Delta Dental of California partners with National Association of Veterans Upward Bound

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Delta Dental of California partners with the National Association of Veterans Upward Bound to support student veteran scholarships.

Delta Dental of California has donated $4,000 to the National Association of Veterans Upward Bound (NAVUB) to support its efforts in facilitating the education and employment of student veterans.
Mary Meeks, NAVUB’s President, said: “The Association immensely appreciates the financial support as this will allow us to provide additional assistance to the veterans we serve and will ensure that their academic and career goals can be obtained.”

Veterans Upward Bound (VUB) is designed to motivate and assist veterans in the development of academic and other skills necessary for success in a program of postsecondary education. The VUB program provides assessment and enhancement of skills through counseling, mentoring, tutoring, and academic instruction. The primary goal of the program is to increase the rate at which veterans enroll in, and complete, college.

The members of NAVUB provide a one-stop resource for returning veterans to help them traverse various policies and programs of higher education. Veterans served by VUB programs located across the Nation and in Puerto Rico also receive support to address the challenges they face in re-entering the civilian workforce.

Veterans participating in VUB possess a wide range of military experiences (from all eras of service) including those who have served in recent campaigns and those who served prior to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Despite the availability of the Post-9/11 GI Bill, large numbers of military veterans transitioning to civilian life face financial hurdles beyond the scope of their educational benefits. The contribution by Delta Dental of California will provide funding for financial awards which are given directly into the hands of college-enrolled veterans with unmet financial needs.

Michelle Smith, chair of NAVUB’s scholarship commission, said the organization was extremely grateful for the financial support.

“I was thrilled to learn that Delta Dental of California has joined NAVUB’s effort to support student veterans with such a generous donation. These support scholarships are a ray of hope, especially for those students struggling with family financial obligations or for those students who are trying to work jobs while enrolled full-time. This additional funding will help clear the path for veterans to finish their degrees.”

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American Church Shootings and Crisis Management

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by J. Christopher Murphy; Senior Associate, Merletti, Gonzales & Associates International Security Consultants

In the 1960s, there was a popular old gospel song entitled “Church Twice on Sunday and Once in the Middle of the Week.” Church was not only popular for spiritual growth, but also for fellowship and social interaction. It was a central part of life in many communities. It was a safe haven!

Over the last ten years, we have seen an increase in church shootings, bomb threats to synagogues, and attacks on mosques. Studies of these incidents reveal that there is no religious, racial, socioeconomic, or denominational commonality. Our places of worship in America have become places of violence, or so it would seem. Most studies do not point to religion as the target, but instead, specific issues with the assailant. The gathering of people in a house of worship at predictable times is a tempting target. The most recent deadly church attack occurred on November 5, 2017, at First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs, Texas. The attack left twenty-six dead, and the motivation appeared to be domestic in nature. On May 17, 2015, Emmanuel AME Zion Church in Charleston, South Carolina, suffered a racially motivated shooting that killed nine people. Whatever the motivation, and whatever the assailant’s state of mind, the outcome of such attacks is absolutely tragic. Clearly, these once safe havens are now vulnerable targets that attract individuals who are planning evil, instead of seeking redemption.

Churches, synagogues, and mosques need to have an assessment conducted to better understand the security gaps in their normal weekly activities. Larger churches with television ministries are particularly vulnerable, due to their wider exposure. Nursery and youth activities are areas of great concern. A robust background investigation should be standard for all who work with youth and infants. Evacuation plans for violence, weather-related crises, and fires should be given strong attention. A security team should be designated and trained. Even if uniformed law enforcement directs traffic at a worship location, this does not substitute for an internal security team. High-value assets, both human and material, should be identified. The crisis management policy should specifically identify these assets and the responses associated with those assets. A well-trained security team that uses measured responses can effectively address unusual incidents, without losing sight of the intentional hospitality of these institutions. Leadership needs to be empowered to take physical action, even if the incident is happening on “sacred ground.”

These realities should warn the leadership of all holy places, regardless of size or location, to develop a plan to help protect their members. The plan should be documented, and training for that plan should be regularly scheduled.

