New Technology Alleviates Tinnitus by Retraining the Brain to Ignore Ringing in the Ears

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Tinntinitus

In Time for Tinnitus Week: New Approach Used During Sleep Offers Hope to Millions of People Who Suffer From the Most Common Health Condition in the U.S.

LOS ANGELES—David Giles, 57, began suffering from tinnitus as a teenager, when a firecracker went off near his ear. Giles says the debilitating condition, commonly known as “ringing in the ears,” has grown overpowering without going away.

He is one of as many as 50 million Americans suffering from tinnitus. Musicians, factory workers, military veterans and many others endure its effects, including problems with concentration, sleep, anxiety and depression.

Giles, who lives in Columbus, Ohio, traveled four hours to a doctor in East Lansing Michigan to try the Levo System, an FDA-approved technology that mimics the specific sounds of a patient’s individual tinnitus. The patient listens to the sounds through earbuds while sleeping. Because the brain is most responsive to sensory input during sleep, it grows accustomed to the sounds after a few months of treatment. It is a radically different approach that retrains the brain to ignore “ringing in the ears.”

New research underscores the promise of this approach.

A recently released randomized study by the National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research at the VA Portland Health Care System demonstrated improved clinical outcomes for tinnitus patients using the Levo System. The study was led by James Henry, PhD.

Study participants were assigned to the brain retraining technique using the Levo System or a commonly-used white noise masking machine. Patients using the Levo System reported the greatest improvement in tinnitus symptoms and the biggest decline in cognitive-related problems. These participants also reported the most significant improvement in their enjoyment of social activities and relationships with family and friends, key quality of life indicators.

For Giles, the Levo System was a life-changer. After a 90-day treatment, he reports that his tinnitus is no longer overpowering or debilitating, and has faded to the background, allowing him to enjoy his life as he once did.

Tinnitus affects a range of people, including those who are exposed to continuous noise. It is the leading service-related disability among U.S. veterans, according to the American Tinnitus Association.

The Levo System approach is grounded in the idea of personalized medicine. Rather than machines or doctors selecting sound matches in the customary fashion, patients choose the actual sounds they hear when they sleep. When patients take an active role addressing their tinnitus, they often feel a sense of mastery and control.

“It is gratifying to see so many people experience relief from a condition that has defied a long-term solution,” said Michael Baker, president and Oregon-based CEO of Otoharmonics Corp., which produces the Levo System. “Patients report the greatest improvement when they drive decisions about their treatment.”

The Levo System has been cleared by the Food and Drug Administration for marketing in the U.S. Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles is Otoharmonics’ majority stakeholder.

V.A. Study  http://AJA.pubs.asha.org/article.aspx?doi=10.1044/2017_AJA-17-0022

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Larry Broughton: Warrior in the Boardroom—Meditation for Beginners

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Meditation

You may think meditation is just for crossed legged gurus or new-age followers, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. Anyone (and everyone) can meditate, and derive its many mental, physical, and spiritual health benefits.

Mediation has been practiced for thousands of years, and has become a vital part of the lives of many professional athletes, CEOs, hardened military veterans, and parents alike because of its many benefits. During meditation, you develop intentional focus—minimizing random thoughts about the past or future. Meditation can help with concentration, relaxation, inner peace, stress reduction and fatigue. Because it may also help reduce blood pressure, relieve anxiety, depression, pain and insomnia, many current service members and transitioning veterans are finding mediation to be a valuable tool to combat the rigors of everyday life, in and out of uniform.

Meditation is a combination of focus and relaxation (not strictly one or the other). Those who practice the art of meditation say they come away with a greater level of concentration, awareness, positivity, and restful nature throughout the day. The more you practice mediation, the quicker you can tap into that feeling of bliss … and the more likely you’ll find peace throughout your busy day.

There’s no need to go to a yoga center or seek out a teacher. You just need a quiet place in your home, or maybe even your office with the door closed. There are many ways to meditate, but the simplest approach is often the best, and that means taking away the negative thoughts that intrude on a positive attitude, and replacing the negative with the positive. The goal is to achieve calmness and focus, and with consistent practice, it will happen.

An overwhelming number of leaders and high-achievers suffer from stress, and meditation is a good way to reduce it. Stress interferes with concentration and actually makes you sick, but meditation is the perfect way to cope with it. When we clear the clutter of stress from our mind, we’re able to focus more and be calm.

You don’t have to have total silence during your period of meditation, and it doesn’t have to be a long time. Ten or 15 minutes will do, but go as long as practical and makes you feel good (six minutes works for me each day as part of my morning routine). If you’ve never meditated before, start with two minutes, and work your way up in 30- or 60-second increments each day. Some folks have never tried to silence their mind or thoughts in the past, and may find this “exercise” to be uncomfortable or difficult at first. But, like anything new, give it a chance, and stick to it for 30 days … I promise you’ll find it well worth your time and effort.

Your level of silence is up to you. Some prefer to shut out all audible and visible stimuli. Some like to have soothing music in the background. Some like to be in total darkness, while others like to sit near a sunlit window. And, yes, one or two scented candles could be used.

No need to worry about twisting your body into a pretzel during meditation. Find a position that’s comfortable for you. The goal isn’t discomfort. It’s peace of mind. But not sleep. If you find yourself drifting off to sleep, realize that this isn’t meditation, nor the goal. A good posture helps, whether standing or sitting. It aids in breathing.

