Female US marine breaks glass ceiling by becoming the force’s first woman officer

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A female marine has broken the glass ceiling by becoming the first to qualify as an officer for the elite force.

The lieutenant, who did not want to be named, was accepted after completing the famously grueling marine officer training.

She is the first woman to do so since the US military opened up the role to women in April last year.

Less than a quarter of recruits who start marine officer training qualify.

Around 10% drop out within the first day.

The US Marines said that 131 hopefuls began training in the intake the included the female lieutenant, of whom 88 graduated.

Force Commandant General Robert Neller hailed her achievement as he congratulated all those who passed.

“I am proud of this officer and those in her class‎ who have earned the infantry officer MOS [military occupational specialty],” he said.

Marines expect and rightfully deserve competent and capable leaders, and these IOC graduates met every training requirement as they prepare for the next challenge of leading infantry Marines; ultimately, in combat.”

Continue onto ITVNews to read the complete article.

American Church Shootings and Crisis Management

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by J. Christopher Murphy; Senior Associate, Merletti, Gonzales & Associates International Security Consultants

In the 1960s, there was a popular old gospel song entitled “Church Twice on Sunday and Once in the Middle of the Week.” Church was not only popular for spiritual growth, but also for fellowship and social interaction. It was a central part of life in many communities. It was a safe haven!

Over the last ten years, we have seen an increase in church shootings, bomb threats to synagogues, and attacks on mosques. Studies of these incidents reveal that there is no religious, racial, socioeconomic, or denominational commonality. Our places of worship in America have become places of violence, or so it would seem. Most studies do not point to religion as the target, but instead, specific issues with the assailant. The gathering of people in a house of worship at predictable times is a tempting target. The most recent deadly church attack occurred on November 5, 2017, at First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs, Texas. The attack left twenty-six dead, and the motivation appeared to be domestic in nature. On May 17, 2015, Emmanuel AME Zion Church in Charleston, South Carolina, suffered a racially motivated shooting that killed nine people. Whatever the motivation, and whatever the assailant’s state of mind, the outcome of such attacks is absolutely tragic. Clearly, these once safe havens are now vulnerable targets that attract individuals who are planning evil, instead of seeking redemption.

Churches, synagogues, and mosques need to have an assessment conducted to better understand the security gaps in their normal weekly activities. Larger churches with television ministries are particularly vulnerable, due to their wider exposure. Nursery and youth activities are areas of great concern. A robust background investigation should be standard for all who work with youth and infants. Evacuation plans for violence, weather-related crises, and fires should be given strong attention. A security team should be designated and trained. Even if uniformed law enforcement directs traffic at a worship location, this does not substitute for an internal security team. High-value assets, both human and material, should be identified. The crisis management policy should specifically identify these assets and the responses associated with those assets. A well-trained security team that uses measured responses can effectively address unusual incidents, without losing sight of the intentional hospitality of these institutions. Leadership needs to be empowered to take physical action, even if the incident is happening on “sacred ground.”

These realities should warn the leadership of all holy places, regardless of size or location, to develop a plan to help protect their members. The plan should be documented, and training for that plan should be regularly scheduled.

We encourage all clergy, lay leaders, and concerned congregants to be deliberate in developing crisis management plans for their places of worship.

www.MGSecurityTeam.com

Garden Grove native supports one of the Navy’s most versatile combat ships

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Darrell Post

SAN DIEGO – A 2001 Rancho Alamitos High School graduate and Garden Grove, California, native is serving in the U.S. Navy as part of the staff aboard Littoral Ship Squadron One, supporting one of the country’s most versatile combat ships.

Petty Officer 1st Class Darrell Post is a hull maintenance technician serving at Littoral Ship Squadron One in San Diego.

A hull maintenance technician is responsible for the metal work necessary to keep all types of shipboard structures in good shape.

“Following directions is something that I learned that has been vital to my success,” said Post. “Keeping a strong belief in procedural compliance has helped me stay focused and allowed me to progress in the Navy.”

The ship’s technological benefits allow for swapping mission packages quickly, meaning sailors can support multiple missions, such as surface warfare, mine warfare, or anti-submarine warfare.