We encourage all clergy, lay leaders, and concerned congregants to be deliberate in developing crisis management plans for their places of worship.

www.MGSecurityTeam.com

Kirstie Ennis: Going “Full Throttle”

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Kirstie Ennis

By Brady Rhoades

Veteran Kirstie Ennis is one of the best Paralympian snowboarders in the world, and she’s also eying the seven great summits, recently climbing 19,341-foot Mt. Kilimanjaro in Africa and 16,024-foot Carstensz Pyramid in Indonesia. On one leg.

As a Marine Corps sergeant. in Afghanistan—a helicopter door gunner—she wrecked a leg when the helicopter she was in crashed. That leg was amputated above the knee in 2015.

Her jaw was destroyed, she lost teeth, she injured discs in her spine, and she suffered facial lacerations, traumatic brain injury, and PTSD.

In the process of undergoing more than 40 surgeries, she came to a realization, acquiring a come-to-terms toughness and wisdom that would help motivate her to train as a snowboarder for the 2018 Winter Paralympic Games in Pyeongchang County, in the Gangwon region of South Korea.

And to attempt to conquer the tallest peaks on all seven continents.

Countless times a day, she repeats one of her mantras: Stop worrying about what you lost. Look at what you’ve got. Or: What counts is what’s behind your rib cage and six inches between your ears.

She’s only 26, but her near-death experience offered an invaluable lesson on how precious time is.

“I go full throttle,” she said. “I come up with obnoxious goals and I go after them.”

It’s hard to believe that this fifth-gear athlete chasing Paralympian goals—and literally ascending historic heights for an above-the-knee-amputee mountain climber—spent months in hospital beds, nearly lifeless, filled with doubt, enveloped in depression. She wondered how she’d ever get around, go on. What would she do? Would she ever wear a dress again? Would anyone ever be attracted to her?

Idle time can be a wounded warrior’s worst enemy. Fathers can be their best friends.

“Dad said, ‘People in the Middle East couldn’t kill you, and now you’re going to collapse?'” she recalls. “The light went on and I said, ‘I made it home. Nobody owes me a damn thing.'”

Kirstie Ennis

Ennis had to mine for the toughness that is at her core, but her sense of humor? That comes effortlessly.

The same year her leg was amputated, she participated in the Walking with the Wounded event, in which wounded warriors trek 1,000 miles, ending at Buckingham Palace in London. Ennis left dozens of dog tags bearing the names of fallen comrades along the way. She also met Prince Harry, a veteran of the war in Afghanistan.

Prince Harry, not one to shirk his duties, logged many miles during the event. At one point, he turned to Ennis and complained that his knee ached.

“I looked over and was like, ‘That’s (expletive) cute, really,’” Ennis said. Prince Harry cracked up.

Ennis and Prince Harry became fast friends. At the conclusion of her walk, she presented the final dog tag to him.

Their embrace was photographed and zoomed across the wires, making her a celebrity in a matter of minutes.

For her service to the country, Ennis has earned the NATO Medal, Combat Action Wings with three gold stars, National Defense Medal, Global War on Terrorism Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal, Air Medal, Good Conduct Medal, Afghanistan National Campaign Medal, two Letters of Appreciation, Certificate of Commendation, and a Certificate of Appreciation.

But who says you can’t be uber-tough and sexy?

ESPN called, asking her to grace the cover of ESPN The Magazine‘s 2017 Body Issue, with rather risqué photos of her on the inside pages. They wanted her to climb Joshua Tree, sans clothes.

She had her doubts. But Ennis tends to run toward challenges, toward fear.

“I thought about it and considered the demographic and the people Kirstie Ennisthat would see it, and I realized that it wasn’t about me anymore,” she said. “Any man, woman, or child facing some sort of adversity has the potential to be inspired by these pictures of someone who has only been missing her leg for a few years go out and do things she wasn’t doing with two legs.”

Ennis appeared in the Body Issue, along with other great athletes, such as Javier Baez (baseball), A.J. Andrews (softball), and Malakai Fekitoa (rugby).

