Capt. Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger’s Life of Service Started with Dad, Military

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By Brady Rhoades

When you think of Chesley Sullenberger, III—Capt. Sully or just plain Sully to the public—his improbable landing of an engines-dead US Airways airplane on the Hudson River comes to mind.

Perhaps you picture 155 survivors getting hoisted to safety off the wings of Flight 1549.

The word “hero” is bandied about—an ice-in-his-veins, former fighter pilot in the U.S. military saving the day.

And then Capt. Sully states: “It took me 40 years to become an overnight success. All my life, I was preparing myself for some kind of challenge.”

Legend, meet reality.

And, you know what? Reality surpasses legend.

Because it took decades of education, toil, training, more learning, more work, and more practice for Capt. Sully to help save all those lives and pull off what’s known as the “Miracle on the Hudson.”

It also took humility. Few remember that Capt. Sully was the last one off the plane.

“As soon as we landed, I knew my responsibilities were not over,” he said. “Four hours later, I learned that everyone had been saved. Only then were my professional obligations fulfilled.”

Capt. Sully, who speaks in the measured, modest tone of a seasoned veteran, said the Miracle on the Hudson was a team effort.

“I think the fact that this group of people—first responders, crew, passengers—all felt the same common humanity and rose to the occasion, that is the essential lesson here, a hopeful one.”

During speeches, Capt. Sully emphasizes teamwork, and often singles out co-pilot Jeff Skiles.

On January 15, 2009, Capt. Sully, a former fighter pilot for the U.S. Air Force, took off from LaGuardia Airport. Minutes into the flight, the plane struck a gaggle of geese northeast of the George Washington Bridge. All engine power was lost, leaving Flight 1549 powerless.

Technically.

All this occurred at about 2,800 feet and 4.5 miles from LaGuardia. Passengers and crew heard loud bangs and saw flames from the engines, followed by silence and the stench of fuel.

Realizing that both engines had shut down, Capt. Sully took control while Skiles worked a checklist for engine restart.

What was Capt. Sully’s first task? Calming his mind and body, which, naturally, had been thrust into full alarm. This had to be tended to so that he could make sound decisions and physically finesse the plane to safety.

How does one get a racing mind and pounding heart under control?

The pilot’s military training kicked in, for one. It took him about five seconds to gather himself and lock into the nerve-wracking responsibility at hand, he said.

All that preparation had paid off.

Capt. Sully had precious little time to make a life-or-death decision. Namely, to go back to LaGuardia or …

He decided to land on the icy Hudson.

His famous words to the crew and passengers: “Brace for impact.”

And then the so-called miracle happened. But it wasn’t a miracle. It was the result of Sully’s training and leadership, and of the dedication and teamwork of the crew and passengers. It was a testament to the old saying, “The harder you work, the luckier you get.”

The country—suffering through war and economic hardship—cheered. Viewers stayed glued to their TV sets as reams of passengers, standing on the wings of the bobbing plane, were helped to safety.

Precisely when we needed it, we had a hero.

Sully receives award
Air Force Academy Superintendent Lt. Gen. John F. Regni presents the 2009 Col. James Jabara award to 1973 graduate and classmate Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger during a parade held in his honor April 15. Assisting is William “T” Thompson, chief executive officer for the Association of Graduates

Chesley Sullenberger, III was born in Denison, Texas, on January 23, 1951.

As a boy, he watched planes fly across the seemingly-endless southern sky; he was fascinated.

A passion for flying, and a commitment to leadership and safety, took root early on.

He learned from his father—a World War II veteran—“to do what veterans do. To serve.”

Sully Air Force
Former airline pilot, Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger III, puts on his G-suit before his flight with the United States Air Force Thunderbirds at Travis Air Force Base in May.

Sullenberger continues to support the military and veterans’ causes.

“A tiny fraction of our population is doing the heavy lifting,” he said. “They’re choosing to serve, to delay their own gratification, to put themselves at risk, to do for others what they cannot and will not do for themselves. That selfless act needs to be cherished… And not just with thank you’s in airports.”

Cherishing our military men and women means equipping them properly, he said, and helping those who return from duty with ailments.

”It’s a national disgrace that the rate of suicide among veterans is so high. We need to do a better job.”

Sullenberger enrolled in the U.S. Air Force Academy in 1969, and graduated as an officer in 1973 with a bachelor of science degree. He also holds master’s degrees from Purdue University and the University of Northern Colorado.

Sullenberger served as a fighter pilot for the U.S. Air Force from 1973 to 1980, flying Vietnam-era F-4 Phantom II jets. He was a flight leader and a training officer and attained the rank of captain while building up experience overseas and at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada.

An elite pilot, Sullenberger was the mission commander for Red Flag exercises, in which pilots receive advanced aerial combat training. He was also a member of an aircraft accident investigation board.

In 1980, Sullenberger joined Pacific Southwest Airlines as a commercial pilot (Pacific Southwest was acquired in 1988 by what would become US Airways). Over his years as a professional pilot, he was an instructor, as well as an Air Line Pilots Association safety chairman and accident investigator.

About a year after the Hudson landing, Capt. Sully retired.

