The Troops to Teachers Program

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Consider teaching as a career after your military service

You know that scientists discovered Pluto in 1930. You know that it’s no longer the ninth planet and it is now considered a dwarf planet. You have so much knowledge; why not share it with kids who need it? The skills you honed in the military—leadership, initiative, discipline, integrity and the ability to thrive in an ever-changing environment—are a natural fit for the classroom. Troops to Teachers, a military career transition program, helps transitioning service members begin new careers as public school teachers.

It’s never too early to think about your life after separation and start exploring your options. Your next life-changing mission could be to become a teacher. Many service members transitioning to a civilian career find their skills naturally transfer to a career in teaching.

Troops to Teachers can help you identify your best path to teaching by providing counseling, guidance and help with meeting education requirements. You’re eligible for the program if you’re a member of the U.S. Armed Forces or were honorably discharged Troops to Teachers career resources include:

Counseling and referral assistance. This service provides guidance on teacher certification and education requirements and leads on employment opportunities.

Financial assistance. The program’s financial help can pay for your education and licensure requirements. There are also bonuses to encourage you to teach in certain types of schools or in a specific part of the country, and also for teaching subjects that are in demand, such as science, math or foreign languages. Time restrictions for registration and other requirements are involved, so contact a Troops to Teachers state or regional coordinator for more information.

Registration. Contact your installation education office for more information on registering for Troops to Teachers, or visit the Troops to Teachers website.

Source:  www.militaryonesource.mil

Practical Resume Advice for Military Veterans

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Man holding a sign that says "Sell Your Skills"

Switching careers takes courage. And veterans know a thing or two about courage. But when military personnel finish serving their country and look to re-enter civilian life, they need more than just strong nerves to make the transition to a new career. Finding a job demands practical strategies.

For veterans, the struggle is often aligning the skills and experiences they’ve gained in the military with the types of jobs that exist outside the military. On top of that, long-serving veterans don’t have a lot of experience with resume making.

Not to worry. This post is all about helping those that have served in the armed forces create resumes as they seek out civilian positions.

We love bringing insights from job recruiters into the products and resources we offer. So, after talking with recruiters about their experiences hiring veterans, we’ve focused this post on the following areas:

Keep in mind that there are plenty of other considerations when making a resume. So be sure to also see our guide on how to build a resume in 2019.

Best resume format for military veterans

There are three different resume formats that are typically used for resumes. For veterans, the most suitable choice is what is called a “functional” or “skills-based” resume format.

Why this? Well the logic behind the functional format is that it gives greater attention to the skills a person has developed. This stands in contrast to the “reverse chronological” resume format, which offers more space for a person to outline a long employment history in order to demonstrate career progression.

Many veterans have spent much of their working life in the military, so their employment history is really one employer – even if they have progressed through different roles or ranks.

That being the case, listing all the positions and responsibilities over a military career often isn’t the best strategy for persuading recruiters in the public or private sector.

This is because recruiters often aren’t familiar with the types of work military personnel undertake, and therefore may not see the applicability of military experience.

To avoid this problem, veterans should focus less on describing their former roles/responsibilities, and instead focus on highlighting the skills they have gained that are directly relevant to the position they are seeking.

Sample of a Military to Civilian Resume

military veteran resume example

Continue on to Novoresume.com to begin building your resume!

Husband & Wife – Both Military Vets – Launch #1 Mobile Flooring Brand Together

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Lorrie, Lewis Willey stand posing in front of their Floor Coverings van in Colorado Springs, CO

When you are thrown a few curveballs in your working career, you sometimes have to take control of your own destiny, and that’s just what Lewis and Lorrie Willey did when they each decided to leave their jobs and make the most of their new life in Colorado Springs by becoming franchisees with Floor Coverings International, whose representatives visit customers’ homes in a Mobile Flooring Showroom stocked with thousands of flooring samples from top manufacturers.

Both Lewis (U.S. Air Force) and Lorrie (U.S. Army) are veterans. Although the couple had spent many years living in Amarillo, Texas, Lewis had always said he would like to retire to Colorado Springs after having been stationed at the Air Force Academy and the couple frequently vacationed in the area. Working as a dialysis nurse, Lewis had the opportunity to relocate to Colorado Springs in 2017. They moved that fall and Lorrie had hoped to continue her executive career with a large insurance company by working remotely from Colorado Springs, but she “retired” after being unable to do so.

Complicating matters even more after their relocation, Lewis was asked to work at a clinic in Alamosa – a three-hour drive from Colorado Springs – several days each week. “He would drive down on Monday and drive back Wednesday or Thursday,” Lorrie said. “It was not what we had in mind when we moved to Colorado and it did not fit our lifestyle ideas. We started looking for other opportunities and got connected with a franchise broker. He showed us what a franchise could do for us in terms of working together to build a future in preparation for retirement down the road.”