The daughter of two Marines, Ennis enlisted out of Florida when she was 17 years old, in 2008. She served for four years as a helicopter door gunner and airframes mechanic when disaster struck on June 23, 2012.

While on her second deployment in Afghanistan, Ennis’ CH-53D helicopter crashed in the Helmand Province.

Badly injured, she fought to remain on active duty but was medically retired in 2014. After her below-the-knee amputation on November 23, 2015, Ennis contracted the antibiotic-resistant MRSA and, because of a resulting infection, doctors were forced to remove her knee a month later.

“A below-the-knee amputation is night-and-day from above-the-knee,” she said. “You have to relearn everything. You’re basically a toddler.”

When she was told that surgeons would have to perform above-the-knee surgery, she said she “lost it.” She cried. She wailed.

“It’s one curveball after another,” she said.

She still struggles, emotionally. “I’d be lying if I said it’s easy,” she said.

Two years after her life-altering surgery, she’s adapted, and she’s developed coping skills, which is a critical component of recovery.

Focus on what you have, not on what you don’t.

Set lofty goals.

Stay busy.

And true to her military training, be of service to others.

“When I’m having a bad day, I help someone who’s missing three limbs,” she said. “There’s this common misconception about what strength is. In the grand scheme of things, we’re in this together. You have to realize that you have to turn to somebody.”

Some of her best days involving helping other wounded warriors—whether it be through her notoriety as a star Paralympian or simply visiting a hospital.

“I know I’m on a platform,” she said. “I want to inspire people to reach their potential.”

She recalls a wounded warrior uttering eight words that she’ll never forget and that make her journey—as harrowing as it has been—worth it.

“You inspired me to walk another 10 steps,” the woman said.

 

Garden Grove native supports one of the Navy’s most versatile combat ships

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Darrell Post

SAN DIEGO – A 2001 Rancho Alamitos High School graduate and Garden Grove, California, native is serving in the U.S. Navy as part of the staff aboard Littoral Ship Squadron One, supporting one of the country’s most versatile combat ships.

Petty Officer 1st Class Darrell Post is a hull maintenance technician serving at Littoral Ship Squadron One in San Diego.

A hull maintenance technician is responsible for the metal work necessary to keep all types of shipboard structures in good shape.

“Following directions is something that I learned that has been vital to my success,” said Post. “Keeping a strong belief in procedural compliance has helped me stay focused and allowed me to progress in the Navy.”

The ship’s technological benefits allow for swapping mission packages quickly, meaning sailors can support multiple missions, such as surface warfare, mine warfare, or anti-submarine warfare.

Designed to defeat threats such as mines, quiet diesel submarines and fast surface craft, littoral combat ships are a bold departure from traditional Navy shipbuilding programs. The LCS sustainment strategy was developed to take into account the unique design and manning of LCS and its associated mission modules.

“Every single day our LCS surface warriors prove they are the best and the brightest – and let me tell you, they love their ships,” said Capt. M. Jordan Harrison, Commander, Littoral Combat Ship Squadron ONE.  “LCS are fast, agile, maneuverable and the minimal crew manning affords leadership and qualification opportunities you won’t get anywhere else in the Navy. Visit one of our ships and you will see ensigns and chiefs at the helm because that is just how highly trained and talented and motivated our officers and Sailors are in the LCS community.”

As one of the staff members at LCSRON supporting one of the Navy’s newest ships, Post explained they are building a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes. Staff members know how important it is for the Navy to develop new war-fighting capabilities to continue their success on the world’s oceans.

“My grandfather, dad and brother all served in the Army,” Post said. “They were an influence in me joining the military because I saw how the military helped set them up to better their lives.”

Post’s proudest accomplishment was being awarded an Iraq campaign medal.

Through innovative planning, the design of systems, and crew requirements, the LCS platform allows the fleet to increase forward presence and optimize its personnel, improving the ability of the Navy to be where it matters, when it matters.

“Serving in the Navy has instilled in me structure and a sense of belonging,” Post said. “The chain of command makes this a special place to come to work each day. They have helped me every step of the way since I checked in.”