Clothes should be loose and comfortable to aid in circulation.

Where does the mantra, or humming come in? Repeating the one-syllable words like “Om” or “hummm” helps clear your mind and focus your thoughts on the meditation itself. It’s hard to think of other distractions when you’re concentrating on repeating your mantra.

“Om” is said to represent the one-ness of all creation, including the heavens, earth and underworld.

If you want to take a class with others, you can; but if you’re the self-starter type, you can find many guided mediations on YouTube that fit your style and level of comfort.

What’s been your experience with mediation? Are you up to a 30-day mediation challenge? Let me know about your experience.

2018 Outstanding Disabled Veteran of the Year overcomes invisible injuries to help fellow veterans, community

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DAV's Callie Rios-Disabled Veteran of the Year

Transforming adversity into a life of service, “Callie brings heart. And brings kindness to the chapter. She helps bring unity, helps bring some of the glue of the organization together.”

By Charity Edgar

When Callie Rios joined the military, she took an oath to defend her country and was prepared to face any enemy on behalf of the nation.

But she never expected to be attacked by a fellow soldier.

“I joined the military because I was a single parent, and I was looking for better job opportunities, a better life for my child,” explained Rios of her decision to enlist at age 18. “I followed in my family’s footsteps and became the first female in my family to join the military.”

Rios’ first duty station was in South Korea, and she thrived in the Army. But life was about to change drastically when she returned stateside.

“There was a turning point in my military career at Fort Knox when I was the victim of a sexual assault,” recalled Rios. “It really changed my perspective. I did not really find much support in my unit; I didn’t really find much support anywhere. It was a very lonely time for me.

“I came back out of it, and now I’m ready to help other women who were in the same situation as I was.” Rios is active in DAV Chapter 58 in Midland, Texas, serving as the junior vice commander.

“Callie brings heart. And brings kindness to the chapter,” said Chris Molsbee, the chapter’s senior vice commander. “[She] helps bring unity, helps bring some of the glue of the organization together.”

Molsbee emphasized that having Rios onboard has been critical for engaging other women veterans. He also commended her volunteer efforts.

“As the junior vice commander of the chapter, she is an intricate part of all of the charity events that we do,” said Molsbee.

In 2017, the chapter raised the most funds nationwide—more than $40,000—during Golden Corral’s Military Appreciation Night at the restaurant location in neighboring Odessa.

Rios is especially proud of her efforts to support fellow women veterans and military sexual trauma survivors. In 2017, Rios spearheaded a women veterans conference, Heroes in Heels, sponsored by the chapter. Incorporating mental health practitioners for former servicewomen with invisible wounds was an event priority.

“During our last year’s conference we had clinicians here that could talk to first responders, that could talk to veterans and kind of give them some insight on where they can get help and how they can get help,” explained Rios, who previously served as a deputy sheriff, patrolman and public safety officer in her civilian career.

“They also got to see some of us female veterans out there just rocking it, making sure everybody is taken care of, working toward a better future for all of our veterans,” she added. “It shows them there’s good things, there’s still good people, there’s still good things in life to be had.”

Rios understands firsthand how difficult it can be to overcome injuries that are invisible to everyone Callie Rios-Disabled Veteran of the Yearelse. She channels the trauma she sustained in the Army into supporting fellow veterans. This personal experience is what drives her commitment to ensuring others don’t hesitate to seek out mental health assistance.

Rios also invests a lot of time at Midland College. Previously a student veteran, Rios now holds a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice, so she understands the unique challenges former service members face on campus.

“She reaches out to people. She doesn’t sit back and wait for them to call her,” said Kay Schipper, an Air Force veteran and the VA coordinator for Midland College. “She’s always been there when I’ve called her when I’ve had a need, or a student [veteran]’s having a need.” Navy veteran Daniel Ortega agreed.

“Any program that DAV can touch to help the veterans lives improve, she’s all over it. It doesn’t take anything but a phone call to get her attention and to get her involved in that veteran’s life,” said Ortega, a graduate turned employee at the college.

Rios’ dedication to giving back extends beyond serving her fellow veterans. She also supports her community as a volunteer in the Texas State Guard, a military force that supports humanitarian missions throughout the state by augmenting the Texas Army National Guard and Texas Air National Guard.

After an honorable discharge from the Army, Rios found herself missing the sense of belonging she had found in the military.

“I was looking for something to help me transition to civilian life, and the Texas State Guard gave me a home,” she said.

“[Staff] Sgt. Rios has almost nine years in the Texas State Guard, which speaks to her volunteerism,” said Col. Jeremy Franklin, who commands the 39th Regiment. “Sgt. Rios actually deployed in response to Hurricane Harvey. She worked in an American Red Cross shelter operation. She also served in a pod, which is where we dispense supplies to civilians impacted by the disaster.”

There is another group of people who benefit from Rios’ dedication to giving back: her kids. “I think volunteering sets an example for them,” said Rios. “They see me do it, they want to do it, and it gives them more exposure to other people, and it also teaches them values.”

