsible for electrical safety onboard the ship, as well as training new sailors in electrical safety.

Alvarado is looking forward to applying the lessons learned from Lake Forest to working in the Navy.

“My parents instilled the value of being a good person,” said Alvarado. “Taking the time to stop and talk to sailors can make a huge difference for them.”

As the world’s largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring safety at sea and security on the world’s oceans. RIMPAC 2018 is the 26th exercise in the series that began in 1971.

The theme of RIMPAC 2018 is “Capable, Adaptive, Partners,” according to Navy officials. The participating nations and forces will exercise a wide range of capabilities and demonstrate the inherent flexibility of maritime forces. These capabilities range from disaster relief and maritime security operations to sea control and complex warfighting. The relevant, realistic training program includes amphibious operations, gunnery, missile, anti-submarine and air defense exercises, as well as counter-piracy, mine clearance operations, explosive ordnance disposal and diving and salvage operations.

“I’m looking forward to being able to sail with foreign navies,” said Alvarado. “We haven’t had that opportunity before so it will be a huge learning experience.”

This is the first time Israel, Sri Lanka and Vietnam are participating in RIMPAC. Additional firsts include New Zealand serving as sea combat commander and Chile serving as combined force maritime component commander. This is the first time a non-founding RIMPAC nation (Chile) will hold a component commander leadership position.

This year will also feature live firing of a Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) from a U.S. Air Force aircraft, surface to ship missiles by the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force, and a Naval Strike Missile (NSM) from a launcher on the back of a Palletized Load System (PLS) by the U.S. Army. This marks the first time a land based unit will participate in the live fire event during RIMPAC. RIMPAC 2018 will also include international band engagements and highlight fleet innovation during an Innovation Fair.

“I’m proud of being a division officer, and seeing my sailors work with each other and see them grow,” said Alvarado.

Twenty-six nations, 46 surface ships, five submarines, more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel will participate in the biennial Rim of the Pacific Exercise. This year’s exercise includes forces from Australia, Brazil, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Colombia, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Israel, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Peru, the Republic of Korea, the Republic of the Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tonga, the United Kingdom, the United States and Vietnam.

As a member of the U.S. Navy, Alvarado and other sailors know they are part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes providing the Navy the nation needs.

“I’ve learned how much I can really accomplish without much guidance,” said Alvarado. “The Navy gives me the opportunity to take initiative. Serving in the Navy means I’m making a difference in the world, and that gives me a lot of pride.”

Additional information about RIMPAC is available at cpf.navy.mil

Source: navyoutreach.com

U.S. Department of Labor Announces Award of $47,600,000 In Training Grants to Help Homeless Veterans Re-enter the Workforce

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transitioning veteran shaking hands with employer

WASHINGTON, DC – U.S. Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta announced the award of 163 Homeless Veterans’ Reintegration Program (HVRP) grants totaling $47,600,000. This funding will provide workforce reintegration services to more than 18,000 homeless veterans.

“While serving in the military, veterans learn many skills desired in today’s workforce,” said Secretary Acosta. “These grants will help thousands of homeless veterans reintegrate themselves into society and secure good jobs.”

Funds are being awarded on a competitive basis to state and local workforce investment boards; local public agencies and nonprofit organizations; tribal governments; and faith-based and community organizations. Homeless veterans may receive occupational skills training, apprenticeship opportunities, and on-the-job training, as well as job search and placement assistance.

This year’s HVRP awards provide 40 first-year grants totaling nearly $13,000,000. Previous awardees will receive first and second option year grants totaling $34,600,000.

Grantees under the HVRP program will coordinate their efforts with other federal programs, such as the Veterans Affairs Supportive Services for Veteran Families program and the Department of Housing and Urban Development Continuum of Care program.

More information on the Department’s unemployment and re-employment programs for veterans is available at www.dol.gov/vets/. For more information about the Department’s Veterans’ Employment and Training Service (VETS), please visit veterans.gov or follow on @VETS_DOL twitter.

