U.S. Department of Labor Announces Award of $47,600,000 In Training Grants to Help Homeless Veterans Re-enter the Workforce

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transitioning veteran shaking hands with employer

WASHINGTON, DC – U.S. Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta announced the award of 163 Homeless Veterans’ Reintegration Program (HVRP) grants totaling $47,600,000. This funding will provide workforce reintegration services to more than 18,000 homeless veterans.

“While serving in the military, veterans learn many skills desired in today’s workforce,” said Secretary Acosta. “These grants will help thousands of homeless veterans reintegrate themselves into society and secure good jobs.”

Funds are being awarded on a competitive basis to state and local workforce investment boards; local public agencies and nonprofit organizations; tribal governments; and faith-based and community organizations. Homeless veterans may receive occupational skills training, apprenticeship opportunities, and on-the-job training, as well as job search and placement assistance.

This year’s HVRP awards provide 40 first-year grants totaling nearly $13,000,000. Previous awardees will receive first and second option year grants totaling $34,600,000.

Grantees under the HVRP program will coordinate their efforts with other federal programs, such as the Veterans Affairs Supportive Services for Veteran Families program and the Department of Housing and Urban Development Continuum of Care program.

More information on the Department’s unemployment and re-employment programs for veterans is available at www.dol.gov/vets/. For more information about the Department’s Veterans’ Employment and Training Service (VETS), please visit veterans.gov or follow on @VETS_DOL twitter.

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National Veterans Memorial and Museum to Open October 27

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NVMMC

There are more than 20 million living veterans throughout the United States, from our Greatest Generation to our recent heroes coming home from Afghanistan and Iraq. And yet, there is no single monument or museum dedicated to the Veteran’s experience.

There are institutions that focus on specific conflicts or branches of service, but there hasn’t been a place for us all to join together to celebrate and honor the sacrifice of all of our veterans, past and present…until now.

The National Veterans Memorial and Museum (NVMM), officially designated by the Federal Government, will officially open on Saturday, October 27, 2018 from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. The NVMM will host a dedication and grand opening ceremony that will feature distinguished veterans whose stories are highlighted in the museum, military leadership and appearances or performances by men and women of the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard and Reserves. General Colin Powell (U.S. Army, Retired) will deliver the keynote address. The public is encouraged to attend the dedication to celebrate the opening of this historic institution.

The museum, located at 300 W. Broad Street, Columbus, OH 43215, will open immediately after the dedication and will remain open until 9 p.m. that evening to allow as many guests as possible to experience the exhibits.

Please RSVP for the Dedication and Grand Opening Ceremonies at nationalvmm.org/grandopening/.

Air Guard Twins Serve Together for Nearly 20 Years

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Serving in the Air National Guard is often a family tradition. Many people follow in the footsteps of their grandparents, parents, or siblings, and sometimes serve alongside them.

However, it’s not very often that people get to say that they are serving alongside their twin.

Air Force Senior Master Sgt. Tabatha King, newly selected chief enlisted manager of the 178th Communications Flight; and Air Force Master Sgt. Tammy Remley, senior noncommissioned officer in charge of inspections for the 178th Inspector General Office, have been serving together at the 178th Wing for the past 19 years. With strikingly similar facial features, it is easy to see how one might confuse this set of identical twins.

King enlisted in the Ohio Air National Guard January 29, 1995, after graduating from high school. She joined for the education benefits, planning to pursue her bachelor’s degree.  Photo:Senior Master Sgt. Tabatha King, newly selected Chief enlisted manager of the 178th Communications Flight, left, and Master Sgt. Tammy Remley, Senior NCO in charge of inspections with the 178th Inspector General Office, pose for a photo April 26 at Springfield-Beckley Air National Guard Base in Springfield, Ohio. King and Remley are identical twins and have been serving together in the Ohio Air National Guard at the 178th Wing for 19 years. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Airman First Class Amber Mullen)

Always Goal-Oriented

“I have always been very goal-oriented, and have had things I wanted to achieve—I joined the guard for my education,” King said.

Through the Air National Guard, King has earned an associate’s degree in applied science/information management, and an associate’s degree in applied science/information systems technology. She will earn a bachelor’s degree in applied management this fall.

After seeing her sister thriving in the military and doing well for herself, Remley decided that she needed to change her life as well. Remley enlisted in the Ohio Air National Guard on September 29, 1999.