Source: Navy Outreach

New Technology Alleviates Tinnitus by Retraining the Brain to Ignore Ringing in the Ears

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Tinntinitus

In Time for Tinnitus Week: New Approach Used During Sleep Offers Hope to Millions of People Who Suffer From the Most Common Health Condition in the U.S.

LOS ANGELES—David Giles, 57, began suffering from tinnitus as a teenager, when a firecracker went off near his ear. Giles says the debilitating condition, commonly known as “ringing in the ears,” has grown overpowering without going away.

He is one of as many as 50 million Americans suffering from tinnitus. Musicians, factory workers, military veterans and many others endure its effects, including problems with concentration, sleep, anxiety and depression.

Giles, who lives in Columbus, Ohio, traveled four hours to a doctor in East Lansing Michigan to try the Levo System, an FDA-approved technology that mimics the specific sounds of a patient’s individual tinnitus. The patient listens to the sounds through earbuds while sleeping. Because the brain is most responsive to sensory input during sleep, it grows accustomed to the sounds after a few months of treatment. It is a radically different approach that retrains the brain to ignore “ringing in the ears.”

New research underscores the promise of this approach.

A recently released randomized study by the National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research at the VA Portland Health Care System demonstrated improved clinical outcomes for tinnitus patients using the Levo System. The study was led by James Henry, PhD.

Study participants were assigned to the brain retraining technique using the Levo System or a commonly-used white noise masking machine. Patients using the Levo System reported the greatest improvement in tinnitus symptoms and the biggest decline in cognitive-related problems. These participants also reported the most significant improvement in their enjoyment of social activities and relationships with family and friends, key quality of life indicators.

For Giles, the Levo System was a life-changer. After a 90-day treatment, he reports that his tinnitus is no longer overpowering or debilitating, and has faded to the background, allowing him to enjoy his life as he once did.

Tinnitus affects a range of people, including those who are exposed to continuous noise. It is the leading service-related disability among U.S. veterans, according to the American Tinnitus Association.

The Levo System approach is grounded in the idea of personalized medicine. Rather than machines or doctors selecting sound matches in the customary fashion, patients choose the actual sounds they hear when they sleep. When patients take an active role addressing their tinnitus, they often feel a sense of mastery and control.

“It is gratifying to see so many people experience relief from a condition that has defied a long-term solution,” said Michael Baker, president and Oregon-based CEO of Otoharmonics Corp., which produces the Levo System. “Patients report the greatest improvement when they drive decisions about their treatment.”

The Levo System has been cleared by the Food and Drug Administration for marketing in the U.S. Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles is Otoharmonics’ majority stakeholder.

V.A. Study  http://AJA.pubs.asha.org/article.aspx?doi=10.1044/2017_AJA-17-0022

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U.S. Air Force’s Heritage Flight to perform flyover for Super Bowl LII

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Heritage Flight

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Air Force Heritage Flight is scheduled to perform the flyover at the start of Super Bowl LII in Minneapolis, Minnesota, February 4.

The Heritage Flight will consist of one F-16 Fighting Falcon, two A-10 Thunderbolt IIs and one P-51 Mustang flying in formation over U.S. Bank Stadium. This is the first time the Heritage Flight team will conduct a flyover for a Super Bowl, and it will be broadcast live on NBC and in U.S. Bank Stadium from multiple vantage points, including an in-flight perspective from a camera mounted on the P-51 Mustang.

The United States Air Force Heritage Flight Program presents the evolution of United States Air Force air power by flying today’s state-of-the-art fighter aircraft in close formation with vintage aircraft, dramatically displays Air Force history, and proudly supports our Air Force’s recruiting and retention efforts. As part of the Heritage Flight program, the Air Force Heritage Flight Foundation honors the sacrifices of those who have served or are currently serving in the Air Force through participation in these flight displays.

The teams representing the Air Force in the Heritage Flight for Super Bowl LII are the F-16 Viper Demonstration Team from Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, the A-10 Thunderbolt Demonstration Team from Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona and a vintage P-51 Mustang flown by pilot Steve Hinton from the Air Force Heritage Flight Foundation, California founded by chairman Dan Friedkin.