Now the couple couldn’t be happier. Lewis had previous experience as a property claims adjuster and he’s been putting those skills to work as a Design Associate, visiting customers’ homes and advising them on appropriate flooring types for their needs. “His knowledge of housing materials, measuring and estimating made him a great fit for that role,” said Lorrie, who will be overseeing the office manager and project coordinator, as well as building community relationships and the Floor Coverings International brand.

In Floor Coverings International, the Willeys found a company that has tripled in size since 2005 by putting a laser focus on consumer buying habits and expressed desires, its impressive operating model, growth ability, marketing, advertising and merchandising. Floor Coverings International further separates itself from the competition through its customer experience, made up of several simple and integrated steps that exceed customers’ expectations. Floor Coverings International also has a very strong commitment to community involvement, led by CEO Tom Wood.

“We assessed six different business models and decided that Floor Coverings International had the best business model, the best match for us in terms of utilizing our existing skill sets, and enough moving parts to really challenge us,” Lorrie said. “We also identified closely with their moral code of ethics, their customer service model and their community involvement with Ronald McDonald House, Habitat for Humanity and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.”

ABOUT FLOOR COVERINGS INTERNATIONAL

Floor Coverings International is the #1 Mobile Flooring Franchise in North America. Utilizing a unique in-home experience, the mobile showroom comes directly to the customer’s door with more than 3,000 flooring choices. Floor Coverings International has 150-plus locations throughout the U.S. and Canada with plenty of opportunity for continued expansion in 2019. For franchise information, please visit flooring-franchise.com and to find your closest location, floorcoveringsinternational.com.

How Wharton’s EMBA Program Adds Value for Military Students

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Three uniformed U.S. soldiers standing outside Army helicopter

The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania helps students accelerate their careers, whether they are staying in the military, planning a future transition, or working in the private sector through its MBA Program for Executives.

The program delivers the “undiluted Wharton MBA to working professionals,” with programs in both Philadelphia and San Francisco that work around a full-time work schedule and offer many benefits for military and veteran students.

Application Fee Waiver and Financial Aid

As a small token of our appreciation, we waive the application fee for all U.S. military applicants. To request a waiver, contact the admissions team of the program to which you’re applying before submitting your application.

Also, if you qualify for all military financial aid programs, it is possible to bring your total out-of-pocket expenses for this program to less than $12,000. We’ve included some resources for additional information about financial aid below.

GI Bill

Both active duty service members and veterans are eligible for the Post-9/11 GI Bill. The GI Bill amount is $23,671.94 per year for the 2018–19 academic year. This amount generally increases by a small percentage every year so check the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs website at gibill.va.gov for the most up-to-date information.

The VA defines the academic year as August 1–July 31. Because our program starts in May every year, our students qualify for three payments of up to $23,671.94 (up to $68,416), based on eligibility percentage as determined by the military.

Yellow Ribbon Program

In addition to the Post-9/11 GI Bill, veterans who are eligible for 100 percent of the GI Bill and retired at the start of the summer term can qualify for the Yellow Ribbon Program. Wharton has an unlimited number of Yellow Ribbon spots for the full-time and executive MBA Program. The Yellow Ribbon Program awards $12,500 per fall and spring semesters, for a total of $50,000.

Applying for the Yellow Ribbon Program is not difficult—once accepted, students submit their certificate of eligibility to the Student Financial Services Office (executivemba.wharton.upenn.edu/emba-tuition-financial-aid/).

Basic Allowance for Housing

To calculate your estimated benefits, enter your own personal information using the GI Bill Comparison Tool at va.gov/gi-bill-comparison-tool/.

Additional Financial Aid Resources

Military students may qualify for additional scholarships, including the FRA Education Foundation and AT&T Veterans. Wharton’s EMBA program also awards a few merit-based scholarships each year. These scholarships are based on the individual applicant and the applicant pool. Consideration is automatic, and awards are granted as part of the admissions offer.

Wharton’s Military Network

We recognize that our military applicants are faced with unique circumstances and we welcome the opportunity to assist you in any way possible. We have a very tight network of military students, and we would be happy to connect you up with any of them so that they can share their personal perspectives and experiences.

Wharton Veterans Club

The Wharton Veterans Club is committed to assisting transitioning service members and veterans who are interested in pursuing an MBA. There are more than 80 veterans and active military members in the club, and they take great pride in their military service and are extremely proud to be a part of the Wharton community.

They host Wharton MBA military visit days throughout the year, provide support and mentorship through the application process, and connect applicants with military alumni.