“I was pregnant in high school so I couldn’t join,” Remley said. “I had no intention of ever joining the military. But, three years later, I needed to do something to better my life and my son’s life.”

Being able to serve side by side has been extremely beneficial for both twins during their careers. Throughout different career changes during their time in the military, the twins have always been each other’s biggest supporter.

“We push each other constantly,” King said. “She’s my go-to person all of the time. Every time I question or doubt myself, she’s always there encouraging me and picking me up.”

Close Sisterly Bond

The twins said they inspire and motivate each other.

“She has been my rock,” Remley said of her sister. “She just [gives me] ways to look forward and get past the obstacles I may be dealing with. It’s great that she’s just a phone call away or even just 10 to 15 steps away.”

Airmen build strong bonds with one another throughout the course of their careers, creating a family atmosphere within the Air National Guard. For King and Remley, this family bond extends beyond the workplace.

“I have been enlisted for 23 years,” King said. “I’ve loved every aspect of being in the guard, and being in it with my sister. When they say the guard is family oriented, it truly is.”

Source: defense.gov

Sailor Spotlight! Huntington Beach, CA sailor performs with U.S. Navy Band

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Country Current tour in Pensacola, Florida

PENSACOLA, Fla. – Musician 1st Class Henry Johns, of Huntington Beach, California, performs with the U.S. Navy Band Country Current at the historic Saenger Theater in Pensacola, Florida.

Country Current is on a ten-day tour through the southeastern United States, visiting nine cities and connecting Americans to their Navy. (U.S. Navy photo by Senior Chief Musician Melissa Bishop/Released).

The United States Navy Band Country Current is the Navy’s premier country-bluegrass ensemble. The group is nationally renowned for its versatility and “eye-popping” musicianship, performing a blend of modern country music and cutting-edge bluegrass. This seven member ensemble employs musicians from diverse backgrounds with extensive high-profile recording and touring experience in the music scenes of Nashville, Tenn., New York, New Orleans and more. In the tradition of country music, each member is a skilled performer on multiple instruments. The band utilizes banjo, acoustic guitar, electric guitar, mandolin, fiddle, electric bass, upright bass, dobro, pedal steel guitar and drum set.

Source:
outreach.navy.mil

Missouri Mother and Son Enlist in Navy Together

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Mother and Son Join Navy

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (NNS) – Melissa Ensey, of Lebanon, Missouri, had no idea how significant the trip would become when she got in the car with her son, Curtis Abbott, to go explore his career options at several military recruiting stations.

After talking to the Army and Air force recruiters, they sat down at the desk of Navy Career Counselor 1st Class Shawn Dery. Something began to stir deep inside of her as she listened to what was possible for her son. Jokingly she said to him, “Too bad I can’t join too,” and Dery quickly responded, “you can.”

The Navy changed its age requirements in January 2018 to help meet rising recruiting goals, allowing eligible people to join up to age 39. Being 37, Ensey hadn’t thought about enlisting as a possibility, but when she found this out, her dreams of traveling the world, supporting her daughter through college, and continuing her own education seemed to be within her grasp.

For Abbott, joining the military had always been on his mind. The more he thought about the Navy and the lifestyle being a Sailor can offer, the more it just felt right. Living in a small town all his life made him restless, and for the 18-year-old, the prospect of traveling the world while learning valuable skills seemed like the perfect way forward.

When his mom began to express interest in joining too, he wasn’t sure what to think about it. However, after the initial surprise, it all actually made a lot of sense to him. “At first I was just a little perplexed,” said Abbott, “but it seems like it’ll be a really good thing for her. She can finish getting all the education she’s always wanted. Plus, my sister will be able to go to college.” Joining together creates different emotions for them than typical family members would have as their loved one leaves to join the Navy.  Ensey is especially nervous about basic training, but she’s happy that it can be a shared experience.

“It’s almost more comforting knowing that he’s going to be there too,” she said, “and I am excited for it.” For Dery, the whole situation was unlike anything he had done before in his nine years as a recruiter. Although after they hear the benefits of enlisting, he says it’s typical for a parent to say they wish they had joined when they were younger; he has never seen them act on it. “I just showed them the proof of it,” Dery said, speaking about what he did to make them both want to join, “I just show them what’s out there for them and let them make their own decisions.”

Working in Springfield, Missouri, Dery introduces a lot people from very small towns and rural areas to the possibilities the Navy can open up in their lives. He feels like he’s truly able to make a difference through recruiting. “It does make me feel good when I see people come from smaller towns and join the Navy and go off to see the world and do things they might not have ever been able to do,” said Dery.