Designed to defeat threats such as mines, quiet diesel submarines and fast surface craft, littoral combat ships are a bold departure from traditional Navy shipbuilding programs. The LCS sustainment strategy was developed to take into account the unique design and manning of LCS and its associated mission modules.

“Every single day our LCS surface warriors prove they are the best and the brightest – and let me tell you, they love their ships,” said Capt. M. Jordan Harrison, Commander, Littoral Combat Ship Squadron ONE.  “LCS are fast, agile, maneuverable and the minimal crew manning affords leadership and qualification opportunities you won’t get anywhere else in the Navy. Visit one of our ships and you will see ensigns and chiefs at the helm because that is just how highly trained and talented and motivated our officers and Sailors are in the LCS community.”

As one of the staff members at LCSRON supporting one of the Navy’s newest ships, Post explained they are building a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes. Staff members know how important it is for the Navy to develop new war-fighting capabilities to continue their success on the world’s oceans.

“My grandfather, dad and brother all served in the Army,” Post said. “They were an influence in me joining the military because I saw how the military helped set them up to better their lives.”

Post’s proudest accomplishment was being awarded an Iraq campaign medal.

Through innovative planning, the design of systems, and crew requirements, the LCS platform allows the fleet to increase forward presence and optimize its personnel, improving the ability of the Navy to be where it matters, when it matters.

“Serving in the Navy has instilled in me structure and a sense of belonging,” Post said. “The chain of command makes this a special place to come to work each day. They have helped me every step of the way since I checked in.”

Source: Navy Outreach

U.S. Air Force’s Heritage Flight to perform flyover for Super Bowl LII

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Heritage Flight

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Air Force Heritage Flight is scheduled to perform the flyover at the start of Super Bowl LII in Minneapolis, Minnesota, February 4.

The Heritage Flight will consist of one F-16 Fighting Falcon, two A-10 Thunderbolt IIs and one P-51 Mustang flying in formation over U.S. Bank Stadium. This is the first time the Heritage Flight team will conduct a flyover for a Super Bowl, and it will be broadcast live on NBC and in U.S. Bank Stadium from multiple vantage points, including an in-flight perspective from a camera mounted on the P-51 Mustang.

The United States Air Force Heritage Flight Program presents the evolution of United States Air Force air power by flying today’s state-of-the-art fighter aircraft in close formation with vintage aircraft, dramatically displays Air Force history, and proudly supports our Air Force’s recruiting and retention efforts. As part of the Heritage Flight program, the Air Force Heritage Flight Foundation honors the sacrifices of those who have served or are currently serving in the Air Force through participation in these flight displays.

The teams representing the Air Force in the Heritage Flight for Super Bowl LII are the F-16 Viper Demonstration Team from Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, the A-10 Thunderbolt Demonstration Team from Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona and a vintage P-51 Mustang flown by pilot Steve Hinton from the Air Force Heritage Flight Foundation, California founded by chairman Dan Friedkin.

Airpower Foundation Announces Changes to it’s Executive Board of Directors

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The Airpower Foundation is announcing changes to it’s Executive Board of Directors. These changes were effective January 1, 2018.

Sid Eppes, former Vice Chairman, has been elected Chairman, and Major General Kevin Pottinger, (Ret.) USAF, has been elected Vice Chairman by the Airpower Foundation Board of Directors.

The Airpower Foundation expresses it’s sincere gratitude to Mr. Palomares for his numerous years, and countless hours of dedicated volunteer service and leadership as Chairman. Mr. Palomares will remain on the Foundation board.

Mr. Eppes has been a long time member of the Airpower Foundation board, has been instrumental in assisting with the growth and development of the foundation over the years, and served as Chairman of the Grants Review Committee. He served four years as Chairman of the Fort Worth Airpower Council, the oldest civilian military support origination in the nation, and also has served as the Sky Ball Vice Chairman / Operations Director for the past 10 years.

Mr. Eppes’ extensive experience with sponsor relations, organizational partnerships, knowledge of the veteran support community, and relationships with nationally elected officials, will be instrumental to lead the foundation as we continue to grow and increase our support to those who serve and their families.

Major General Pottinger joined the Airpower Foundation Board 4 years ago as the military liaison/advisor and was voted as a director in 2016. Mr. Pottinger has contributed significantly to the Airpower Foundation over the years with his guidance from his military background. We look forward to his leadership as Vice Chairman in the years to come, in addition to his newly appointed role as the Chairman of the Grants Review Committee.