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World’s Largest Golf Outing Registration Now Open—Eighth Annual Event to Benefit Fisher House Foundation

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WLGO

Registration for this year’s World’s Largest Golf Outing (WLGO) – a national event on Monday, August 6 benefitting Fisher House Foundation – is now open.

The eighth annual WLGO is a simultaneous charity outing to be played on more than 100 golf courses coast to coast, plus Hawaii.  Since its inception in 2011, more than 57,000 men, women, juniors and seniors have played in 33 states to raise $3,764,603 for military and family charities. Several national celebrities have donated to WLGO, including PGA Tour Legend Chi Chi Rodriguez and 42nd President Bill Clinton.

“The generosity and the growth of the World’s Largest Golf Outing continues to impress,” says Peter Hill, Chairman and CEO of Billy Casper Golf that conceived WLGO. “It’s incredible to see the enduring appreciation for our brave men and women who sacrifice everything to protect and preserve our daily freedoms.”

Golfers can register as a single, twosome or foursome to play at participating courses near theme.  Cost varies by location and includes greens fees, shared carat, warm-up bucket of balls and lunch (if applicable), local prizes and awards ceremony following play. All golfers regardless of ability are welcome and a USGA handicap is not required.

Teams are encouraged to raise additional funds to support Fisher House; donations are made at worldslargestgolfouting.com.  Prizes are awarded for top donators and low scores.

Fun and emotion rule the day as participating courses honor the military with moments of silence, ceremonial tee shots, standing ovations, national anthems and color guards before play, patriotic decorations adorning fairways and greens and on-site military vehicles and fly-overs.  Hundreds of injured service men and women tee it up at WGLO host courses.

Since 1990, Fisher House Foundation has provided a “home away from home” for families of patients receiving treatment at major military and VA medical centers. Its network of 76 comfort homes has provided over 335,000 families with no-cost lodging, allowing families to be close by a while a loved one undergoes treatment and recovery.  One $10 donation covers costs to house a family in a Fisher House for one night.

“While funds from the World’s Largest Golf Outing are important, so is the awareness and a chance to share the Fisher House story,” says Dave Coker, President of Fisher House Foundation. “Thank you for your participation, generosity and support of those we call our greatest national treasure, our military service men and women and their loved ones.”

While WLGO is Hill’s brainchild, it is part of Billy Casper Golf’s giving culture.  The company’s namesake, the late Billy Casper, the Masters and two-time U.S. Open winner, served in the Navy, witnessing first-hand the effects of front-line combat.  He often entertained U.S. troops serving in Asia by hitting golf balls over aircraft carriers.

For more information. worldslargestgolfouting.com, 703.940.3600

Sailor Spotlights! Cryptologic Technician (Technical) Seaman Theodric Michael and Airman Jaiden Salem

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Seaman Michael and Airman Salem

MARSEILLE, France- Seaman Michael, left, and Airman Salem, from Anaheim, Calif., prepare to hoist the national ensign on the flight deck aboard the Nimitz-Class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). Harry S. Truman is currently deployed as part of an ongoing rotation of U.S. forces supporting maritime security operations in international waters around the globe.

On our planet, more than 70 percent of which is covered by water, being there means having the ability to act from the sea. The Navy is uniquely positioned to be there; the world’s oceans give the Navy the power to protect America’s interests anywhere, and at any time. Your Navy protects and defends America on the world’s oceans. Navy ships, submarines, aircraft and, most importantly, tens of thousands of America’s finest young men and women are deployed around the world doing just that. They are there now. They will be there when we are sleeping tonight. They will be there every Saturday, Sunday and holiday this year. They are there around the clock, far from our shores, defending America at all times.

(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Thomas Gooley/Released)

Source: outreach.navy.mil

 

Yes I Can—Program and Book Discovered by a Veteran, for Veterans

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Ray Simmons' Yes I Can Book

Yes I Can’s Guide to Better Living for Veterans

My name is Ray Simmons, and I am the President and Founder of Yes I Can, a non- profit organization. I wrote the book “A Guide to Better Living for Veterans” hoping it will transform the lives of Veterans in a positive way.