He now concentrates on running his safety consulting business, Safety Reliability Methods, Inc., which was founded in 2007 and focuses on management, safety, and performance.

He has helped develop new protocols for airline safety, and served as the co-chairman, along with Skiles, of the EAA’s Young Eagles youth introduction-to-aviation program from 2009 to 2013.

In 2009, HarperCollins published Capt. Sully’s memoir, Highest Duty: My Search for What Really Matters. In 2012, he published “Making a Difference: Stories of Vision and Courage From America’s Leaders.”

In 2011, he became a CBS News contributor as the network’s Aviation and Safety Expert, a role which he holds today.

He also serves on the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Advisory Committee for Automation in Transportation.

Much of his time is spent speaking in the United States and abroad about flight safety issues.

He’s delivered more than 200 keynote addresses to date, and often speaks for large corporations such as Dupont, Chevron, and AT&T, specializing in topics such as leadership, crisis management, and overcoming obstacles.

Sully, a movie about Capt. Sully, directed by Clint Eastwood and starring Tom Hanks in the title role, was released in September 2016.

That’s another thing. When you say “Sully,” millions of people think of Tom Hanks, who said he was honored to portray Capt. Sully.

It’s worth noting that at the time of the Hudson landing, Capt. Sully was a 57-year-old pilot who’d sustained a pay cut because airlines’ revenues were slowing and, some argue, pilots were under-valued.

These days, Capt. Sully’s life is

Tom Hanks, Chesley Sullenberger and Aaron Eckhart
(left to right) Tom Hanks, Chesley Sullenberger and Aaron Eckhart attending a special screening of
Sully at the BFI IMAX in London.

about what he learned long ago, from his father and from his military commanders: service. Hard work. Discipline. Values. Believing in a better world, a better future.

That means lobbying for pilots. It means pushing for greater safety measures in an industry that’s already pretty darn safe. That’s a through-line throughout Capt. Sully’s life of service: safety. Trust in our institutions. Touchstones in this grand experiment called America.

“My military training and service, especially the flight training, helped me to really realize the importance of adhering to core values and having the discipline to approach every job I’ve had with a professional attitude,” Capt. Sully said. “The discipline of the military helped me to have a discipline. Not just think of a job but a calling… Our society at large really needs people with these core values.”

That’s why veterans are worthy of hiring, in a variety of fields.

“They are a valuable resource and it’s a national treasure to have people with those skills and attitudes,” Capt Sully said.

He knows, because he’s one of them.

And it doesn’t matter if you call them miracle-makers or simply state that they’re prepared.

The results are in: Veterans make our world safer, better.

11 Free Programs To Help Veterans Succeed As Entrepreneurs

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two men shaking hands, one of them is in a suit, the other is in military uniform

Veteran-owned businesses are an important engine of economic growth. New research from Experian has found that veterans tend to own and operate business with a larger employee base, and veteran-owned businesses have better longevity and sustainability than non veteran-owned business. (Experian analyzed and compared the credit data of veteran-owned businesses and non-veteran-owned businesses from 2015 through July 2019.)

Nearly 25% of veterans express interest in starting a business. That’s the good news. The bad news is entrepreneurship among younger veterans is on the decline. A report by Bunker Labs suggests one way to foster veteran entrepreneurship is through an “ecosystem” approach: “Taking an ecosystem approach to facilitating entrepreneurship requires ensuring that there is relationship density, strong network effects, and connected resources for entrepreneurs.”

Fortunately, there are a growing number of free programs designed to help veteran entrepreneurs tap into ecosystems that can help them thrive. Here are 11 of these programs:

1. Boots to Business

Boots to Business (B2B) is an entrepreneurial education and training program offered by the Small Business Administration (SBA) as part of the Department of Defense Transition Assistance Program (TAP). The course provides an overview of entrepreneurship and applicable business ownership fundamentals. It begins with a two-day “Introduction to Entrepreneurship” course, and after completing that course, participants may further their study through the B2B Revenue Readiness online course, delivered through a partnership with Mississippi State University.

Who qualifies: Active duty service members (including National Guard and Reserve), veterans of all eras, and their spouses.

Learn more: Visit SBAvets.force.com. To register, contact the Transition Service Manager (TSM) on your military installation.

2. Reboot

This one or two day in-person course is offered off installation and provides participants with an overview of business fundamentals, while introducing techniques for evaluating the feasibility of business concepts. The course covers a range of entrepreneurial business concepts and provides resources for accessing startup capital, contracting opportunities, and more.

Who qualifies: Veterans of all eras, including National Guard and Reserve members, and spouses.

Learn more: Review the class schedule and register at SBAvets.force.com.

3. VETRN

VETRN trains veteran small business owners and family members, free of charge, on how to successfully grow their own small businesses. This executive MBA program is based on the award-winning “StreetWise MBA,” which is taught in over 70 cities across the United States. VETRN has an exclusive contract to teach this management training program to veteran cohorts. Veterans accepted into the program receive a mentor on Day One and have access to a substantial professional resource network.