Emergency Management Collaboration

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By: J. Christopher Murphy; Senior Associate, Retired US Secret Service

For the last forty years, I’ve worked in city, state, and federal public safety. I’ve encountered man-made emergencies from hostage situations to a mass murder incident spread over multiple jurisdictions. Natural disasters, from fires to hurricanes, are a fact of life. The successful management of these events requires one essential thing – collaboration.

Whether in military or civilian public safety, the natural tendency is to proudly assume, “We’ve got this!” Often, we do. However, if a situation grows beyond our expectation and ability to manage, it’s simply too late to add this essential tool to our plan. A willingness and ability to collaborate with sister agencies needs to be in place at all times. No matter how strong each component is, we are wise to include all available resources in the “We’ve got this!” plan.

All incidents start locally. That local authority, military or civilian, will answer for the successful or unsuccessful resolution of the crisis. There may be human life and property damage issues, but there will also be political and public relations issues. To successfully defend our solution, we must demonstrate that we “played in the sandbox well” and had the same goals. The training and assessment of such collaborative teamwork is one key to my success in public service.

As public safety director for Montgomery, AL, I was fortunate to be in partnership with Maxwell/Gunter AFB and Air University. With the support of the three star, the Colonel of the 42nd MSG and I coordinated a mock training exercise preparing for civil unrest. Other jurisdictions joined the exercise. An assessment, following this, provided lessons learned and training needs forward. Relationships were strengthened and unity of purpose set. These mock training scenarios are invaluable.

The Incident Command System (ICS) outlines the division of labor for an Emergency Operations Center (EOC). However, we have found equally important the Director’s Crisis Center (DCC). This center is designed to have top commanders of all collaborating agencies in one place to make command decisions. The EOC will, then, implement the decisions made in the DCC. The crisis will dictate the leadership in the DCC. This can include community, business, or academic leadership depending on the nature and location of the crisis. The DCC also provides a central place where these leaders can come to be fully briefed and participate in the decision-making process. This site also keeps those ultimate leaders from going to the scene! If the media knows the decision makers and the decisions are at the DCC, then it draws them to the DCC and away from the scene. This system lets the DCC better control the public information “message” and works to protect the on-scene commanders trying to do their job.

At Merletti, Gonzales & Associates, we have a wealth of experience in Emergency Management and are currently working various foreign and domestic projects in this arena. Please visit our website at www.MGSecurityTeam.com to learn more.

U.S. Department of Labor Launches HIRE Vets Medallion Program Demonstration

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Medallions

WASHINGTON, DC – The U.S. Department of Labor today announced the launch of the HIRE Vets Medallion Program Demonstration – an effort that will recognize up to 300 employers for their investments in recruiting, employing, and retaining our nation’s veterans.

The program demonstration will raise awareness of the HIRE Vets Medallion Program, which kicks off in 2019. The program utilizes the requirements of the Honoring Investments in Recruiting and Employing American Military Veterans Act of 2017 (HIRE Vets Act) signed by President Trump in May 2017 to determine awardees. The program will recognize large, medium, and small employers at two levels, platinum or gold, depending on the criteria they meet.

The demonstration will use the same criteria as the full HIRE Vets Medallion Program and enable more employers to prepare to successfully complete the medallion award application for the full implementation of the program in 2019.

Program demonstration applications will be available on Jan. 31, 2018, online at www.hirevets.gov. The demonstration has no application fee and is limited to the first 300 applications across all categories (large, medium, and small employers). Any employer with at least one employee on staff is eligible to apply. Employers recognized in the 2018 Program Demonstration will also be eligible to apply for the 2019 Program.

“Military service develops leadership skills, technical expertise, and problem-solving capabilities—all in demand by America’s companies,” said U.S. Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta. “The HIRE Vets Medallion Program provides a tremendous opportunity for employers to recruit talented veterans and demonstrate support for those who have sacrificed so much for their country.”

In November 2017, the Department announced its Final Rule for the Honoring Investments in Recruiting and Employing American Military Veterans Act. The HIRE Vets Medallion has a rigorous criterion that recognizes employers’ commitment to veteran careers, including hiring, retention, and long-term development. The award signals to veterans that an employer is committed to and supports veteran careers.