Airpower Foundation Announces Changes to it’s Executive Board of Directors

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The Airpower Foundation is announcing changes to it’s Executive Board of Directors. These changes were effective January 1, 2018.

Sid Eppes, former Vice Chairman, has been elected Chairman, and Major General Kevin Pottinger, (Ret.) USAF, has been elected Vice Chairman by the Airpower Foundation Board of Directors.

The Airpower Foundation expresses it’s sincere gratitude to Mr. Palomares for his numerous years, and countless hours of dedicated volunteer service and leadership as Chairman. Mr. Palomares will remain on the Foundation board.

Mr. Eppes has been a long time member of the Airpower Foundation board, has been instrumental in assisting with the growth and development of the foundation over the years, and served as Chairman of the Grants Review Committee. He served four years as Chairman of the Fort Worth Airpower Council, the oldest civilian military support origination in the nation, and also has served as the Sky Ball Vice Chairman / Operations Director for the past 10 years.

Mr. Eppes’ extensive experience with sponsor relations, organizational partnerships, knowledge of the veteran support community, and relationships with nationally elected officials, will be instrumental to lead the foundation as we continue to grow and increase our support to those who serve and their families.

Major General Pottinger joined the Airpower Foundation Board 4 years ago as the military liaison/advisor and was voted as a director in 2016. Mr. Pottinger has contributed significantly to the Airpower Foundation over the years with his guidance from his military background. We look forward to his leadership as Vice Chairman in the years to come, in addition to his newly appointed role as the Chairman of the Grants Review Committee.

Emergency Management Collaboration

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By: J. Christopher Murphy; Senior Associate, Retired US Secret Service

For the last forty years, I’ve worked in city, state, and federal public safety. I’ve encountered man-made emergencies from hostage situations to a mass murder incident spread over multiple jurisdictions. Natural disasters, from fires to hurricanes, are a fact of life. The successful management of these events requires one essential thing – collaboration.

Whether in military or civilian public safety, the natural tendency is to proudly assume, “We’ve got this!” Often, we do. However, if a situation grows beyond our expectation and ability to manage, it’s simply too late to add this essential tool to our plan. A willingness and ability to collaborate with sister agencies needs to be in place at all times. No matter how strong each component is, we are wise to include all available resources in the “We’ve got this!” plan.

All incidents start locally. That local authority, military or civilian, will answer for the successful or unsuccessful resolution of the crisis. There may be human life and property damage issues, but there will also be political and public relations issues. To successfully defend our solution, we must demonstrate that we “played in the sandbox well” and had the same goals. The training and assessment of such collaborative teamwork is one key to my success in public service.

As public safety director for Montgomery, AL, I was fortunate to be in partnership with Maxwell/Gunter AFB and Air University. With the support of the three star, the Colonel of the 42nd MSG and I coordinated a mock training exercise preparing for civil unrest. Other jurisdictions joined the exercise. An assessment, following this, provided lessons learned and training needs forward. Relationships were strengthened and unity of purpose set. These mock training scenarios are invaluable.

The Incident Command System (ICS) outlines the division of labor for an Emergency Operations Center (EOC). However, we have found equally important the Director’s Crisis Center (DCC). This center is designed to have top commanders of all collaborating agencies in one place to make command decisions. The EOC will, then, implement the decisions made in the DCC. The crisis will dictate the leadership in the DCC. This can include community, business, or academic leadership depending on the nature and location of the crisis. The DCC also provides a central place where these leaders can come to be fully briefed and participate in the decision-making process. This site also keeps those ultimate leaders from going to the scene! If the media knows the decision makers and the decisions are at the DCC, then it draws them to the DCC and away from the scene. This system lets the DCC better control the public information “message” and works to protect the on-scene commanders trying to do their job.

At Merletti, Gonzales & Associates, we have a wealth of experience in Emergency Management and are currently working various foreign and domestic projects in this arena. Please visit our website at www.MGSecurityTeam.com to learn more.