Having worked with them extensively, Dery feels great about them completing the process and swearing in together. He says he’s confident they’ll be successful out in the Fleet. On August 21, in the Military Entrance Processing Station (MEPS) in Kansas City, Missouri, Ensey stood next to her son as they both raised their right hands and took the oath of enlistment into the U.S. Navy. “It was an emotional moment,” said Ensey. “Making this commitment alongside my son is something I will never forget. I’m proud of him and I hope he is proud of me.”

Ensey signed a contract to become a Master-at-Arms and part of the Navy’s security force, While Abbott will be entering as a Logistics Specialist to work in the Navy’s supply field. Both said they are equally excited to be a part of the Navy, securing a career, college opportunities and the pride that comes with serving a grateful nation. The Navy’s recruiting force totals over 6,100 personnel in more than 1,000 recruiting stations around the globe. Their combined goal is to attract the highest quality candidates to assure the ongoing success of America’s Navy. NRC consists of a command headquarters, two Navy Recruiting Regions, 20 Navy Recruiting Districts and six Navy Talent Acquisition Groups that serve more than 1,000 recruiting stations across the country. For more news from Commander, Navy Recruiting Command, go to http://www.cnrc.navy.mil. Follow Navy Recruiting on Facebook (www.facebook.com/NavyRecruiting), on Twitter (@USNRecruiter) and on Instagram (USNRecruiter).

Source: outreach.navy.mil

Sharon Caples McDougle is somewhat of a “hidden figure”

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Sharon McDougle with Mae Jamison

Everyone knows that Dr. Mae Jemison was the first African American woman to travel into space – but many don’t know that an African American woman “suited her up”. McDougle was Jemison’s suit tech for the historic mission STS-47 aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavor September 12, 1992.

McDougle worked closely with her during her training leading up to launch, as well as actual launch day and landing of the space shuttle – taking care of all of her assigned crew escape equipment – her suit, helmet, writing utensils, even her diaper.

McDougle joined the NASA family through Boeing Aerospace Operations in 1990 where she worked as a Flight Equipment Processing Contract team member in the Space Shuttle Crew Escape Equipment (CEE) department. She began her career as a CEE Suit Technician and was responsible for processing the orange launch and entry suit (LES) assemblies worn by all NASA space shuttle astronauts. She was assigned to her first mission STS-37 within a year. McDougle was one of only two women CEE Suit Technicians and the only African American technician when she began her career.

In 1994 McDougle was promoted to the position of Crew Chief making her the first female and first African American Crew Chief in CEE. In her new position she was responsible for leading a team of technicians to suit up astronaut crews. She was responsible for leading her team and ensuring the astronaut crews were provided with outstanding support during suited astronaut training, launch, and landing events. In 1998, United Space Alliance (USA) absorbed the Boeing Aerospace Operations contract and McDougle continued in her position as a CEE Crew Chief employed by USA. She traveled to Kennedy Space Center quite often where she worked in support of many space shuttle launches. As Crew Chief McDougle had the honor of leading the first and only all-female suit tech crew supporting space shuttle mission STS-78.

In 2004 McDougle became the first female and first African American promoted to the position of Manager of the CEE Processing department. In this position, she managed the team of 25+ employees responsible for processing the Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES) and related equipment worn by the astronaut crews aboard the space shuttle. Her team assisted the astronaut Sharon McDougle and Lt. Uhuracrews in donning/doffing the suit, testing the equipment, strapping the astronauts into the space shuttle before launch, and recovering the crew upon landing. She held this position until the Space Shuttle Program ended in 2011. Sharon continued working until 2012 to help close-out the program, ending an illustrious 22 year career with the space shuttle program.

Other notable African-American astronauts McDougle has suited up: Charles Bolden, Frederick Gregory, and Dr. Bernard Harris.

During her career she was recognized with the Astronaut “Silver Snoopy” Award, Space Flight Awareness Honoree Award, USA Employee of the Month Teamwork Award, USA Employee of the Month Community Service Award, and the coveted Women of Color in Flight Award from Dr. Mae Jemison recognizing her career as the first and only African American woman suit tech/crew chief in her field. She absolutely loved her job and is proud to have been a part of our nation’s historic Space Shuttle Program.