Who qualifies: In order to be accepted into the VETRN program, veteran small business owners must have been in business for one or more years, have at least one employee, and have annual revenues of $75,000 or greater.

Learn more: Visit Vetrn.org 

4. VetFran

One out of seven franchise businesses is owned and operated by veterans of the U.S. military. VetFran is a strategic initiative of the International Franchise Association (IFA) and includes over 600 IFA member companies that offer financial incentives, education, and support to veterans interested in franchise ownership and/or a career path in franchising. Navy Federal Credit Union is one such partner, providing startup capital for veterans who are buying franchises, as well as additional capital for franchise expansion.

Who qualifies: Veterans and their family members can use the extensive toolkit on the VetFran website to explore franchising, learn about discounts, and find franchise opportunities.

Learn more: Visit VetFran.org.

5. Veteran Business Outreach Centers (VBOCs)

In partnership with the SBA, the Veterans Business Outreach Center (VBOC) Program is designed to provide entrepreneurial development services, such as business training, counseling, and resource partner referrals. Services include pre-business plan workshops, concept assessments, business plan preparation, entrepreneurial training, mentorships, and more. There are 22 organizations participating in this cooperative agreement and serving as VBOCs.

Who qualifies: Transitioning service members, veterans, National Guard and Reserve members, and military spouses interested in starting or growing a small business.

Learn more: Visit the VBOC webpage on the SBA website.

Other Articles From AllBusiness.com:

6. Veteran Institute for Procurement

This program provides veteran-owned business executives with comprehensive instruction on how to accelerate their federal government contracting business skills. It offers three programs for veteran-owned small businesses:

  • VIP START—For businesses that want to do business with the federal government.
  • VIP GROW—For businesses that want to increase their federal government contracting opportunities.
  • VIP INTERNATIONAL—For businesses that want to enter and/or expand their contracting opportunities overseas.

The three-day, in-residence training is offered at no cost to participants (other than travel to the event).

Who qualifies: Service-disabled veteran-owned small businesses and veteran-owned small businesses.

Learn more: Veteran Institute for Procurement

7. Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans (EBV)

The Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans (EBV) offers small business management training programs for post-9/11 veterans and their family members. It includes three programs:

  • EBV—Designed for businesses in the early-growth stage; includes an online course, a 9-day residency program, and a year of mentorship and support.
  • EBV-F—Offers entrepreneurship training with a focus on family issues, caregiver issues, and work-life balance issues related to being a business owner.
  • EBV Accelerate—For veterans who run successful businesses; provides tools and coaching to help take a business to the next level.

There is no cost to participate in these programs; however, EBV Accelerate participants must cover travel costs to the residency program.

Who qualifies: EBV applicants must have separated from service after 2001 and have a service-connected disability. EBV-F is available to family members of qualified veterans, including members of the National Guard and Reserve. EBV Accelerate is available to qualified veteran-owned businesses at least three years old with five or more full-time employees. (See full conditions for each program on website.)

Learn more: Learn about all three programs at the EBV website.

8. Bunker Labs

Bunker Labs is a 501(c)(3) non-profit, a national network of veteran and military spouse entrepreneurs dedicated to helping the veteran community start and grow businesses. Programs include:

  • Launch Lab Online—An online gamified, interactive way to get an entrepreneurship education; can be accessed from anywhere in the world.
  • Veterans in Residence—Provides space, services, business mentorship, and community for veteran entrepreneurs and military family members who are entrepreneurs; currently available in 17 cities.
  • CEOcircle—A mastermind group of select CEOs who are military veterans or spouses, and whose companies are growing; group meets monthly.
  • Bunker Connect—A “part networking, part mentorship working session.” It brings together transitioning military, veterans and their spouses, and more than 65 resource partners. The program is slated to be available in 12 cities by mid-2020.
  • Muster Across America—An annual national tour to cities across the United States showcasing veteran entrepreneurs, empowering local entrepreneurial ecosystems, and building connections between veterans and the business community. Events include education, networking, and a pitch competition.

Who qualifies: Active duty military, veterans, and their families are welcome. CEOcircle is by invitation only, but applicants may submit an “interest submission” online.

Learn more: Visit BunkerLabs.org.

9. National Veterans Entrepreneurship Program (VEP)

National Veterans Entrepreneurship Program (VEP) is a comprehensive entrepreneurship training and support program for veterans with a service-connected disability. It includes a self-study portion, eight-day residency program in Oklahoma, Tennessee, or Florida, followed by five months of support and mentorship. All travel, accommodation, meals, materials, and instructional costs are covered by the VEP.

Who qualifies: Any veteran with a service-connected disability.

Learn more: VEP at Oklahoma State University, VEP at University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, and VEP at University of Florida.

10. Patriot Boot Camp (PBC)

Since 2012, Patriot Boot Camp (PBC), a national 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization, has been on a mission to create a community that advances and supports military members, veterans, and military spouses in their mission to become creators, innovators, and entrepreneurs leading the new economy. PBC’s core program is an intensive three-day technology entrepreneurship boot camp that culminates in a pitch practice and competition. Fun fact: Four alumni have appeared on ABC’s “Shark Tank.”