“I am proud to honor Callie for her commitment to veterans, her family, local community, Texas and the nation,” said DAV National Commander Delphine Metcalf-Foster. “Her resilience as a survivor of military sexual trauma and commitment to supporting men and women battling invisible injuries undoubtedly provides inspiration to our fellow injured veterans and their families. Her humble spirit and positive attitude are living testaments to DAV’s mission of empowering veterans to lead high-quality lives with respect and dignity.”

“I volunteer and I give back so much because I love people,” Rios stated. “If they can find a piece of my story that connects with them and helps them in any kind of way, it’s worth it for me.”

 

Hankook Tire Hosts DAV Honorees at 2018 MLB All-Star Game presented by Mastercard

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DAV MLB Attendees at baseball park

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Master Sergeant Jeff Johnson and Captain Jonathan Moak have at least two things in common: First, they’re avid baseball fans. Second – and more importantly – they serve in the United States military.

Photo Left to right: Master Sergeant Jeff Johnson, Deonne Johnson, Captain Jonathan Moak.

Hankook Tire America Corp., the Official Tire of Major League Baseball, thanked Johnson and Moak for their service by hosting them as honored guests at the 2018 MLB All-Star Game presented by Mastercard on Tuesday, July 17 at Nationals Park in Washington, D.C.

The rapidly growing global tire company welcomed Moak, Johnson and Johnson’s wife, Deonne, as part of its relationship with DAV [Disabled American Veterans], which selected the honorees. Hankook also invited its special guests to spend time in its suite, where they spoke with company leadership and met Baseball Commissioner Robert D. Manfred, Jr.

“The game was fantastic,” said Johnson, a resident of La Plata, Maryland who has served as an Aircraft Ordinance Specialist and Flight Chief in the United States Air National Guard. “Having the opportunity to see the best players up close like this is, of course, wonderful.”

Moak, a Captain in the United States Army Reserve from Alexandria, Virginia, agreed.

“The experience was incredible, and visiting the suite hosted by Hankook Tire America Corp. leadership was a very special time,” Moak said.

Johnson’s 20-year Air Force career includes three tours in Iraq and stints in Turkey, Curacao and at bases across the United States. Moak deployed as an Infantry Officer in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and recently transitioned to the Individual Ready Reserve after 13 years of service. Both are DAV members who ardently believe in the organization’s mission.

“DAV provides the connection for veterans to the benefits earned through service to country,” said Moak. “DAV helps vets transition to civilian life and gives the resources and tools necessary to do so.”

“My experience with [DAV] as I am transitioning to retirement has been exceptional,” Johnson said. “They provide highly knowledgeable professionals, free of charge, to help separating military members get all required information squared away and confirm we can access the benefits and services we’ve earned.”

The ticket giveaway is one of many ways Hankook Tire America Corp. is serving DAV in 2018. The company is partnering with tire dealers to host 12 mobile service stops, gave $175,000 to the organization and will sponsor a new seven-passenger DAV Transportation Network vehicle that will drive Nashville-area veterans to their medical appointments.

“Hankook Tire was delighted to host these courageous guests at the 2018 MLB All-Star Game,” said Wes Boling, Public Relations Manager for Hankook Tire America Corp. “As we enter our fourth year of partnership with DAV, we are honored to have an opportunity to serve those who have served us.”

To learn more about Hankook Tire’s relationship with DAV, visit www.dav.org/hankook.

About Hankook Tire America Corp.

Hankook Tire America Corp. is a growing leader in the U.S. tire market, leveraging investments in technology, manufacturing and marketing to deliver high-quality, reliable products that are safer for consumers and the environment. Headquartered in Nashville, Tennessee, Hankook America markets and distributes a complete line of high-performance and ultra-high-performance passenger tires, light truck and SUV tires as well as medium truck and bus tires in the United States. Hankook Tire America is a subsidiary of Hankook Tire Co., Ltd., a Forbes Global 2000 company headquartered in Seoul, Korea, and led by President and CEO Hyun Bum Cho.

About DAV

DAV empowers veterans to lead high-quality lives with respect and dignity. It is dedicated to a single purpose: fulfilling our promises to the men and women who served. DAV does this by ensuring that veterans and their families can access the full range of benefits available to them; fighting for the interests of America’s injured heroes on Capitol Hill; providing employment resources to veterans and their families and educating the public about the great sacrifices and needs of veterans transitioning back to civilian life. DAV, a non-profit organization with more than 1 million members, was founded in 1920 and chartered by the U.S. Congress in 1932. Learn more at dav.org.

ELAN Helps to Build a Personalized Smart Home for Wounded U.S. Veteran Through the Gary Sinise Foundation

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ELAN Smart Home

PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA, July 3, 2018 — After serving two tours in Iraq, U.S. Army SFC Jared Bullock trained for Special Forces and received a Green Beret in October 2013. Just a month later, on deployment in Afghanistan, an IED explosion on a routine patrol forever altered his life, leaving him without his right arm and leg.

After more than thirty surgeries, Bullock was recognized by the Gary Sinise Foundation’s R.I.S.E. program (Restoring Independence, Supporting Empowerment) to receive a smart home designed and built specifically to address his needs.

When U.S. Army SFC Bullock describes that fateful day in November of 2013, he refers to it as “an incident,” according to David Young, Owner & President of integration firm The Sound Room. That is Bullock’s personality: unapologetically upbeat, always looking forward, doing his best not to dwell on the past. Speaking with the Gary Sinise Foundation® about the incident, Bullock shared, “I knew that my life wasn’t over, and this was just another challenge. Challenges have always motivated me to push harder in life.”