It was Joe Gallant, a Vietnam Veteran that inspired me to write this guide. He shared some stories with me about how many Veterans return home after fighting for our country, feeling unappreciated for all the sacrifices they’ve made for this country. Not to mention, our Veterans are committing suicide at such a high rate. This guide touches on several different subjects such as; Negative Attitude, Positive Attitude, Self Esteem, Motivation, Goals, Persistence, Patience, Procrastination, Art of Listening, and Communication. We included these subjects in our guide hoping it will change the psyche of our Veterans; generate values that are practical, meaningful and supportive of a healthy, vital lifestyle.

My goal is to make sure that every Veteran receives a Guide for Better Living as a gift from us, the Citizens of America whose freedom they fought to protect. I’m asking you to please help me put a guide in each Veterans hand. You can help a Veteran that you know by purchasing a Guide for him or her. If you don’t happen to know a Veteran you can still donate a guide to one. Did you know that there are 892,221 veterans in New York State? If each one of our Veterans were afforded the chance to receive a guide, it will be a life changing experience for a low cost of $13.90!

If you would like to learn more about Yes I Can or purchase a guide, you can visit our website at YesICanvets.com or if you would like to assist us in anyway to fulfill our goals in providing a guide to our Veterans, feel free to call our offices toll free number 1-888-612-3893 or 914-497-5509. All donations are tax deductible!!!!!

Thank you for giving me the wonderful opportunity to share a few valuable lessons that I have learned in my lifetime. The main purpose of this book is to help our Veterans change their perspective from negative to positive. I also want to heighten there self –esteem. For example, if it is low, this guide will give them the motivation that is necessary to reach any goal in life!

-Ray Simmons, Author of Yes I Can: A Guide to Better Living For Veterans.

In addition to our guide for better living, we offer a 8-week life changing program:

About the Program:
Purpose of Program: The purpose of the program is to bring a successful mind set to our CAN DO format. We will generate values that are practical, meaningful and supportive of a healthy, vital lifestyle for our participants.

Duration of Program: The program is delivered through workshops twice a week for one hour a day over the course of eight weeks.

Purpose of Subjects: The workshop is made up of ten subjects that will change the psyche of our Veterans. Below is a brief synopsis of each subject’s purpose.

The first subject is Negative Attitude. The goal of this subject is for participants to identify where negativity comes from. Throughout the workshop, we point out how negativity is habit forming, just like drugs, alcohol, and food. In addition, we show how negativity can affect your health, even shorten your life. As a result, it will help our participants rid negative habit(s), if they possess one.

The second subject is Positive Attitude. This subject points out the benefits of having a positive attitude.  Throughout the workshop, we show the participants how having a positive attitude can keep them healthy, help them to live longer, as well as prevent diseases.

The third subject is Self Esteem.  Throughout the workshop the participants will gain an understanding that having a high positive self -esteem is extremely essential for a happy and fulfilling life and they are what they think they are. This subject will help them to think highly of themselves. As a result, the participants will have high positive selves esteem and love to appreciate themselves. Also, realize how special they are.

The fourth subject is Motivation. This subject will help the participants identify what motivates their thoughts and actions. They will understand that their thoughts and actions create their realities. As a result, they will be aware of what motivates them so their realities will be what they desire them to be.

The fifth subject is Goals. This subject teaches the participants how to set goals and fulfill their goals in life.  They will learn that life means to have purpose and goals. On the contrary, death means to do nothing and go nowhere. As a result, this subject will motivate the participants to soar to heights that they didn’t know they could reach.

The sixth subject is Persistence. This subject teaches the participants how to continue to pursue goals when faced with opposition. They will learn how to endure the storm of disappointments no matter how many times the door of rejection closes. As a result, they will know that a winner never quits, and a quitter never wins.

The seventh subject is Patience. This subject teaches the participants how to calmly tolerate delay. They will start to realize anything worth having is worth waiting for. As a result, they will become wise enough to know that there is a time for everything and you can get where you need to be if you just be patient.