Who qualifies: Military members, veterans, and military spouses.

Learn more: PatriotBootCamp.org

11. Vets First Verification Program

The Vets First Verification Program provides verified firms owned and controlled by veterans and service-disabled veterans the opportunity to compete for VA set-asides. VA also trains and certifies Verification Assistance Counselors to provide application assistance to SDVOSBs/VOSBs that want to become verified. Free counseling services are available to veterans free of charge at Procurement Technical Assistance Centers throughout the country. Free webinars and extensive educational resources are also available online.

Who qualifies: Veteran-owned and service-disabled veteran-owned small businesses.

Learn more: Visit the Vets First Verification Program website.

RELATED: New Job Website Helps Veterans Transition to Civilian Life

This article was originally published on AllBusiness. See all articles by Gerri Detweiler.

Continue on to Forbes to read the complete article.

Veterans Are Finding Lasting Peace After Taking These Free Journeys into Nature for Months at a Time

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veteran on a hike looking out at the wilderness in the distance standing near a cliff

With countless US ex-service members struggling to readjust to civilian life following their deployment, more and more veterans are finding unparalleled success in alternative forms of rehabilitation and therapy.

Warrior Expeditions is a nonprofit that has proven nature to be an effective treatment for veterans suffering from PTSD. The organization helps veterans overcome their trauma by sending them on longterm nature excursions lasting two to six months.

The charity, which also provides all the gear and supplies necessary for the journeys, typically helps 30 to 40 veterans every year with about 10 different expeditions—all of which are facilitated at no cost to the vets.

The organization’s recently concluded 53-day trip through North Carolina is the first time that Warrior Expeditions has incorporated paddling, biking, and hiking into one of their excursions.

Marine Corps veteran Sean Gobin was inspired to launch the charity after he returned to the US in 2012 following several combat deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan. He then found peace and healing by hiking all 2,185 miles of the Appalachian Trail—and he knew that he wanted to share the experience with other veterans just like him.

There is no shortage of evidence on how spending time in nature can positively impact one’s physical and mental health. For the veterans participating in the Warrior Expedition outings, these therapeutic perks are also supplemented by the benefits of exercise, meditation, and sleeping outdoors.

Continue on to the Good News Network to read the complete article.

10 Skills to Master for a Successful Job Search

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man dressed in a suit with several other professionals in the background

As a service member, you’ve already got a strong skill set to make you an asset in the workplace. Many of those same skills can be applied in finding the right job in the first place.

Here are ten skills to master when searching and interviewing for a position:

  1. Flexibility—In today’s market, it’s important to show that you are willing to adjust your schedule or expectations to the demands of a job and compromise to get a task done.
  1. Technical literacy—These days, most jobs require some basic computer and tech knowledge. Knowing how to put together a spreadsheet or quick presentation will do wonders for your resume. If you feel like you need to bring your skills up to speed, explore learning opportunities around you—for example, courses at your community college, online training from MySECO and resources at the MWR Digital Library.
  1. Communication skills—It’s essential that you speak and write effectively in the workplace. Therefore, your communication during an interview is extremely important. Be prepared for questions, and most importantly, listen attentively to your interviewer.
  1. Multitasking abilities—Employers use keywords like “fast-paced” and “deadline-driven” because they are looking for employees who can multitask with ease. You’ll want to demonstrate to an employer that you can manage a variety of tasks at the same time, with limited supervision.
  1. Creativity—Even if the job you’re after is not in a creative field, remember that an employer wants to hire someone who offers a fresh perspective. The creative solution that you bring to a job could potentially expedite an employer’s process or improve a service offered, making you a more appealing potential hire.
  1. Problem-solving skills—Every company has problems that need to be solved, and that’s where an employee like you comes in. You’ll need to be able to analyze a problem and then use critical thinking to solve it. A fantastic way to highlight your skills during a job interview is to provide examples of problems you’ve effectively solved.

 

  1. Interpersonal abilities—Almost every job out there requires you to work with people so employers want to be sure that you can play nicely with others. During an interview, highlight your excellent teamwork skills, perhaps by relaying a time when you helped to alleviate a team conflict.

 

  1. Strong work ethic—Employers love employees who show up on time or even early. They appreciate those who are willing to go the extra mile. If you do excellent work and consider yourself productive, highlight that fact, especially if you have examples of times when you went above and beyond what was expected of you.
  1. Organizational skills—There’s simply no better time to demonstrate these skills than during a job interview. Come with extra copies of your resume, cover letter, job application, portfolio of past work and business cards. Be sure to proofread all your documents. Show up early and prepared with answers to common interview questions. Do a little research and come up with a few questions for your potential employer.
  1. Self-confidence—When it comes down to it, a job interview is an opportunity to sell yourself. Do whatever you need to do to boost your confidence and present yourself professionally: dress nicely and appropriately, be prompt, make eye contact, and be personable. The best way to make an employer believe in you is to believe in yourself.

As you search for a job, it’s crucial for you to identify your transferable skills, incorporate them into your resume, and highlight them in your job interview. As a service member, you have all the skills on this list and more. You just have to demonstrate those assets to a future employer.