Designing a modern home to fit the lifestyle of a wounded veteran involves technology that is customizable and extremely easy-to-use. To serve at the center of the smart home system, The Sound Room installed an ELAN® Control System and other Nortek Security & Control technologies that enable easy control of lighting, audio, video, window shades, a security system with cameras, motorized door locks, garage door control, two zones of climate control and a front door video intercom.

The user-intuitive ELAN control interface is available to U.S. Army SFC Bullock through the two ELAN touch panels in the master bedroom and great room, as well as on an iPad® and iPhone®. This way, he and his family can easily see who is at the front door, view security feeds, and see what equipment is currently on or off throughout the home. Young also personalized “home” and “away” settings – the “away” setting can be enabled from any connected device to automatically ensure that TVs and lights are turned off, security is activated, and the doors are closed and locked when the family leaves.

The designer and integrator worked together to build what is perhaps Bullock’s favorite area in theELAN Smart-Home home, the exercise room. Complete with a 43” 4K TV and a pair of SpeakerCraft® in-ceiling speakers, he is always hard at work keeping his body in top condition. His dedication to physical fitness and challenges is part of his identity, as evidenced by the 12-mile race he ran just 10 months after the IED incident. Since then he has competed in Spartan races, worked with child amputees, and been featured for his strength and resilience on Bodybuilding.com.

With a large amount of equipment involved – including two ELAN® touch-panels, 16 SpeakerCraft in-ceiling speakers, three Sony® 4K TVs, 16 Lutron® lighting dimmers, six 75” wide Lutron motorized window shades, home theater equipment and more – protecting the system is of paramount importance. The Sound Room relied on Panamax® VT4315-PRO power conditioners to ensure every component gets clean, consistent power for optimal operation, and a Panamax MB-1500 rack-mount battery backup to allow for safe operation and shutdown of all rack components in case of a power outage.

During the project, Young was impressed with his team’s willingness to donate their time and expertise to this project. “This project presented a few challenges, namely because it was 2.5 hours away from our home location,” he said. “But even considering that, as soon as I announced our involvement in the project, several team members volunteered to work for free in support of U.S. Army SFC Bullock. It was a proud moment, as it was when we finally handed him the iPad that serves as the keys and control surface for his home.”

The Sound Room also worked directly with other manufacturers to have additional items donated, including obtaining a free Luxul® networking system for the family. Toward the end of the project, a Verizon® cell phone signal booster was added to improve the mediocre cellular reception at the home.

U.S. Army SFC Bullock“The home for U.S. Army SFC Bullock was built to make his life at home as seamless as it could be with customized design,” concluded Judith Otter, Executive Director of the Gary Sinise Foundation. “We’re so honored to be a part of his journey and to better personalize his home to his needs. Without the generosity of Nortek Security & Control and our other partners, this wouldn’t be possible.”

About ELAN
ELAN, now part of Nortek Security & Control, develops an award-winning line of whole-house entertainment and control solutions distributed through a comprehensive channel of select dealers throughout the United States, Canada, and countries worldwide. The ELAN 8 update was honored with the “2017 Human Interface Product of the Year” award, and continues to expand its intuitive functionality with security, climate, surveillance and video distribution products and integrations. To learn more, visit www.elanhomesystems.com.

About Nortek Security & Control
Nortek Security & Control LLC (NSC) is a global leader in smart connected devices and systems for residential, security, access control, and digital health markets. NSC and its partners have deployed more than 4 million connected systems and over 25 million security and home control sensors and peripherals. Through its family of brands including 2GIG®, ELAN®, GoControl®, Linear®, Mighty Mule® and Numera®, NSC designs solutions for national telecoms, big box retailers, OEM partners, service providers, security dealers, technology integrators and consumers.

Headquartered in Carlsbad, California, NSC has over 50 years of innovation and is dedicated to addressing the lifestyle and business needs of millions of customers every day. For further information, visit nortekcontrol.com.

Other brand names and product names mentioned herein may be the trademarks, tradenames, service marks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.

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Free Mobile and Web Based App Assists Military Veterans and Advocates with Potential VA Benefits Claims

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nvlsp app

The National Veterans Legal Services Program (NVLSP) recently launched the first of its kind app for use by military veterans and their advocates, available for download through the NVLSP website, Apple App Store, or Google Play Store.

Named the NVLSP VA Benefit Identifier, the application helps veterans, with or without the assistance of a veteran’s service officer, determine specific VA benefits to which they are likely entitled.

Veteran Rob Concklin found the app helpful and commented on Facebook. “I just wanted to write and say thanks for the benefits app. I went thru it, made a claim for five service connected conditions, three were granted immediately. I probably wouldn’t have even made the claim if it weren’t for your app.” A fourth condition was granted later for Concklin and while one condition was denied, Concklin was pleased he filed a claim.

The app directs users to a logic based questionnaire that assists in verifying whether a veteran should file a claim for service-connected disability benefits or nonservice-connected disability pension. The survey addresses all possible disabilities covered by VA regulations.