The eighth subject is Procrastination. This subject teaches the participants the value of getting the job done today and not waiting for tomorrow. The goal is to help the participants realize that every minute that passes, is a minute that they’ve missed an opportunity. In addition, they are taught how to manage their time so that they will learn to appreciate time and its value.

The ninth subject is the Art of Listening. This subject teaches the participants how to be an empathetic listener. Throughout this workshop, they will learn the art of listening to understand, opposed to listening to reply. In addition, we point out how important it is for someone to know that you truly understand his or her problem. As a result, the participants will listen to understand.

The tenth subject is Communication. This subject teaches the participants that communication is the most important skill in life. They will learn how to read body language because sixty percent of a message is told by the body not the words.

Get the details about the program and order your copy of the book today at yesicanvets.com

Guardians of Rescue Seek Support in Helping Airmen Bring Rescued Dogs Back Home

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therapy dog with soldier

Military members stationed in the Middle East are subjected to some brutal conditions, but every once in a while something happens that puts a smile on their face and brings them some comfort. That’s exactly what happened to two airmen, who within days of each other were brought together with puppies in need of rescue.

They rescued the dogs and went on to create strong bonds with them. Now, the Guardians of Rescue are working to help the airmen bring the dogs back home to America with them for good. “They have created inseparable bonds with these dogs and can’t imagine leaving them behind in the Middle East as they come back home to the states,” Robert Misseri, founder and president of Guardians of Rescue, an animal rescue organization. “We have helped other airmen bring dogs back home with them, and we are going to help these two as well. As they fight for us, we will be fighting for them.”

The two dogs will be arriving at John F. Kennedy International Airport in July. They will stay in New York for a few weeks before being transported by Guardians of Rescue to El Paso, Texas, where both of the airmen live. The two men, Staff Sgt. Dustin Fulmer (originally from Omaha, NE) and Senior Airman Jordan Jensen (originally from Ludington, MI) will be reunited with the dogs when they return home from the Middle East.

In the midst of a bad sandstorm, the two men had come across a 4-foot wood stake sticking up out of the ground with a rope tied to it. They immediately thought it was another IED, but it ended up being a tiny puppy with a rope around its neck. The puppy lay in agony, with its ears having been cut off, likely with a dull knife. The dog was full of blood and flies were surrounding it. With only hours left to live, Jensen scooped her up, knowing he could not leave her behind. He nursed him back to health, naming him Kral, and they quickly became inseparable. It was only days later when out on another mission that Fulmer found a litter of dying puppies that he tried to save. The survivor of that litter became his best friend, a beautiful puppy he named Syri.

Both puppies were lucky enough to be saved by these two heroic airmen.therapy dog with soldierOver the months that followed, they created strong bonds with them. Both of them faced a big challenge, knowing that they would not be comfortable leaving the beloved dogs behind when they went back to America. That’s when Guardians of Rescue stepped in to help bring them back home, as they have done for other military members. The lengthy mission of bringing them back to the U.S. was begun in the middle of the night by former military personnel. The dogs are currently being held in the country of Jordan, where there has been a holy war against dogs since October 2017, as they wait for their flight to the U.S.

“We know that everyone wants to see these dogs be brought back home and the airmen reunited with them,” adds Misseri. “This is a great way for people to help military members. They can make a donation to help cover the costs of making this reunion happen. We can’t do it without the support of the public.” Those wishing to help bring the airmen’ dogs back to the U.S. can make a donation online: guardiansofrescue.networkforgood.com/projects/54645-the-hero-duo-kral-syri.

Guardians of Rescue provides assistance to animals out on the streets. They are located in Long Island, New York, and they help animals in many places beyond where they are located. They are also instrumental in helping military members with their pets. To learn more, get involved, or to make a donation to support the Guardians of Rescue, log onto guardiansofrescue.org.

About Guardians of Rescue
Based in New York, Guardians of Rescue is an organization whose mission is to protect the well-being of all animals. They provide aid to animals in distress, including rehabilitation, assisting other rescue groups, and providing support to families, both military and not, who need assistance due to economic factors. To learn more about Guardians of Rescue, visit the site at www.guardiansofrescue.org

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