Source: militaryonesource.mil

Stedman Graham: Lead Yourself First, Others Second

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Stedman Graham poses with several servicemembers outside in front of a large military plane

By Brady Rhoades

Once upon a time, Stedman Graham—yes, that Stedman—was a soldier in the United States Army, trying to figure out who he was and where he was going. More than 40 years later, he’s a world-renowned businessman, author and speaker with a laser focus on identity leadership.

“Understanding who you are is the key to your growth,” he told U.S. Veterans Magazine.

Five years in the Army in the 1970s gave him a solid foundation. “I would not be here today without the military,” he said. “I needed structure.”

Graham learned to be on time. To listen when others were speaking. To do his best. To not quit. To be a follower. To be a leader. To get down to the nitty-gritty details of whatever task he was working on.

“It helps you lay out a process for continual improvement,” the 68-year-old founder and CEO of S. Graham & Associates and bestselling author of 11 books said of his experience in the military.

Graham has never forgotten those lessons, and he is forever grateful. Which is why he continues to visit military bases and stay in touch with servicemen and women.

It’s also why he lobbies employers to hire veterans.

“The message of learning while you’re experiencing is a great message for our troops,” he said. “It’s a great design for self-actualization…You couldn’t have a better opportunity than serving.”

And, he added, you won’t get a more grounded, humble, flexible and

Graham’s latest book helps people identify themselves before taking the lead
Graham’s latest book helps people identify themselves before taking the lead

can-do employee than a veteran.

Graham was born on March 6, 1951, in the Whitesboro section of Middle Township, New Jersey, the son of Mary Jacobs Graham and Stedman Graham Sr. He is one of six children.

He received a bachelor’s degree in social work from Hardin-Simmons University in 1974, and a master’s degree in education from Ball State University in 1979. Graham, who stands at 6-foot-7, played basketball at Hardin-Simmons.

He later moved to High Point, North Carolina to establish himself in public relations. At B & C Associates, he worked on behalf of African-American causes and had many distinguished clients, including author Maya Angelou and South African activist Winnie Mandela.

He is also founder of Chicago, Illinois’s Athletes Against Drugs (AAD), a non-profit organization that provides services to youth and has awarded more than $1.5 million in scholarships since its founding in 1985. Moreover, the organization arranges for sports figures to educate children about substance abuse.

In 1988 Graham created S. Graham & Associates, a Chicago-based corporate and educational marketing and consulting firm.

Graham has delivered speeches at many public and private schools on the topics of identity and self-awareness. He is perhaps most famous as an author of business and self-help-related books, including, Who Are You? and his newly-released, Identity Leadership: To Lead Others You Must First Lead Yourself.

Graham has been partners with Oprah Winfrey since 1988.

Identity leadership employs a simple but profound premise: You can’t lead anybody until you lead yourself. And to lead yourself, you must know yourself. The “self” is the biggest enigma in the world, the more provocative challenge, and the most rewarding mountain to climb, according to Graham.

Stedman speaking to servicemembers
“It takes years to do simple. People think there is such a thing as an overnight success. There isn’t. Success is hard work. The success I am having today took me 25 years. You have to put the time in to get the rewards out.” —Stedman Graham

Graham talks about being a learner, a hard worker, and knowing who you are, but if you go deeper, he invokes what he calls the most important word in the English language.

“Love is the key word,” he said. “Passion, talent and skills are related. Do what you love.”

In Identity Leadership: To Lead Others You Must First Lead Yourself, readers learn how to define themselves. The alternative, Graham said, is that society “puts you in a box.”

“When you can’t define yourself, the world defines you by your race, by your house, by your car, your money or your title,” he said. “It’s kind of socially constructed and designed to control your development.”

Graham said once he figured out who he was, he began to lead himself and, “to create a vision beyond my circumstance.”

If love is the most paramount word, purpose might be second, or in the top five. “Everything starts with a purpose,” said Graham, adding that purpose is essential to self-actualization.

In his world travels, he is intensely interested in motivating people to get rid of labels—whether they are linked to race, gender, class, you name it—and to take control of their own destiny.

He wants others to realize the process for success is the same for everybody in the 24 hours we have in our days.

Graham says being able to teach that, and to help people realize their potential, is a passion and a joy. He advises his readers and listeners to not be afraid.

“Failure, in fact, is a phenomenal teacher,” Graham says. “The concept goes back to ‘learning while you’re experiencing.’”

He said veterans know what it’s like to be part of something bigger than themselves, and they’ve learned how to adapt, particularly when faced with adversity. But they aren’t superheroes. They could use a helping hand—be it by a prospective employer, a nurse, a clerk, or a citizen on the street.

“There’s so much work to be done as far as helping our troops,” Graham said. “I’m just honored to be of service.”

7 Steps to Finding a Job: Advice from a CEO

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close-up hand business man yping keyboard laptop

Finding a Job and getting employed is not rocket science. Just follow this advice from a CEO and you will get multiple invitations for interviews with the companies for which you apply.

I have been reading resumes for 46 years. I have hired hundreds of people. I have helped tens of thousands to get jobs. I focus entirely on assisting U.S. Veterans; however, this article will help any job seeker get a job faster.