Employers seeking further information should visit www.HIREVets.gov for updates, or contact HIREVETS@dol.gov.

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Variety Presents Inaugural Salute To Service Event

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Variety Salute to Service

Variety, the authoritative entertainment industry news source, presented their inaugural SALUTE TO SERVICE event, a celebration of the notable efforts and contributions by various individuals shining light on military services and related organizations.

The event was held at Cipriani 25 Broadway on Thursday, January 11th.  In partnership with National Geographic, Variety was thrilled to gather an intimate group of distinguished individuals who have been selected as honorees, as well additional service members, supporters and contributors as guests.

Through their courageous, humanitarian and philanthropic efforts, these individuals have supported our troops and veterans, some serving themselves, and have created significant differences in the lives of service members and their families. Variety’s Salute to Service honorees were featured in the issue on stands January 10th.

“As the leading entertainment voice in the industry we feel it is timely and important to honor the bravery and heroism of our military service members and those who have dedicated their time and efforts in supporting our troops and their families,” said Michelle Sobrino, Group Publisher and Chief Revenue Officer, Variety.  “Along with our PMC Vice Chairman and former Variety Publisher, Gerry Byrne, a United States Marine Corps Vietnam veteran who introduced the luncheon, we are proud to recognize this incredible group of people and are grateful for the dedication of those who continue to highlight the unwavering work of our armed forces protecting our great nation.”

The honorees included:

Founder and owner of Carolines on Broadway and founder of the New York Comedy Festival, Caroline Hirsch, who is also a co-founder of Stand Up for Heroes and a board member of The Bob Woodruff Foundation, both of which support injured service members, veterans and their families.

Author of New York Times Bestsellers “The Other Wes Moore” and “The Work”, CEO of the Robin Hood Foundation, creator of monthly “Future City” Radio Series powered by Prudential on Baltimore’s NPR news station WYPR and Army Combat Veteran Wes Moore.

ABC News chief global affairs correspondent and co-anchor of “This Week with George Stephanopoulos”, Martha Raddatz, who also wrote the book “The Long Road Home: A Story of War and Family”, which was turned into a mini-series for National Geographic starring Kate Bosworth and Michael Kelly

Actor/Comedian and star in the upcoming Warner Brother’s war drama 12 Strong, Rob Riggle. Riggle is a retired United States Marine Corps Reserve officer and has worked with multiple veteran organizations.

Mikal Vega, is a retired Naval Special Warfare Operator who spent 22 years as a SEAL and is currently working as a technical director on NBC’s “The Brave”. He is Founder and CEO of the organization Vital Warrior.

“CBS Evening News” anchor Jeff Glor hosted the exclusive luncheon, made up of approximately 150 invite-only guests, comprised of retired and active service members and their families, service contributors, entertainment and media insiders. The United States Marines Corps provided a Color Guard.  At the event, National Geographic showed exclusive footage from their upcoming eight-part documentary series “Chain of Command”, narrated by Chris Evans. The series premiered on Nat Geo on Monday, January 15th.

National Geographic has a rich and trusted legacy of covering stories of war and the impact on people dating back to World War I.  Looking at world events and the impact on people and culture is part of their DNA.  They like to say “Geography” is the study of people over places, and both “The Long Road Home” and “Chain of Command” continue that legacy by showcasing the people, the impact and the culture surrounding important world events.

About Variety
Variety remains the seminal voice of the entertainment industry for 111 years and counting.  Featuring award-winning breaking news reporting, insightful award-season coverage, must-read feature spotlights and intelligent analysis of the industry’s most prominent players, Variety is the trusted source for the business of global entertainment.

Read by a highly engaged audience of industry insiders, Variety’s multi-platform content coverage expands across digital, mobile, social, print and branded events and summits.

In 2015 Variety’s “Actors on Actors” on PBS was awarded the Emmy for best entertainment programming at the Television Academy’s 67th Los Angeles area Emmy Awards. “Actors on Actors,” which is an interview special that features pairings of prominent actors discussing their craft, was produced by PBS SoCal in partnership with Variety Media, LLC. Follow Variety on Facebook facebook.com/variety; Twitter, @variety; Instagram, @Variety; Pintrest and Snapchat. The Variety Group – Variety, Variety.com, Variety Insight, Indiewire, LA 411, NY 411 – is owned by Variety Media, LLC, a division of Penske Media Corporation.