Created in both English and Spanish, the app functions as a comprehensive logic tree, generating additional questions from previously supplied answers. To protect privacy, no data or personally identifiable information is retained. Once the questionnaire is completed, results can be emailed or printed and used as a reference when filing claims for VA benefits.

“We’re hoping to maximize the benefit of this app for veterans by offering it as a free service, without any cost for downloading and utilizing,” said Bart Stichman, co-founder and executive director of NVLSP. “We want to provide a supplementary means for veterans to decide what their best options are in filing a claim for disability benefits.”

NVLSP’s VA Benefit Identifier app does not assist with claims for a higher rating for disabilities the VA has already connected to military service; claims previously filed with the VA; or claims for disabilities resulting from VA health care, VA vocational rehabilitation or participation in a VA Compensated Work Therapy program.

In completing the Identifier questionnaire, veterans should have documents available about their military service (DD Form 214), information about medical conditions and any prior VA decisions or related communications.

Upon completing  the survey, veterans are advised to schedule an appointment with a veteran’s advocate chosen from a list of Veterans Service Organizations furnished in the app. Veteran’s advocates are regularly available to assist with applications for VA disability benefits, free of charge.

A key highlight of the NVLSP VA Benefit Identifier is its ability to appropriately recommend when veterans should file for specific conditions, prompting them to submit an “intent to file” form with the VA, while further providing timelines and instruction on how to proceed with a formal claim.

NVLSP’s app features an easy to navigate interface allowing veterans to interact with a support point person, and can be downloaded from the NVLSP website to any web-enabled smart device. NVLSP recently fixed some bugs in the app in May that had frustrated a handful of users, and the problems identified were corrected.

Download the NVLSP VA Benefit Identifier app on NVLSP’s website, from the Apple App Store, or from the Google Play Store.

About NVLSP
The National Veterans Legal Services Program (NVLSP) is an independent, nonprofit veterans service organization that has served active duty military personnel and veterans since 1980. NVLSP strives to ensure that our nation honors its commitment to its 22 million veterans and active duty personnel by ensuring they have the federal benefits they have earned through their service to our country. NVSLP offers training for attorneys and other advocates; connects veterans and active duty personnel with pro bono legal help when seeking disability benefits; publishes the nation’s definitive guide on veteran benefits; and represents and litigates for veterans and their families before the VA, military discharge review agencies and federal courts. For more information go to www.nvlsp.org.

Yes I Can—Program and Book Discovered by a Veteran, for Veterans

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Ray Simmons' Yes I Can Book

Yes I Can’s Guide to Better Living for Veterans

My name is Ray Simmons, and I am the President and Founder of Yes I Can, a non- profit organization. I wrote the book “A Guide to Better Living for Veterans” hoping it will transform the lives of Veterans in a positive way.

It was Joe Gallant, a Vietnam Veteran that inspired me to write this guide. He shared some stories with me about how many Veterans return home after fighting for our country, feeling unappreciated for all the sacrifices they’ve made for this country. Not to mention, our Veterans are committing suicide at such a high rate. This guide touches on several different subjects such as; Negative Attitude, Positive Attitude, Self Esteem, Motivation, Goals, Persistence, Patience, Procrastination, Art of Listening, and Communication. We included these subjects in our guide hoping it will change the psyche of our Veterans; generate values that are practical, meaningful and supportive of a healthy, vital lifestyle.

My goal is to make sure that every Veteran receives a Guide for Better Living as a gift from us, the Citizens of America whose freedom they fought to protect. I’m asking you to please help me put a guide in each Veterans hand. You can help a Veteran that you know by purchasing a Guide for him or her. If you don’t happen to know a Veteran you can still donate a guide to one. Did you know that there are 892,221 veterans in New York State? If each one of our Veterans were afforded the chance to receive a guide, it will be a life changing experience for a low cost of $13.90!

If you would like to learn more about Yes I Can or purchase a guide, you can visit our website at YesICanvets.com or if you would like to assist us in anyway to fulfill our goals in providing a guide to our Veterans, feel free to call our offices toll free number 1-888-612-3893 or 914-497-5509. All donations are tax deductible!!!!!

Thank you for giving me the wonderful opportunity to share a few valuable lessons that I have learned in my lifetime. The main purpose of this book is to help our Veterans change their perspective from negative to positive. I also want to heighten there self –esteem. For example, if it is low, this guide will give them the motivation that is necessary to reach any goal in life!

-Ray Simmons, Author of Yes I Can: A Guide to Better Living For Veterans.

In addition to our guide for better living, we offer a 8-week life changing program:

About the Program:
Purpose of Program: The purpose of the program is to bring a successful mind set to our CAN DO format. We will generate values that are practical, meaningful and supportive of a healthy, vital lifestyle for our participants.

Duration of Program: The program is delivered through workshops twice a week for one hour a day over the course of eight weeks.

Purpose of Subjects: The workshop is made up of ten subjects that will change the psyche of our Veterans. Below is a brief synopsis of each subject’s purpose.

The first subject is Negative Attitude. The goal of this subject is for participants to identify where negativity comes from. Throughout the workshop, we point out how negativity is habit forming, just like drugs, alcohol, and food. In addition, we show how negativity can affect your health, even shorten your life. As a result, it will help our participants rid negative habit(s), if they possess one.