McDougle was recognized by her home state as a 2018 Mississippi Trailblazer at the 16th Annual Mississippi Trailblazers Awards Ceremony and Black Tie Gala where she received two awards: the Calvin “Buck” Buchanan “FIRST” Award named for Mississippi’s first United States Attorney for the Northern District – honoring a Mississippian who holds the distinction of being the “first” in their profession and the Dr. Cindy Ayers “Legacy” Award honoring a Trailblazer whose singular work and contributions will leave a legacy long after their life has ended.

Most recently, McDougle received the Lifetime Achievement award from the Moss Point Visionary Circle during their 6th Annual Living Legends Ball for her military service and NASA career.

McDougle is also a United States Air Force (USAF) veteran, which is where she began her aerospace career in 1982 after graduating from high school. She served proudly in the Strategic Air Command (SAC) as an Aerospace Physiology Specialist at Beale Air Force Base, CA (1982-1990), reaching the rank of Sergeant (E-4).

During her enlistment she was a member of the Physiological Support Division (PSD). McDougle was responsible for training the SR-71 and U-2/TR-1 (“spy planes”) reconnaissance aircraft pilots on high altitude operations. She performed hazardous duty as an inside observer chamber technician and as a chamber operations team member during hypobaric (altitude) and hyperbaric (dive) chamber operations. During the hypobaric chamber flights crewmembers learned firsthand how hypoxia affects their judgment while flying an aircraft. The crewmembers were taught and practiced how they would handle these types of situations and the importance of wearing all equipment correctly.

McDougle also inspected and maintained flight equipment used for the SR-71 and U-2/TR-1 missions. The equipment included full pressure suit ensembles (helmet, gloves, boots, etc.), harness assemblies, and survival equipment (seat kits and parachutes, and emergency oxygen systems). She sized and fitted crewmembers’ pressure suits, assisted crewmembers in donning and doffing their suits, and performed functional tests before takeoff. She also loaded the survival seat kits and parachutes into the aircraft, strapped-in the crewmembers before take-off, and recovered the crew upon landing.

• 1982 – Graduated from Moss Point High School (Moss Point, MS)
• 1982-1990 – served in the United States Air Force as an Aerospace Physiology Specialist
• 1990 – Joined Boeing Aerospace Operations/Space Shuttle Crew Escape Equipment (CEE), becoming the first African American CEE Suit Technician
• 1992 – Suited up Dr. Mae Jemison, the first woman of color to travel into space (STS-47)
• 1994 – Promoted to Crew Chief, becoming first African American (male or female) CEE Crew Chief
• 1996 – Led the first and only all-female suit tech crew (STS-78)
• 2004 – First and only African American (male or female) promoted to the position of Manager of the CEE department

McDougle spent much of her enlistment on temporary assignment traveling abroad to Greece, Korea, Japan, and England, as well as stateside locations, in support of the SR-71 and U-2/TR-1 reconnaissance aircraft missions. She separated from the Air Force in 1990 with an honorable discharge. During her enlistment she was awarded the Humanitarian Service Medal, Air Force Outstanding Unit Award (2 devices), Good Conduct Medal (1 oak leaf cluster), Training Ribbon, NCO Professional Military Education Ribbon, Longevity Service Award, and was also recognized as Airman of the Month.

Qualcomm Appoints Mark Fields and Kornelis Smit to its Board of Directors

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Qualcomm Incorporated (NASDAQ: QCOM) today announced the appointment of two highly-qualified and independent Directors to its Board of Directors: Mark Fields, former President and Chief Executive Officer of Ford Motor Company, and Kornelis (Neil) Smit, Vice Chairman of Comcast Corporation.

These new Directors bring extensive experience in senior leadership and board-level positions, as well as broad knowledge and relevant expertise that will be valuable to the Company as it works to execute against its strategic plan to drive growth in mobile, and capitalize on the opportunity of mobile intersecting a broader set of industries, such as automotive, the Internet of Things, networking and mobile compute.

“Mark and Neil are well-respected in their fields and bring a wealth of experience and critical business knowledge of different industries that are pertinent to Qualcomm,” said Jeffrey W. Henderson, Chairman of the Board, Qualcomm Incorporated. “The addition of these Directors is part of an ongoing process to ensure our Board is refreshed on a regular basis, and that the experience of the Board is aligned with the trajectory of the Company so that we can maximize stockholder value.”