U.S. Department of Labor Launches HIRE Vets Medallion Program Demonstration

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Medallions

WASHINGTON, DC – The U.S. Department of Labor today announced the launch of the HIRE Vets Medallion Program Demonstration – an effort that will recognize up to 300 employers for their investments in recruiting, employing, and retaining our nation’s veterans.

The program demonstration will raise awareness of the HIRE Vets Medallion Program, which kicks off in 2019. The program utilizes the requirements of the Honoring Investments in Recruiting and Employing American Military Veterans Act of 2017 (HIRE Vets Act) signed by President Trump in May 2017 to determine awardees. The program will recognize large, medium, and small employers at two levels, platinum or gold, depending on the criteria they meet.

The demonstration will use the same criteria as the full HIRE Vets Medallion Program and enable more employers to prepare to successfully complete the medallion award application for the full implementation of the program in 2019.

Program demonstration applications will be available on Jan. 31, 2018, online at www.hirevets.gov. The demonstration has no application fee and is limited to the first 300 applications across all categories (large, medium, and small employers). Any employer with at least one employee on staff is eligible to apply. Employers recognized in the 2018 Program Demonstration will also be eligible to apply for the 2019 Program.

“Military service develops leadership skills, technical expertise, and problem-solving capabilities—all in demand by America’s companies,” said U.S. Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta. “The HIRE Vets Medallion Program provides a tremendous opportunity for employers to recruit talented veterans and demonstrate support for those who have sacrificed so much for their country.”

In November 2017, the Department announced its Final Rule for the Honoring Investments in Recruiting and Employing American Military Veterans Act. The HIRE Vets Medallion has a rigorous criterion that recognizes employers’ commitment to veteran careers, including hiring, retention, and long-term development. The award signals to veterans that an employer is committed to and supports veteran careers.

Employers seeking further information should visit www.HIREVets.gov for updates, or contact HIREVETS@dol.gov.

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United We Stand: Recognizing Black History Month

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henry johnson

In the early pre-dawn hours of May 14, 1918, Army Pvt. Henry Johnson, part of the all-black 369th Infantry Regiment, took part in a five-man patrol to defend against enemy ambushes in the Argonne Forest in France.

At 2:30 a.m., 24 German soldiers attacked the patrol’s position. Johnson defended his comrades by throwing all the grenades he could find at the enemy and then fired his own weapon until it jammed. When the enemy soldiers swarmed the trench Johnson was defending, he fought them off with the butt of his rifle and then his bare hands.

Johnson, wounded 21 times, sent the Germans into retreat. This encounter became known as “The Battle of Henry Johnson” and was reported in national newspapers in the United States later in the year.

France subsequently awarded Johnson the Croix de Guerre avec Palme (War Cross with Palm), France’s highest award for valor. And in a memo later that same month, Gen. John Pershing, commander of the American Expeditionary Force during World War I, called Johnson’s actions “a notable instance of bravery,” and Johnson was promoted to sergeant.

But after the war, Johnson was nearly completely disabled due to his wounds. Despite his noted heroics, he and other black soldiers were denied medical care and disability pay. He would be posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor by President Barack Obama on June 2, 2015, but the recognition came far too late. Johnson died in poverty at 32 years old, according to the Smithsonian and a study released by the Equal Justice Initiative (EJI).

As we celebrate Black History Month, the EJI offers a historical and detailed account of the injustices black veterans like Johnson endured in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including instances of violence and abuse, inequality of military pay and denial of earned veterans benefits.

During World War I, more than 350,000 African Americans served in segregated units. When World War II erupted, more than a million were drafted or volunteered to serve. The Korean War saw the decommissioning of some, though not all, segregated units, despite a 1948 executive order to integrate the military. And after entering the Vietnam War, America saw the highest proportion of black service members—but also casualty rates as high as 25 percent.

In spite of African Americans’ proud military heritage predating the Revolutionary War, the EJI study sheds light on the treatment of black veterans after service.