Finding a way to support yourself and your family is not as difficult as it may seem, if you do it the right way. It is a multi-pronged offense and attack. You must use all of these tactics.

First: You must have confidence in yourself. You must believe that you can do the job you for which you are applying. The people who hire personnel have talked to thousands of applicants. They are very astute at reading people. You are probably not going to fool them. Do not apply for jobs that you are not qualified for and that you cannot do to the company’s complete satisfaction. It will not work out well for you or for them.

Second: Write a short, confident and intriguing cover letter, and include it with your resume. This is a brief summary of why you are the perfect candidate for their job opening. Make them want to read your resume. Include the title of the job and a few of the keywords the company has used in their job description.

Third: This is essential! When you send a resume to apply for a specific job, use the qualifications and experience listed in their job posting for reference when writing. Use their key descriptive words in your resume. (Ask yourself this question: When the person posted this job, which words in their job description did they choose as the “keywords” for their computer to look for to send them only qualified candidates. (Most resumes are read first by a computer that chooses resumes to be seen, based on their use of the keywords in the job description. The others are deleted.) Most companies do this now to save time. All that companies are looking for is a brief and honest response that proves that you meet their job guidelines, in order to fill their positions ASAP.
Too many, in fact, most applicants, send in a general resume. They have not included any of the information that the company needs to decide about whether they are qualified. They have not responded specifically to any of the list of qualifications and experience included in the job description. And they have not added any of the keywords listed in their employment ad. You will not be hired if you do the same. You will be like all the other frustrated job seekers.

*Note: do not apply for jobs using the same resume! The best way to conquer your objective is to use a bullet, not a shotgun. Snipers are sent for specific objectives. “Street-Sweepers” are for crowds. Hence, when applying for specific jobs, use a bullet to bring down your objective.

Fourth: If you were in the U.S. Military, do not make a long list of what you did in the DoD, without explaining how that makes you qualified for their open position. (Saying that you were an 0311 Infantry Rifleman will not get you any jobs. Such descriptions cannot be understood or translated by civilians. Perhaps if you said “0311 Infantry: Trained to use various sophisticated equipment and electronics in multiple situations as needed. Experienced in communications and in filling reports. Trained to assume leadership immediately when necessary. …”  (Note*: Most first readers of your resume will be non-veterans and be in their early 20s. They will not be the decision maker. They are probably not a US veteran and cannot make any sense of what your military responsibilities were and how they relate to the job they need to fill, unless you explain it in words they understand and can apply to the job they must fill.)

Fifth: Use LinkedIn. This is the Number One worldwide space for companies, employers, employees, and serious job seekers. Create a profile. Fill it out completely. Join 50 relevant groups. Follow some of the leaders in your industry and join some of the groups to which they belong. Follow companies for which you want to work. Connect with executives and employees in those companies. (Use the Search bar to do all this.) Read the posts that they make, like them and make a comment. Also, write and post articles and send them to your groups. Make your self known. Build relationships.

The connections you make on LinkedIn can be extremely valuable in putting you on the top of the list of candidates a company will consider. If you can get a recommendation from an executive or an employee of a company, it helps tremendously.

LinkedIn is also an online space that virtually every recruiter in the world has joined and uses to find job seekers to fill every job opening they acquire.

Take the time to watch all the videos that LinkedIn offers for job seekers. (Click Here.)

Sixth: Use niche job boards. Look for job boards that are exclusive for your experience and industry. If you are a US veteran, go to sites like HirePatriots.com. Post your resume and search for the jobs and the state or city in which you want to find employment. If you find a job you know you can do well, give them a call. HirePatriots will act as your agent and contact the company and recommend you. – There are such niche job boards for every industry. The BIG job boards are becoming obsolete. They are too expensive and less effective for employers to use. And for job seekers, it is like trying to find a needle in a haystack!

Seventh: For those of you that are not shy, here is a sensational way to get seen and noticed: Your local media wants stories about US veterans. They also want a US veteran that can explain what it is like to be in the military, what is learned and gained by being in the US military, and why it is so hard for our military to transition. Write the producer, editor, station manager and some of their reporters. Send a short letter letting them know that you are a U.S. veteran and that you would like to talk on these subjects and educate their listeners. You will get interviews! The News runs out of things to say every 24 hours. By offering them to speak about U.S. veteran issues, you help them fill their News time slots. During your live interview, give a brief resume of your own experience and mention that you are currently looking for employment. This will work with civilians too, if you give them a story their audience wants to hear.

Search for local TV, radio, newspapers, and magazines in your local area.  Magazines in the USA,  USA newspapers, USA TV stations, and USA local news media by city and state.

P.S. If you are a U.S. veteran, reach out to me. Let’s talk and see if I can be of any further assistance. Mark Baird/ ceo@hirepatriots.com/ 760-730-3734

Naval Veteran And Successful Franchisee Swaps Brands: Adds Top-Rated Mobile Flooring Business To His Portfolio

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Keith Yound stands outsinde in front of his work vehicle

If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. Keith Young was already a successful franchise owner with FirstService Brands, the leading North American brand in the property services industry. So when he sold his CertaPro Painters of Central Houston franchise after 10 years, he didn’t have to look far for his next opportunity. The 48-year-old Young stayed within the FirstService Brands family and became a franchise owner with Floor Coverings International, visiting customers’ homes in a Mobile Flooring Showroom stocked with thousands of flooring samples from top manufacturers.