About Mark Fields

Mark Fields served as President and Chief Executive Officer of Ford Motor Company from 2014 to 2017, and prior to this held the Chief Operating Officer role from 2012 to 2014. As CEO and COO at Ford, he was responsible for overseeing Ford’s fastest global manufacturing expansion in 50 years, managing the most-aggressive global product introduction schedule

in the company’s history and delivering record profitability. Mr. Fields joined Ford in 1989 and progressed through a number of leadership positions in the U.S., South America, Asia and Europe. He was Executive Vice President & President of the Americas from 2005 to 2012, Executive Vice President and Chief Executive Officer of Premier Automotive Group and Ford Europe from 2004 to 2005, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the Premier Automotive Group from 2002 to 2004, and was President and Chief Executive Officer of Mazda Motor Corporation from 2000 to 2002. Mr. Fields has served on the Boards of Ford (2014 to 2017), IBM (2016 to April 2018) and Mazda (1999 to 2002), as well as serving on boards of four private companies on behalf of TPG Capital.

About Kornelis (Neil) Smit

Neil Smit serves as a Vice Chairman of Comcast Corporation, working with Comcast leaders to develop future technology-oriented business opportunities. Previously, Mr. Smit served as President of Comcast Cable from 2010 to 2011, and then President and Chief Executive Officer of Comcast Cable from 2011 to 2017, where he helped build Comcast Cable into the top cable and broadband company in the nation. Prior to this, Mr. Smit was at Charter Communications where he served as President and Chief Executive Officer and a Director from 2005 to 2010. Prior to joining Charter, Mr. Smit was President of Time Warner’s America Online Access business, where he oversaw Internet access services, including America Online (AOL), CompuServe and Netscape ISPs. Mr. Smit was a regional President with Nabisco, and held several management positions at Pillsbury. For five and a half years, he served on active duty with the Navy SEAL Teams and retired from the service as a Lieutenant Commander. Mr. Smit has held several board positions: Chairman, Vice Chairman, and served on the audit committee of CableLabs; Chairman of C-SPAN; and Chairman, Treasurer and Secretary of the National Cable & Telecommunications Association (NCTA). He also served on the Executive Committee of The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s Board of Trustees.

Continue onto Qualcomm’s Press Room to read the complete article.

Working for the federal government

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Employer welcoming veteran

If you’re making the military-to-civilian transition, there are a number of benefits to working for the federal government. If you have been separated or retired from military service for a while and working in the civilian world, you know things are different on the outside. Some people make the military-to-civilian transition easily while others have a harder time with it. Some never fully adjust.

If you are one that has given adequate time to make the adjustment and it just is not happening, you could be a good candidate for employment in government service at the federal level. Besides having a structure similar to the military, there are a host of benefits that you can get from working for the federal government, like:

✪✪Annual Leave
✪✪Sick Leave
✪✪Military Leave
✪✪Credit for Retirement
✪✪Participation in the Thrift Savings Plan

Annual Leave
Annual Leave is a term the federal government uses for“vacation time.” Most new employees coming in from the civilian world without prior military or federal service start at the bottom of the benefits ladder at 4 hours per bi weekly pay period, which equates to 13 days per year. However, military service can count toward annual leave accrual. With at least three years of military service but less than 15 years, annual leave starts at 6 hours per pay period or 20 days of leave per year, instead of 4 hours/13 days. More than 15 years of military service (but less than retirement eligibility at 20 years in most cases) starts at an even higher rate at one day per pay period or 26 days per year.

Sick Leave
In addition to annual leave, the federal government gives you paid time off if you are sick— 4 hours per pay period. While annual leave accrual increases with longevity, sick leave does not; it is a constant 4 hours per pay period.

Military Leave
Federal government employees also serving their country as members of the National Guard or Reserves get up to 15 days per year of paid military leave they can use to fulfill their military obligations. Not only do they get paid from their job, but they also collect their military pay. Most civilian companies make employees take vacation time or leave without pay for military training. Some companies make up the difference between the two pays if military pay is lower than their civilian pay.

Credit for Retirement
Former military members have an option worth considering—making a deposit for military service. Under this benefit, one can make a deposit into their retirement account based on their amount of basic military pay. For example, for a FERS employee the amount is 3 percent. This deposit increases the amount of retirement from the federal government service once retirement eligible. For military separated employees, it is a way to use their military service time to increase retirement pay.

On the other hand, members retired from military service have the option to draw their military retirement pay without making a deposit or to waive their military retirement in lieu of making a deposit into their retirement account. An experienced financial planner in this area can advise which is the better way to go.