The second subject is Positive Attitude. This subject points out the benefits of having a positive attitude.  Throughout the workshop, we show the participants how having a positive attitude can keep them healthy, help them to live longer, as well as prevent diseases.

The third subject is Self Esteem.  Throughout the workshop the participants will gain an understanding that having a high positive self -esteem is extremely essential for a happy and fulfilling life and they are what they think they are. This subject will help them to think highly of themselves. As a result, the participants will have high positive selves esteem and love to appreciate themselves. Also, realize how special they are.

The fourth subject is Motivation. This subject will help the participants identify what motivates their thoughts and actions. They will understand that their thoughts and actions create their realities. As a result, they will be aware of what motivates them so their realities will be what they desire them to be.

The fifth subject is Goals. This subject teaches the participants how to set goals and fulfill their goals in life.  They will learn that life means to have purpose and goals. On the contrary, death means to do nothing and go nowhere. As a result, this subject will motivate the participants to soar to heights that they didn’t know they could reach.

The sixth subject is Persistence. This subject teaches the participants how to continue to pursue goals when faced with opposition. They will learn how to endure the storm of disappointments no matter how many times the door of rejection closes. As a result, they will know that a winner never quits, and a quitter never wins.

The seventh subject is Patience. This subject teaches the participants how to calmly tolerate delay. They will start to realize anything worth having is worth waiting for. As a result, they will become wise enough to know that there is a time for everything and you can get where you need to be if you just be patient.

The eighth subject is Procrastination. This subject teaches the participants the value of getting the job done today and not waiting for tomorrow. The goal is to help the participants realize that every minute that passes, is a minute that they’ve missed an opportunity. In addition, they are taught how to manage their time so that they will learn to appreciate time and its value.

The ninth subject is the Art of Listening. This subject teaches the participants how to be an empathetic listener. Throughout this workshop, they will learn the art of listening to understand, opposed to listening to reply. In addition, we point out how important it is for someone to know that you truly understand his or her problem. As a result, the participants will listen to understand.

The tenth subject is Communication. This subject teaches the participants that communication is the most important skill in life. They will learn how to read body language because sixty percent of a message is told by the body not the words.

Get the details about the program and order your copy of the book today at yesicanvets.com

Breakthrough Therapy for PTSD

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Army man sitting

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have hailed methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) a breakthrough treatment for people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). MDMA, also known as ecstasy, is a synthetic drug that alters mood and perception.

After years of research, the medical uses of MDMA have officially been recognized by the U.S. government, with the FDA granting therapists the right to treat PTSD patients with the drug.

Forbes.com reports: MAPS, which has been championing and fundraising for MDMA research for roughly 30 years, explained in a press release that the FDA’s granting of a Breakthrough Therapy Designation indicates the agency “has agreed that this treatment may have a meaningful advantage and greater compliance over available medications for PTSD.” It also designates the agency’s intent to help develop and review the treatment faster than other candidate therapies.

According to MAPS, the nonprofit organization has reached an agreement with the FDA under the Special Protocol Assessment Process for the design of two Phase 3 trials for MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for patients with severe PTSD in the near future.

“Reaching agreement with [the] FDA on the design of our Phase 3PTSD Therapyprogram and having the ability to work closely with the agency has been a major priority for our team,” said Amy Emerson, executive director of the MAPS Public Benefit Corporation, in a release. “Our Phase 2 data was extremely promising with a large effect size, and we are ready to move forward quickly. With breakthrough designation, we can now move even more efficiently through the development process in collaboration with the FDA to complete Phase 3.”

The drug’s ability to help people with PTSD cope with the lingering effects of trauma is attributed in large part to its capacity to produce feelings of euphoria, empathy, and heightened emotional and physical sensations – in other words, perhaps, giving sorely stressed brains the kind of neurochemical getaway that begets a little peace of mind. Those effects also seem to motivate recreational users, but unlike the self-dosed Saturday night version, official MDMA-assisted psychotherapy involves three administrations of the drug combined with established psychotherapeutic techniques.

Rick Doblin, founder and executive director of MAPS, commented in a statement, “For the first time ever, psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy will be evaluated in Phase 3 trials for possible prescription use, with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD leading the way. Now that we have agreement with FDA, we are ready to start negotiations with the European Medicines Agency.”

In Phase 2 trials completed by MAPS, 61 percent of the 107 participants no longer qualified for PTSD two months after they underwent three sessions of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, according to the group. After a year, that number grew to 68 percent, and among participants who had all suffered from chronic, treatment-resistant PTSD, on average for 17.8 years.

The randomized, placebo-controlled Phase 3 trials will assess the efficacy and safety of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy in a group of 200 to 300 participants with PTSD aged 18+ at sites in the U.S., Canada, and Israel. As Science reported, the trials could begin as soon as next spring and wrap up by 2021 if MAPS is able to find the estimated $25 million needed to conduct them.

As Science reflected, “That an illegal dancefloor drug could become a promising pharmaceutical is another indication that the efforts of a dedicated group of researchers interested in the medicinal properties of mind-altering drugs is paying dividends.”

David Nutt, a neuropsychopharmacologist at Imperial College London, told Science, “This is not a big scientific step. It’s been obvious for 40 years that these drugs are medicines. But it’s a huge step in acceptance.”