“It’s important that, as individuals and veterans, we show that the history of how our country treated minority veterans in the past is not a pleasant one,” said DAV (Disabled American Veterans) National Commander Delphine Metcalf-Foster, whose father was a Buffalo Soldier. “We should never forget the painful lessons this teaches. DAV knows the veteran community is made stronger by diversity, and we will continue our mission of advocacy for all veterans.”

The entire EJI report can be found at eji.org/reports/online.

Source:  Dav.org

Celebrity Chef Robert Irvine and Legendary Soul Man- Sam Moore Join Code of Support Foundation Advisory Board

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Sam Moore-Chef Robert Irvine

ALEXANDRIA, Va., Jan. 11, 2018– Code of Support Foundation (COSF) is honored to announce that Celebrity Chef Robert Irvine and Legendary Soul Man™ – Sam Moore have joined COSF’s Advisory Board. In recent years, Chef Irvine and the Legendary Soul Man – Sam Moore have demonstrated their unwavering support of our nation’s military service members, veterans, and their families by creating awareness by leveraging their own celebrity profiles to engage the 99% of Americans who benefit from the service and sacrifice of our nation’s heroes.

Code of Support Foundation announces that Legendary Soul Man™ – Sam Moore and Chef Robert Irvine have joined COSF’s Advisory Board. In recent years, the Legendary Soul Man – Sam Moore and Chef Irvine have demonstrated their unwavering support of our nation’s military service members, veterans, and their families by creating awareness by leveraging their own celebrity profiles to engage the 99% of Americans who benefit from the service and sacrifice of our nation’s heroes.

Code of Support Foundation announces that Celebrity Chef Robert Irvine and Legendary Soul Man™ – Sam Moore have joined COSF’s Advisory Board. In recent years, Chef Irvine and the Legendary Soul Man – Sam Moore have demonstrated their unwavering support of our nation’s military service members, veterans, and their families by creating awareness by leveraging their own celebrity profiles to engage the 99% of Americans who benefit from the service and sacrifice of our nation’s…

“Chef Irvine and Legendary Soul Man™ – Sam Moore’srespective passion combined with their steadfast commitment of engaging our civilian population is a true testament to Code of Support’s vision to bridge our nation’s civilian-military divide. We are thrilled to have Chef Irvine and Sam Moore join the distinguished ranks of Code of Support’s Advisory Board,” says Major General Alan B. Salisbury, USA, Ret., Chairman, and CEO of Code of Support Foundation

COSF Advisor Board Members include Medal of Honor Recipient COL Harvey (Barney) Barnum, Jr., USMC, Ret.; former 16th Chairman of the Joints Chief of Staff Gen Peter Pace, USMC, Ret.; former NFL quarterback of the Philadelphia Eagles and Washington Redskins Sonny Jurgensen; and Men’s Basketball Head Coach for Duke University Mike (“Coach K”) Krzyzewski, among others.

“Anytime I get to contribute something meaningful to the lives of our men and women in uniform, it’s an honor that adds purpose and value to my own life. When you get to do so alongside great people, it makes it a true joy. I am thrilled to join Sam Moore and all the wonderful members of the Code of Support Advisory Board and I am ready to work to improve the lives of the best and bravest among us,” says Robert Irvine. 

“I am honored to be able to continue my support of those who serve and have served in our military by joining the Code of Support Foundation’s Advisory Board and to support COSF’s efforts by bringing greater awareness to the contributions made by our nation’s service members and veterans who’ve sacrificed so much to ensure our freedoms,” says Sam Moore – Legendary Soul ManTM.

Chef Irvine, a former member of the British Royal Navy, is a world-class chef and TV personality. In 2014, he founded the Robert Irvine Foundation to support veterans and veteran causes in need of assistance. The Foundation works to help those individuals and organizations that are committed to enriching the lives of military personnel (active, retired and veterans) and their families. A portion of proceeds from Robert Irvine Foods is given to the foundation in addition to public donations. Throughout the year, Chef Irvine can be found attending troop rallies held by the Gary Sinise Foundation as well as touring regularly with the USO. Maximizing his culinary skills, Chef Irvine visits with service members and their families while dishing up fine cuisine and providing cooking classes.