Young is also a U.S. Navy veteran, who has put an emphasis on hiring veterans in the past and plans to continue that practice with Floor Coverings International. “I will be hiring a sales associate before the end of 2019,” Young said. “Military veterans make very successful franchise owners and employees since they know how to follow a proven system and take responsibility for achieving their objectives,” Young shared.

“Having 10 years’ experience as a painting contractor delivering at a consistently high level of service was the perfect background to set me up for success in the flooring business,” said Young. “I was ready for a new challenge and was already aware of Floor Coverings International since it is owned by the same parent company as CertaPro Painters. I wanted to stay in that family and that gave me a high level of confidence in the brand.”

In Floor Coverings International, Young found a company that has tripled in size since 2005 by putting a laser focus on consumer buying habits and expressed desires, its impressive operating model, growth ability, marketing, advertising and merchandising. Floor Coverings International further separates itself from the competition through its customer experience, made up of several simple and integrated steps that exceed customers’ expectations.

ABOUT FLOOR COVERINGS INTERNATIONAL

Floor Coverings International is the #1 Mobile Flooring Franchise in North America. Utilizing a unique in-home experience, the mobile showroom comes directly to the customer’s door with more than 3,000 flooring choices. Floor Coverings International has 150-plus locations throughout the U.S. and Canada with plenty of opportunity for continued expansion in 2019. For franchise information, please visit flooring-franchise.com and to find your closest location, floorcoveringsinternational.com.

Sisters Transform Military Materials Into ‘Beautiful’ Bags — and Use the Profits to Help Vets

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Emilly Nunez and Bestsy Nunez pose with Emily carrrying an army green signature military bag

When Emily Nunez Cavness was in college seven years ago in Vermont, she and her sister, Betsy Nunez, launched a plan to start a business that turns excess military gear into handbags.

Their company, Sword & Plough, employs veterans and gives a percentage of profits to military charities.

The idea germinated when Emily — then a senior at Middlebury College — attended a lecture that prompted her to think about how to use recycling as part of a business model. The daughter of an Army veteran and herself an ROTC student at the time, Emily gravitated toward a theme connected to the armed forces.

“What in my life is often discarded and could be turned into something beautiful with a purposeful mission?” she asked herself at the time, according to the company’s website.

“I immediately thought about military surplus materials,” Emily tells PEOPLE. “Then I looked around the room and saw that everyone had bags by their side.”

That, she says, was her a-ha moment.

“I thought to myself, ‘We could take these extremely durable materials that have such unique stories and turn them into fashionable bags that anyone would want to use,’ ” she recalls.

Betsy soon signed on as chief operating officer, and the two formed Sword and Plough in 2012, when Emily was 22 and Betsy, 24. Now, they run a thriving mail order business selling bags, jewelry, and accessories.

The bags start out as tents, sleeping bag covers, leather, hardware, canvas, nylon, and old uniforms. The materialsSignature tote blue and army green tote bag pictured are shipped out to veteran-owned or operated manufacturers around the country, where they are turned into the final products. Because they are made out of military grade materials, the bags hold up well to wear, tear, and the elements, the sisters say.

Staying connected to the military community is important to the sisters.

“One of the best parts about Sword & Plough is meeting and working with such inspiring and talented veterans,” Emily says.

Continue on to People to read the complete article.

He Certified Choppers As Ready To Fly In The Navy; Now He’s Taking Those Skills To Home Inspections

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Jack Zaczek stands in front of his home inspection vehicle wearing a blue shirt and khaki pants

Buying or selling a house is an exercise that can be fraught with anxiety. Sometimes you need a calming influence, or more importantly, a voice of reason when it comes to making what is one of life’s big decisions.

In that situation, you want to turn to someone like Jack Zaczek, 48, who owns a Pillar To Post Home Inspectors® franchise, the brand to which more than three million families have turned to for 25 years to be their trusted advisor when buying or selling a home.

Zaczek is a retired veteran who spent more than 20 years in the Navy. Attention to detail and a sense of calm in times of stress are hallmarks of any veteran, and Zaczek certainly has the credentials. He retired as Navy Chief and was an Airframe and Flight Control Technician, certifying H60 Sea Hawk Helicopters safe for flight during eight – yes, eight – deployments to the Persian Gulf in direct support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom campaigns.

“The attention to detail the Navy taught me inspecting aircraft directly contributes to the high level of attention I give each home inspection I perform,” said Zaczek who serves homebuyers and sellers throughout Duval, Flagler, St. Johns, Putnam and Nassau counties in Florida.

While Zaczek has the requisite mindset required to be a successful home inspector, he also has the knowledge. Before joining the Navy in 1997, he worked in construction building custom homes in Oregon. “Pillar To Post is the perfect fit for me. I love the profession and take great pride in my own home,” Zaczek said. “Being a home inspector gives me the opportunity to help out and be involved with my community.”