Source: maps.org

PTSD at Work: How Managers Can Help

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Woman with PTSD

By Jordan Brewer, Talent Acquisition Manager and Veteran Liaison at Aveanna Healthcare

Every workplace has its own stressors—from deadlines to workload and everything in between. But when you combine the stress of the daily grind with the chronic anxiety of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a simple “day at the office” can seem like anything but.

Such is the struggle faced by the millions of veterans with PTSD. As they transition into civilian life—a world of résumés, interviews and deadlines—they’re still shouldering the anxiety of their worst, most grueling days in service. How can we help them?

For starters, we have to meet them where they are: As a recruiter at Aveanna Healthcare, a pediatric home care company that made it its mission to hire veterans (and as a five-year Navy vet myself), I’ve learned that PTSD comes in all shapes and sizes. Not every service member has it, and of those who do, not everyone expresses it the same way.

For example, PTSD can range from an occasional forgetfulness to something more intense, like anger, and it affects those who saw combat along with those who didn’t. Some people experience it for a short while after service, while others have the anxiety follow them for years to come. And not everybody who has it knows they do.

But regardless of the traits and duration of an employee’s PTSD, there are a few things every manager and co-worker can do to help:

  1. Learn to spot the signs. I always tell people that PTSD isn’t what you see in the movies. There may not be some huge outburst or war flashback. Sometimes, the signs may be subtler, like if someone forgets little things or has trouble concentrating. Another indicator might be if they interact with colleagues differently—being more terse or withdrawn in a gradual or sudden fashion.
  2. Communicate. Employees may just need someone to listen—or they may not. But never let someone struggle in silence without at least asking if you can help. However, you also have to know when to walk away. Everyone manages stress differently, and like war, some battles just take time to work through.
  3. Embrace flexibility. I’ve seen veterans do best when their managers accommodate their needs in creative and flexible ways, as opposed to asking everyone to meet some uniform policy. Rearrange their schedule so they can miss the anxiety-ridden morning traffic jam, allow them to take frequent breaks during the day to recharge, or give the option to telecommute once a week. Ask them what works best for them, and go from there.
  4. Consider workspace design. See if you can change anything about the employee’s physical workspace to meet their needs. For example, if they feel anxious when startled, place their desk facing the door so that they can see as people approach, rather than being surprised from behind. If crowds or noise trigger them, consider placing them in a quiet spot instead of areas with high foot traffic, like near the elevators or break room.
  5. Engage and train HR. At Aveanna, we hire for about 180 locations—but as a recruiter, my job isn’t just to fill one opening and then move on to the next one. Rather, recruiters should be involved at every step of that person’s employment over the long haul. As challenges arise that could be attributed to PTSD, such as employee-to-employee conflict or performance issues, it’s important to have a human resource staff trained to help job candidates through the process with compassion and understanding.
  6. Create a resource list. When I tell veterans about the multitude of free resources they have available to them from nonprofits, licensed therapists and other local groups, they’re amazed. That’s why it’s integral to build up a resource list and a strong referral base to send employees when they need help.

No two veterans are the same—so PTSD will never be a one-size-fits-all issue. But with a little compassion and genuine flexibility, we can help veterans feel included, welcome and heard in the workplace.

One Company Gives Back to Injured Veterans, Helping them Every Step of the Way

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Leslie Smith

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, there are 18.5 million veterans in the country. Like the rest of the population, they experience lower leg injuries, resulting from any number of issues.

One company has created a way to help them every step of the way, making it more comfortable for them to have better mobility as they recover. The iWALKFree company gives back to veterans, by giving those with lower leg injuries the iWALK2.0.

“We are extremely grateful for everything veterans have done for our country,” explains Brad Hunter, the innovator of iWALK2.0 and the chief executive officer of the company, iWALKFree, Inc. “Being able to give back and help them even a little is the least that we can do. We are happy to know that our device helps make their injury recovery a lot more tolerable.”

The iWALK2.0 has been designed to help with all types of common lower leg injuries, as well as those with amputations. To provide veterans with the iWALK2.0, the company has teamed up with the Travis Mills Foundation. The foundation was created by Retired U.S. Army Staff Sergeant Travis Mills, who is a wounded warrior, having lost of his arms and legs during combat. He became an advocate for veterans and amputees, starting the foundation to help with those efforts. During 2017, they helped 84 veteran families with being able to attend a healing retreat that included such as activities as yoga, archery, boating, fishing, hiking, painting, culinary arts, and much more.

One of the wounded veterans helped by the iWALK2.0 is Leslie Smith, a veteran of the U.S. Army who served in Bosnia in 2001-2002. Her rigorous training required her to wear combat boots that lead to a blood clot. The condition led to an amputation of her left leg. Though she was fitted for a prosthetic leg, what many people don’t realize is that wearing them for any length of time can lead to severe skin irritation and extreme pain at the knee and upper thigh. Typically amputees give up their prosthetics from time to time so that these side effects can heal.  And many military vets who have lost their legs have given up on prosthetics altogether due to these side effects. The iWALK2.0 helps her through those healing periods.