About National Geographic Partners LLC
National Geographic Partners LLC (NGP), a joint venture between National Geographic and 21st Century Fox, is committed to bringing the world premium science, adventure and exploration content across an unrivaled portfolio of media assets. NGP combines the global National Geographic television channels (National Geographic Channel, Nat Geo WILD, Nat Geo MUNDO, Nat Geo PEOPLE) with National Geographic’s media and consumer-oriented assets, including National Geographic magazines; National Geographic studios; related digital and social media platforms; books; maps; children’s media; and ancillary activities that include travel, global experiences and events, archival sales, licensing and e-commerce businesses. Furthering knowledge and understanding of our world has been the core purpose of National Geographic for 128 years, and now we are committed to going deeper, pushing boundaries, going further for our consumers … and reaching over 730 million people around the world in 172 countries and 43 languages every month as we do it. NGP returns 27 percent of our proceeds to the non-profit National Geographic Society to fund work in the areas of science, exploration, conservation and education. For more information visit natgeotv.com or nationalgeographic.com, or find us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+, YouTube, LinkedIn and Pinterest.

About PMC
Penske Media Corporation (PMC) is a leading digital media and information services company whose award-winning content attracts a monthly audience of more than 180 million and empowers more than 1 million global CEOs and business thought-leaders in markets that impact the world. Our dynamic events, data services, and rich content entertain and educate today’s fashion, retail, beauty, entertainment and lifestyle sectors. Headquartered in New York and Los Angeles with additional offices in 11 countries worldwide, Penske Media is the way global influencers are informed, connected, and inspired. To learn more about PMC and its iconic brands, visit www.pmc.com.

 

Sailor Spotlight! Electronics Technician 3rd Class Jacob Otero, from La Mirada, California

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Jacob Otero

Electronics Technician 3rd Class Jacob Otero, assigned to USS Nimitz (CVN 68), greets his wife on the pier after a six-month deployment. The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group is returning from a regularly scheduled deployment to the Western Pacific.

The U.S. Navy has patrolled the Indo-Asia-Pacific region routinely for more than 70 years promoting peace and security. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sierra D. Langdon/Released)

The men and women in U.S. Navy are deployed around the clock and ready to protect and defend America on the world’s oceans.

Source: outreach.navy.mil

Rutgers Graduate Student Pens Memoir of Marine Service in Afghanistan

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Mark A. Bodrog

By Tom McLaughlin

The words read like something out of a well-crafted action thriller. But make no mistake, for 1st Lt. Mark A. Bodrog, the images are still real, the memories still fresh.

“As if the gates of hell had opened up, my Marines and Afghan soldiers started to pick up their rates of fire, sending hundreds of machine gun rounds down range at the enemy compounds,” writes Bodrog in his gripping new memoir, Second Platoon: Call Sign Hades: A Memoir of the Marines of the Combined Action Company. “They opened up with a barrage of 40mm grenades from their grenade launchers and rocked even more compounds with their Light Anti-Tank Weapon rockets.”

A former first lieutenant and infantry officer in the U.S. Marines, the Rutgers–Camden alumnus and graduate student looks back at the critical role his unit played supporting Operation Enduring Freedom 10.1, in the Helmand Province, Afghanistan, in his new book published by iUniverse.

Bodrog’s platoon of Marines and sailors was one of two selected by his battalion to integrate fully with the Afghanistan National Army Soldiers, in order to create a combined action company (CAC) capable of conducting counterinsurgency operations throughout their area of operations and adjacent battle spaces. As he recalls, the two platoons of U.S. Marines lived in a camp side by side with two platoons of Afghan soldiers in a one-to-one ratio.

“We did everything together, including eating, shaving, sleeping, fighting, and even taking classes together,” recalls Bodrog. “We became one fighting force against the Taliban.”

Bodrog’s platoon would carry out a variety of missions, including combat engagements and rescue situations, during the formation of the CAC. He felt that it was his duty and obligation to document the accounts of his men and these missions in order for the general public – along with the families of these Marines – to understand what life was like for these young servicemen in Afghanistan.