Participate in the Thrift Savings Plan
The federal government also has its own retirement savings and investment plan called Thrift Savings Plan or TSP—the same basic plan used by the military. Similar in nature to 401(k) plans on the outside, federal government employees can designate an amount each pay period that will go into their TSP account. The advantage over many civilian companies is that the federal government also contributes to your account: 1 percent automatic and up to 5 percent matching. In other words, you automatically get 1 percent put into your TSP account whether you contribute to it or not. However, if you do contribute to your account, they will match what you put in up to a maximum of 5 percent per pay period, along with the automatic 1 percent. TSP is above and beyond the standard retirement pay. And if you left your TSP in when you got out of the military, you can transfer it over to the federal government side.

As you can see, being a former military member and working for the federal government has many advantages to it besides being a structured environment more like you were used to while serving in the military. Paid leaves, retirement credit, TSP, retirement and job stability just add to the appeal of continuing service to your country by working for the federal government.

Source: clearancejobs.com

About the Author
Ron Kness retired in November 2007 as a Senior Noncommissioned Officer after serving 36 years of service with the Minnesota Army National Guard of which 32 of those years were in a fulltime status, along with being a traditional guardsman. Kness takes pride in being able to still help veterans, military members, and families as they struggle through veteran and dependent education issues.

10 Toughest Job Interview Questions — And How to Answer Successfully

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Interview questions

We’ve all been there—pleased that an interview was going really well until the interviewer threw out a real doozy of a question that you just don’t know how to answer. But you don’t have to panic.

We asked career coach Hallie Crawford to give us advice on how to answer the most difficult questions you’ve ever been asked. (Yes, we pulled them from real interviews.) Here’s how to answer each really well.

1. If your current employer had an anniversary party for you, what five words would be written on the cake to describe you?

While it may seem silly, “this question is designed to reveal how you think your manager perceives you,” Crawford says. “Before answering, ask yourself: how do your coworkers describe you? What did your manager commend you on recently?” With the answers to these questions in mind, “don’t be afraid to get a little creative with your reply,” Crawford says. But don’t be too verbose either. “You don’t want to give the impression that your anniversary cake would be too big,” she says, “so try and keep the words short and sweet.”

2. Who in history would you want to go to dinner with and why?

Before you answer this one, ask yourself whom you admire, past and present. “Perhaps a writer, an actor, a scientist, or even someone from your industry,” suggests Crawford. Then, consider, “what do you appreciate about their accomplishments? Why do they inspire you? Why do you feel that you would be friends? What would you want to discuss with them at dinner?” Crawford prompts you to ask yourself. “Use these elements when answering.”

3. Name a brand that represents you as a person.

Yep, not a brand you love—but one that embodies who you are. Now that’s a doozy. But it doesn’t have to be tough, Crawford says. “Think about your top personal values,” Crawford advises. “Now think about brands that also have those values. For example, if you value family and ethical practice, think about companies who are family-based, or create products for families who you know don’t do testing on animals, for example. Explain the values that you feel you share with the brand and why those values are important to you.”

4. Please describe an instance where you had to make a decision without all of the necessary information.

You came to the interview prepared, which means you have a list of accomplishments you can work from. Using an accomplishment for this question, “describe the situation and what information was missing and any measurable results achieved,” Crawford instructs. By using an accomplishment, you will show a hiring manager how you can persevere.

5. Sell me on one idea, and then sell me on the opposite of that idea.

“First of all, you want to think of an idea before you can start answering the question,” says Crawford. You may not have to come up with your own idea. “Ask the hiring manager if they have a specific idea in mind,” says Crawford. “If not, consider a recent idea that you discussed with your team or with coworkers. What was your position and why? What was the opposite position and why? Use those arguments. In this question, it is important that you sound convincing when presenting both ideas. This will provide insight into whether you are able to present ideas to your team—even if you don’t agree with the idea.”

6. If a coworker had an annoying habit, and it hindered your quality of work, how would you resolve it?

This may seem like a perplexing question, but it’s “designed to get to you how you deal with others,” explains Crawford. “Draw from a real-life experience if possible. What annoyed you? How did you resolve it? Is there a more effective way to handle the situation if it would happen again? Identify the annoying habit and then outline the steps you would take to try and resolve the situation while maintaining a good relationship with your coworker.”