“The iWalk allows me to be and feel like a whole person,” explains Leslie SmithLeslie Smith. ““The iWalk gives me freedom, confidence, and independence. I do not have to rely on a wheelchair or crutches. Having the ability to use my hands freely is of great importance especially being legally blind and having a service dog. The iWalk has removed any and all stress or worry that I will not be able to continue daily activities, work, travel, and anything fun, like shopping. I have no fear of missing out on what I need to do!”

With the iWALK2.0, Smith no longer has to hop, crawl, use a wheelchair or crutches, in order to get around when she was taking a break from her prosthetic to heal. This helps to avoid injuries, bruising, falls, and soreness.  Plus, it’s empowered her life because she can get around with ease and feel safe doing so.

The program that iWALKFree has in place to give back to those in need provides people with the opportunity to donate their used iWALK2.0 to a variety of charities. Along with the Travis Mills Foundation, they provide devices to the Adaptive Training Foundation, Canada Africa Community Health Alliance, Serving Us Veterans in Need, Globus Relief, Hands of Hope, Physicians for Peace, Limbs for Life, World Rehabilitation Fund, Marshall-Legacy Institute, and Volunteers for Inter-American Development Assistance.

In addition to giving back to veterans to help with their injury recovery, the company also provides help to other charities where they provide free iWALK2.0 units to those in need who do not have the means to otherwise pay for them. The device retails for $149, but their mission with that charity is to help those in need have access to a more comfortable way to recover from injury that will also help them be more mobile.

The product does provide benefits to those veterans who used it, because the iWALK2.0 offered them easier mobility while they were recovering from an injury. Rather than them spending their time recovering from a lower leg injury using crutches, which can be painful and limit mobility, they were able to get around easier and with less pain.

The iWALK2.0 is hands-free, pain-free alternative to using crutches and leg scooters.  It’s easy to learn to use, intuitive, and safe. From the knee up, the leg is doing the same walking motion that comes naturally to it. The device is essentially a temporary lower leg, which gives people their independence and mobility back as they recover from an injury. The device is pain-free, and makes it possible for people to engage in many of their normal routine activities, such as walking the dog, grocery shopping, and walking up or down stairs.

Clinical research, the results of which are on the company website, shows that patients using the iWALK2.0 heal faster, and have a higher sense of satisfaction and a higher rate of compliance. The iWALK2.0 sells for $149 and is available online and through select retailers. Some insurance companies may cover the cost of the device. The device can be used with a cast or boot, and comes with a limited warranty. For more information on the iWALK2.0, visit the site at: iwalk-free.com. To see a video of the iWALK2.0 in action, visit: iWalkFree.com.

About iWALKFree

The iWALK2.0 is a hands-free knee crutch, made by iWALKFree, Inc.  It’s a mobility device used instead of traditional crutches and knee scooters. It offers more comfort and independence, with the hands and arms remaining free. The device offers people a functional and independent lifestyle as they are recovering from many common lower leg injuries. For more information on the iWALK2.0, visit the site at: iwalk-free.com.

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Source:
U.S. Census Bureau Veterans Day 2017.

Paws of War to Take Therapy Dogs to Nursing Home

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Therapy Dog

Dogs can often brighten the day of anyone, providing them with companionship, laughs, and giving them a reason to smile. The senior residents at the Dominican Village Assisted Living Community, located at 565 Albany Avenue in Amityville, New York, will be all smiles on June 15, 2018 from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. That’s because the Paws of War organization will be stopping by with seven therapy dogs to visit with the residents, many of whom are veterans and retired police officers.

“This is going to be a real treat for the residents of Dominican Village,” says Joanne Contegiacomo, director of the dog therapy program at Paws of War. “Many of these heroes we will be visiting are humble, yet have saved many lives. We want them to know their courage and valor has not been forgotten.”

Paws of War is an organization that focuses on serving veterans, law enforcement, and first responders. Some of the seniors that the therapy dogs visit are suffering from such conditions as dementia, while others are in good health. Numerous of the veterans that will be visited have been awarded Purple Hearts. Everyone typically gets something beneficial from the time they spend with the dogs. Paws of War is also partnering with the Fraternal Order of Police (FOP) New York lodge 911 to provide this beneficial service to the assisted living community. The FOP will also have therapy dogs at the event.

Therapy DogThe purpose of the visits is to provide the residents with an opportunity to connect with the dogs, have their spirits lifted, and to benefit from the calming, soothing nature that they bring with them. According to the National Institutes of Health, interacting with animals has been shown to decrease stress-related hormones and lower blood pressure. Other studies have shown that interactions help to reduce loneliness, boost your mood, and provide feelings of social support.

“Being able to take our dogs there to spend an hour is exciting,” added Joanne Contegiacomo, director of the dog therapy program at Paws of War. “It’s our mission to help and give back when and where we can, and we know this is going to help lift some spirits.”

Paws of War is an non profit organization that provides assistance to military members and their pets, and provides service and service dogs to veterans suffering from PTSD. To learn more about Paws of War or make a donation to support their efforts, visit their site at:pawsofwar.org

Therapy DogAbout Paws of War
Paws of War is a 501c3 organization devoted to helping both animals and veterans. The Paws of War goal is to train and place shelter dogs to serve and provide independence to our United States military veterans that suffer from the emotional effects of war such as PTSD. In turn each veteran can experience the therapeutic and unconditional love only a companion animal can bring. To learn more about Paws of War, visit the site at pawsofwar.org