Pillar to Post Home Inspectors is a popular franchise brand among veterans like Zaczek. The franchisor is a member of VetFran, a program of the International Franchise Association that helps vets purchase franchises and it has achieved 5-star status in that program, the top ranking possible. In 2018, one-third of new Pillar To Post Home inspectors franchisees were military vets. “Pillar To Post Home Inspectors has been ranked as the No. 1 home inspection franchise, and I’m proud to be a part of this winning team,” Zaczek said.

Tampa-based Pillar To Post Home Inspectors®, the largest home inspection company in North America, has consistently ranked as the top-rated home inspection company on Entrepreneur Magazine’s annual Franchise500®, Pillar To Post Home Inspectors is enjoying its 19th year in a row on that list.

A professional evaluation both inside and outside the home is at the core of Pillar To Post Home Inspectors’ service. Inspectors input data and digital photos into a computerized report that is provided to clients in a customized binder for easy reference, allowing homebuyers or sellers to make confident, informed decisions.

About Pillar To Post Home Inspectors®
Founded in 1994, Pillar To Post Home Inspectors is the largest home inspection company in North America with home offices in Toronto and Tampa. There are nearly 600 franchises located in 49 states and nine Canadian provinces. The company has been named as Best in Category in Entrepreneur Magazine’s Franchise500® ranking for 19 years in a row. Long-term plans include adding 500 to 600 new franchisees over the next five years. For further information, please visit pillartopost.com. To inquire about a franchise go to pillartopostfranchise.com.

Couple Brings A Wealth Of Experience To Help Combat Workplace Contagion With Enviro-Master Services

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Pictured outside their building is Willlie Jenkins, Jr., Kimberly Jenkins, Willie Jenkins

When you see terms such as “leading provider, recession-resistant, lack of competition” and “scalable,” associated with a franchise opportunity, it’s undoubtedly going to pique your interest.

And if it’s in an industry that can literally impact millions of people – by creating its own unique niche – you’re almost certainly going to want to know even more about this ground-floor opportunity. Mix in a company culture that’s equal to its growth potential… and you have the perfect list of ingredients that drew Willie Jenkins and Kimberly Clark to become franchise owners with Enviro-Master, North America’s leading health and safety-focused commercial cleaning service, which has doubled in size since 2012. They are seeing demand from many markets for their service because of the growing concerns about MRSA and other new tough to combat bacteria. Pictured left to right are Willie Jenkins, Jr., Kimberly Clark, Willie Jenkins, El Paso,TX.

“We are NOT like anyone else. We are UNIQUE,” said Willie. “When we first met with the corporate team from Enviro-Master we were truly impacted with how welcoming they were and that they wanted to know about ‘us’ and not just about our previous business experience. They genuinely cared about us as a family.”

Launched in January, Enviro-Master’s El Paso location serves businesses throughout El Paso, Las Cruces and Alamogordo, N.M., as well as Juarez, Mexico. Surrounding franchise areas still available are Albuquerque, Lubbock and Amarillo.

Willie, 49, has owned a janitorial cleaning company for 15 years while Kimberly, 57, has spent a decade in a civil servant role as an inventory/warehouse manager after a 24-year career in the U.S. Air Force before joining Enviro-Master, which provides unique processes and products that disinfect and sterilize surfaces that serve as breeding grounds for bacteria and viruses such as the flu, Hepatitis, Norovirus and MRSA. Enviro-Master’s commercial restroom hygiene service, which is applied with EPA-registered, non-toxic products, ensures 99.99 percent of germs are killed. “As a border city, we have many challenges dealing with the health and safety aspect due to travelers constantly going back and forth into Mexico,” Kimberly said. “We wanted to be a part of helping our neighbors within the city and even in Mexico.”

In Enviro-Master, Willie and Kimberly found a company that is a recognized leader in the $61 billion commercial cleaning industry, which is expected to grow by an additional two percent in 2019 alone, according to experts. Enviro-Master International Franchise has ranked five years in a row by Inc. 5000 as one of American’s Fastest Growing Private Companies. Their niche, which focuses on killing germs and bacteria, protects businesses, their employees and clients against the spread of infectious diseases. Currently targeting growth in major markets throughout North America, Enviro-Master’s continued growth is fueled by five basic fundamentals: 1) Large, identifiable markets; 2) Lack of competition; 3) Recession resistance; 4) Recurring revenue model; and 5) Service that can’t be displaced by technology.

“I’ve been in franchise development for more than 30 years and have not seen a concept with the strong fundamentals that we have at Enviro-Master,” said Brian Wieters, executive vice president of franchise development. Said Willie: “This is something we want to pass on to our children. We believe in leaving a legacy for our children’s children. Our plan for them is to be very aggressive in the future growth of our company.”

Markets being aggressively targeted for new franchises are Phoenix, Toronto, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Reno, New York and its boroughs, Denver, Boston and New Orleans. Call 1-833-GERMPROS for more information, or visit the website at https://www.enviro-master.info.