7. What part of the newspaper do you read first? What does this say about you?

“This kind of question is asked to get to know you better as a person,” says Crawford. And while “at first glance, this seems a fairly easy question,” she says, it’s not. So, “before you answer, think about what genre of articles appeals to you: technology, fashion, current events,” Crawford advises. “Now determine if there is a way to link the genre that appeals to you as a professional. For example, if you are drawn to articles about technology, you could explain that your love of technology means that you enjoy learning new ways of doing things, you are open to change, and look to stay on top of current trends.”

8. Throw your resume aside and tell me what makes you you.

This is another question designed not to trip you up, Crawford says, but to get to know you better. “Keep in mind that they may have looked you up online and have your cover letter, so do your best not to just repeat something they have already read about you,” she says. “Instead, is there a background story about how you got into your industry? Can you explain your unique selling proposition—why you are unique in your industry? Or, you could explain your top three values and why they are important to you.”

9. What’s wrong with your past or current employer?

At all costs, “remember that you want to avoid bashing your current or past employer and the company,” warns Crawford. “This question is designed to find out why you are looking for a new job. Instead of focusing on them, focus on you. Are you looking for more career growth that what is offered where you currently work? Or a more challenging position?”

10. Tell me about the worst manager you ever had.

Before you bash your last boss, “remember that your hiring manager has your resume and knows where you have worked, so your managers won’t be completely anonymous,” warns Crawford. “However, you might explain a type of management style that wasn’t ideal for you. And if you haven’t had a bad manager, don’t make one up. Let the hiring manager know that you honestly have gotten along with your previous managers, and focus on how you are able to work with different personality and management styles.”

The article was originally posted on Glassdoor.com

La Fleet Week 2018 Navy Film Festival To Celebrate 100 Years Of Navy In Hollywood

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Fleet Week 2018

SAN PEDRO, Calif. – Featuring black-and-white to modern-era films, LA Fleet Week® 2018 presented by Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan on Amazon Prime Video will include a Labor Day Weekend Navy Film Festival at the iconic Warner Grand Theatre in downtown San Pedro. 

The Festival will celebrate the century-long relationship between the US Navy and the world-renowned film industry that has brought military life, storylines and battle realities to the big screen since 1918.

“This Festival marks a milestone for the US Navy and Hollywood, highlighting the ways that movies have—and will continue to—shape what we think about the military, as well as the men and women who serve,” said US Navy retired Rear Admiral Mike Shatynski, co-founder and board member of the LA Fleet Week Foundation. “As a kid growing up in LA, military-themed movies definitely were something that influenced my decision to serve my country and see the world.”

The festival will also commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Fleet Combat Camera units, groups of service personnel assigned to filming and documenting the history and activities of the US Navy and other branches.  Since World War II, Combat Camera footage has been featured in Hollywood movies and Navy documentaries, and used for military training and educational purposes. The Festival will honor the Navy’s Combat Camera unit, which is slated to be decommissioned this year.

The film festival will screen six different classic films from Sept. 1-3 at the historic Warner Grand Theatre in San Pedro, with each night featuring a different theme. The first film each night will be shown at 5:00 p.m. and the second at 8:15 p.m. The first episode of the new series “Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan” will be shown between each feature film, compliments of Amazon Prime Video.

FILM FESTIVAL SCHEDULE
·        Saturday, Sept. 1 – Marine Corps Night
o   “Sands of Iwo Jima” – John Wayne WWII classic, 1949
o   Battle: Los Angeles” – Marine Corps versus aliens in Los Angeles, 2011

·        Sunday, Sept. 2 – Navy Air Night
o   “Hell Divers” – Classic fighter pilot film starring Clark Gable and Wallace Beery, filmed aboard first aircraft carriers, 1931
o   “Top Gun” – Modern-day fighter pilot classic starring Tom Cruise, filmed aboard carriers with full Navy cooperation, 1986

·        Monday, Sept. 3 – Navy Ships & Subs
o   “Mister Roberts” – Classic comedy starring Henry Fonda, Jack Lemmon and James Cagney about a Navy cargo ship serving in the South Pacific in the waning days of WWII, 1955
o   “Hunt for Red October” – American espionage thriller adapted from the Tom Clancy best-selling novel, 1990

Ticket sales start each day at 4:00 p.m., with doors opening at 4:30 p.m.  Admission is free for all active military, veterans and children under three years, and $5.00 (cash only) for all others. For theater location, details and most up-to-date information, visit lafleetweek.com.