Chef Irvine has been honored with three distinguished recognitions for his dedication to the armed services and our country’s heroes including being selected by the Office of the Secretary of Defense as this year’s Spirit of Hope Award winner. The honor recognizes those who go above and beyond to provide aid to those who serve our country. Chef Irvine is also a designated U.S. Navy Honorary Chief Petty Officer and a recipient of the Bob Hope Award for Excellence in Entertainment and Support of Our Service Members.

Legendary Soul Man™ – Sam Moore’s Grammy award-winning voice has been heard around the globe, across multiple music genres connecting audiences of all generations for more than 60 years.  Over the span of his critically acclaimed career, Moore’s music has been a universal and driving force to help bridge gaps among social divides. His recent artistic endeavor to bring greater awareness of the nation’s armed services and veterans has been met not only with rave reviews and standing ovations but has also re-engaged civilian audiences who have experienced an awe-inspiring sense of patriotism. Within the past year, Moore has performed exclusive renditions from his American Patriot album of iconic American classics for several veteran fundraisers including the Opening Ceremonies of the 2017 Warrior Games in Chicago, Johnny Vet: Freedom Isn’t Free in Washington, DC, and Guitar Lessons for Heroes in New York.

Moore is the recipient of numerous awards including the coveted NARAS Heroes Award, an AFTRA AMEE Lifetime Achievement Award, the ETAM Living Legend Award, Rhythm & Blues Foundation Pioneer Award, and a MOBO Lifetime Achievement Award. He was also inducted into the GRAMMY Hall of Fame for “Soul Man,” and in 2016 his star was permanently placed in the Music City Walk of Fame in Nashville, Tennessee.

About Code of Support Foundation 
Founded in 2011, Code of Support Foundation (COSF) is a national 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that provides essential and critical one-on-one assistance to those service members, veterans and their families who have the most complex needs and are on the brink of crisis. COSF is dedicated to leveraging the nation’s full spectrum of resources to ensure all members of our military, veterans and their families receive the support services they need and, through their collective sacrifice, have earned. COSF’s integrated programs include personalized, holistic long-term case coordination services that serve all service eras across the nation. To learn more click here.

About Robert Irvine
With more than 25 years in the culinary profession, Chef Robert Irvine has cooked his way through Europe, the Far East, the Caribbean and the Americas, in hotels and on the high seas. As the host of one of the Food Network’s highest-rated shows, Restaurant: Impossible, Irvine saved struggling restaurants across America by assessing and overhauling the restaurant’s weakest spots. Irvine was previously the host of Food Network’s Dinner: Impossible and Worst Cooks in America, has authored two cookbooks, Mission: Cook! and Impossible to Easy, and one healthy living book, Fit Fuel: A Chef’s Guide to Eating Well and Living Your Best Life. Irvine is currently on tour with his new, interactive live show Robert Irvine Live, and appears regularly as an expert guest on national morning and daytime talk shows. Irvine recently established the eponymously named non-profit organization, The Robert Irvine Foundation, in an effort to support military personnel and their families. For more information on Chef Robert Irvine click here.

About Sam Moore – The Legendary Soul Man™
The first 20-plus years of Sam Moore’s sensational career began by lending his unmistakable lead vocals to soul duo Sam & Dave. The 1967 smash hit “Soul Man,” catapulted the duo’s career up the Pop and R&B Charts, selling more than 10 million records worldwide and ultimately an induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.  Moore also scored critical acclaim and numerous awards as a solo artist for more than 35 years, performing at some of the world’s most iconic and notable venues, including Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, The Hollywood Bowl, Ryman Auditorium, The Grand Old Opry, Royal Albert Hall, Nippon Budokan, The John F. Kennedy Center, The White House, Lincoln Memorial and Washington Monument. Moore has recently joined Florida International University (FIU) as an Artist in Residence for their Center of Humanities to build a program around the artist histories that shaped our culture through music. For more information on The Legendary Soul Man™ – Sam Moore click here.