As he recalls, much of what he saw reported in the media did not match the reality on the ground, and typically focused on negative aspects of the war, rather than the selfless acts of heroism that he saw on a daily basis.

“My Marines embodied the American dream; they were the hardworking guys that you never read about,” says Bodrog, a longtime resident of Mount Laurel who now resides in Camden. “As a platoon commander, it was my honor, duty, and privilege to write this memoir for my men. They are heroes in every aspect, and their stories should never be forgotten.”

Bodrog is quick to point out that the memoir not only immortalizes his men, but the bold few who, in the wake of 9/11, fought to preserve America and the American way of life, and asked for nothing in return.

MArk A. Bobrog-Afganistan

“The war in Afghanistan is considered to be America’s longest and least talked-about war,” shares Bodrog. “Less than one percent of America’s population answered our country’s call after 9/11 and even fewer made the life choice to become United States Marines.”

Bodrog adds that the memoir also has practical applications for the future of combined action companies. He explains that the counterinsurgency strategy was “designed to win the hearts and minds” of the Afghan people. Combined action programs had been earlier implemented by the Marines during the Vietnam War, which consisted of embedding Marines with local Vietnamese citizens. However, Bodrog says, his battalion took the tactic to the next level by creating a combined company of marines, sailors and Afghan soldiers. He maintains that the U.S. military can now benefit from the stories, training techniques and lessons learned during his battalion’s partnership with the Afghans.

“It was very frustrating, there was a lot of mistrust, and we went through a lot of friction, which I detail in the memoir,” he says. “It was a lot of trial and error, but we learned what worked and what didn’t. If we are ever in that counterinsurgency position again, it might help to save lives.”

Mark A. Bodrog
Mark A. Bodrog

Bodrog earned a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from Rutgers–Camden in 2007. A year later, he was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps in Quantico, Va. He has held the billets of platoon commander, weapons platoon commander, assistant operations officer, executive officer and company commander. He served two combat deployments to the Helmand Province, Afghanistan, with 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment in support of both Operation Enduring Freedom 10.1 and 11.2.

His personal awards include a Letter of Appreciation, a Certificate of Commendation, the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal, the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, the Combat Action Ribbon, the Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, the Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation Medal, the NATO Medal-ISAF Afghanistan, the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, the Navy Unit Commendation, two Afghanistan Campaign Medals, and the National Defense Service Medal.

He saved 6 men at Pearl Harbor. Finally, 76 years later, he’s being honored

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Anyone who heard the story of Joe George at Pearl Harbor knew at once this was the story of a hero: a young sailor who risked his life in the fiery Japanese ambush to rescue the last six survivors from the sinking USS Arizona.

Joe George should get a medal for what he did, everyone would say.

Strangers who heard the story said it. The men he saved said it.

But for more than seven decades, no one could make it happen.

The Navy commended George for his actions and noted them in his record. For a medal, the Navy wanted an eyewitness account of the incident, corroboration from a senior officer who was aboard the USS Vestal with George on Dec. 7, 1941. Neither could be found.

And there was a hitch in the story: George, a boatswain’s mate second class, disobeyed an order to cut the line between the Vestal, a maintenance ship, and the Arizona. He had spotted the six desperate men on the burning battleship and threw a line to them, ignoring the order to cast off.

The failure to follow orders seemed to stand in the way of George’s medal.

George died in 1996. A few years later, the son of one of the men George rescued took up the cause of the medal.

He called. He wrote letters. He enlisted other Pearl Harbor survivors. He tracked down George’s family and promised George’s widow he would fight to secure recognition for the man who had saved his dad’s life.

George’s daughter, Joe Ann Taylor, joined the campaign. They took it all the way to the White House.

And they did it. On Thursday, a Navy admiral will present Taylor a Bronze Star Medal for Valor, recognizing George posthumously. The ceremony will take place aboard the USS Arizona Memorial in Pearl Harbor, yards from where the story began.

And though George has died, the story continues. His efforts saved six men that day. Now, improbably — 76 years later — of the five USS Arizona survivors still alive, two of them are men George saved.

Continue onto USA Today to read more about this brave soldier.