Since its first venture into Hollywood more than a century ago, the US Navy has been recognized with three Academy awards for films it has produced, including Best Documentary Feature (“The Battle of Midway”) and Best Documentary Short Subject (“December 7th”) in 1943, and Best Documentary Feature (“The Fighting Lady”) in 1945.

About LA Fleet Week® 2018 presented by “Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan” on Amazon Prime Video
LA Fleet Week is an annual, multi-day celebration of our nation’s Sea Services held on the LA Waterfront at the Port of Los Angeles.  Free to the public, the Labor Day Weekend event features public ship tours, military displays, equipment demonstrations, live entertainment, a kids’ STEM Expo, aerial demonstrations, the LA Fleet Week® 2018 Navy Film Festival, the 10th Annual Conquer the Bridge Labor Day morning 5.3-mile walk/run over the Vincent Thomas Bridge, the LA Fleet Week 5 on 5 Basketball Tournament, and a Galley Wars presented by Princess Cruises culinary cook-off competition between Sailor, Marine, Coast Guard and Royal Canadian Navy teams.

LA Fleet Week is organized by the LA Fleet Week Foundation, in partnership with the Port of Los Angeles and City of Los Angeles.  Other LA Fleet Week 2018 sponsors include Amazon Prime Video, the Annenberg Foundation, Outfront Media, Delta Air Lines, Bob Hope USO, American Legion Post, Battleship IOWA, Princess Cruises, Andeavor, Clyde & Co., Providence Little Company of Mary, Sam’s Club and South Coast Plaza.

For more information, visit lafleetweek.org

Lake Forest, CA native participates in world’s largest international maritime warfare exercise

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Alvarado Landon

PEARL HARBOR – A 2011 El Toro High School graduate and Lake Forest, California, native is serving in the U.S. Navy as part of the world’s largest international maritime warfare exercise known as the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC).

Lt. j.g. Landon Alvarado is an electrical officer aboard USS O’Kane, currently operating out of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

A Navy electrical officer is responsible for electrical safety onboard the ship, as well as training new sailors in electrical safety.

Alvarado is looking forward to applying the lessons learned from Lake Forest to working in the Navy.

“My parents instilled the value of being a good person,” said Alvarado. “Taking the time to stop and talk to sailors can make a huge difference for them.”

As the world’s largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring safety at sea and security on the world’s oceans. RIMPAC 2018 is the 26th exercise in the series that began in 1971.

The theme of RIMPAC 2018 is “Capable, Adaptive, Partners,” according to Navy officials. The participating nations and forces will exercise a wide range of capabilities and demonstrate the inherent flexibility of maritime forces. These capabilities range from disaster relief and maritime security operations to sea control and complex warfighting. The relevant, realistic training program includes amphibious operations, gunnery, missile, anti-submarine and air defense exercises, as well as counter-piracy, mine clearance operations, explosive ordnance disposal and diving and salvage operations.

“I’m looking forward to being able to sail with foreign navies,” said Alvarado. “We haven’t had that opportunity before so it will be a huge learning experience.”

This is the first time Israel, Sri Lanka and Vietnam are participating in RIMPAC. Additional firsts include New Zealand serving as sea combat commander and Chile serving as combined force maritime component commander. This is the first time a non-founding RIMPAC nation (Chile) will hold a component commander leadership position.

This year will also feature live firing of a Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) from a U.S. Air Force aircraft, surface to ship missiles by the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force, and a Naval Strike Missile (NSM) from a launcher on the back of a Palletized Load System (PLS) by the U.S. Army. This marks the first time a land based unit will participate in the live fire event during RIMPAC. RIMPAC 2018 will also include international band engagements and highlight fleet innovation during an Innovation Fair.

“I’m proud of being a division officer, and seeing my sailors work with each other and see them grow,” said Alvarado.

Twenty-six nations, 46 surface ships, five submarines, more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel will participate in the biennial Rim of the Pacific Exercise. This year’s exercise includes forces from Australia, Brazil, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Colombia, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Israel, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Peru, the Republic of Korea, the Republic of the Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tonga, the United Kingdom, the United States and Vietnam.

As a member of the U.S. Navy, Alvarado and other sailors know they are part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes providing the Navy the nation needs.

“I’ve learned how much I can really accomplish without much guidance,” said Alvarado. “The Navy gives me the opportunity to take initiative. Serving in the Navy means I’m making a difference in the world, and that gives me a lot of pride.”

Additional information about RIMPAC is available at cpf.navy.mil

Source: navyoutreach.com