Wharton Stories

Rebecca Bennett

Test Pilot, U.S. Navy

EMBA, 2019, Wharton Philadelphia campus

Prior education: Cornell University, B.S., chemical engineering

Military experience: “I joined the Navy in college to be part of something bigger than myself and to Rebecca Bennett standing next to army helicopterserve my country. I’ve always done things that challenge me because I believe you grow when you go outside your comfort zone, so I chose to become a pilot and headed to flight school. I opted to fly helicopters because I was passionate about the helicopter missions, which often involve hurricane relief and search and rescue, and I wanted to fly with a crew. I did a few deployments around the world, and then I was selected and attended the U.S Naval Test Pilot School. Now, I work as a test pilot where my job is to help develop and test new technology and equipment for Navy helicopters before those products are deployed to helicopter units around the world.”

Getting an MBA: “When my commitment to the military is up in the summer of 2019, I plan to separate from the military and get into business. I believe companies have incredible opportunities to tackle some of the problems facing society today, and I want to be on the leading-edge of the technologies being developed to solve those problems. I want an MBA to learn how to leverage my military background and gain new business knowledge to transition into the private sector.”

Military students: “One of the great things about this program is that it brings people with all sorts of backgrounds together. Even so, sometimes I find there can be a stark divide between veterans and civilians – we speak a different language and it’s sometimes hard for each side to understand what the other does for their job. This program has helped me bridge that divide. It has also allowed me to better understand my opportunities in the private sector as well as explain how my military background adds value.”

Value of Wharton for military students: “The Wharton network is an incredible benefit. I’ve sent cold emails to alumni with an almost 100% response rate. Alumni are willing to get on the phone and talk about their jobs, which is something I didn’t expect when I came here. I’ve also learned a lot from my fellow classmates. And, of course, the academics are phenomenal. I am getting the business knowledge necessary to make a smooth transition to the private sector.”

Military benefits: “I used the application fee waiver for military students and the GI Bill.”

Chris Robinson

F/A-18 Instructor Pilot, U.S. Marine Corps

Position after graduation: Investment Banker, Goldman Sachs

EMBA, 2019, Wharton San Francisco campus

Prior education: Boston College, B.A., economics and political science

Chris Robinson standing outside with his familyMilitary experience: “I joined the Marines as an undergraduate student to serve something greater than myself. I served on two deployments, including one to the Western Pacific and one to the Middle East. More recently, I’ve served as an instructor pilot teaching newly winged aviators to fly the F/A-18. This year, I’m transitioning off active duty to the Reserves and will continue to serve as a flight instructor.”

Getting an MBA: “I knew I would be transitioning out of the military to the private sector and getting an MBA was a way to accelerate that transition. I wanted to gain high-level, relevant knowledge about different facets of business and learn alongside an experienced cohort from different industries. I needed a program for executives because as a full-time active duty officer with four kids, going back to school full-time was not an option. I explored some other EMBA programs, but they didn’t compare to Wharton.”

Military students: “Coming from the military, I wasn’t aware of all of the opportunities the private sector has to offer or the paths to those careers. This program has a dedicated career director, who also has military experience, who provides one-on-one career coaching and is a great resource for students wanting to make a transition. After graduation, I will be joining Goldman Sachs.” [Wharton EMBA career directors are Steve Hernandez in San Francisco and Dr. Dawn Graham in Philadelphia.]

Value of Wharton for military students: “Military students bring such intangible leadership qualities as having presence in a room and being able to cut through things quickly, which is valued in team settings. We also are good at time management. I’m always the guy who wants to begin meetings on time. On the other hand, we also tend to speak more bluntly. My peers have helped coach me about cultural norms in the private sector, which has served me well as I go through my transition process.”

Military benefits: “I used the application fee waiver for military students and the GI Bill. As I transition off active duty, I plan to use the Yellow Ribbon Program and the part of the GI Bill that provides a Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH). I also received some scholarship funds from Wharton.”

Marty Pendleton

Management Consulting Manager, Accenture

Previously U.S. Navy Surface Warfare Officer

EMBA, 2020, Wharton Philadelphia campus

Prior education: Vanderbilt University, B.S., communication studies

Military experience: “After college, I served in the U.S. Navy for five years because I wanted to giveMarty Pendleton standing outside in full dress uniform back and do something service oriented. After getting out of the military, I wanted to continue working to support our defense and intelligence communities. I did that through consulting and joined Accenture’s federal practice. I work with law enforcement, intelligence and defense agencies to improve technology and processes. My service to the country is continuing, but I have a broader impact in this role and it is very rewarding.”

Getting an MBA: “I wanted to continue learning about business, and sometimes you have to step away from your day-to-day and learn in a classroom surrounded by people doing different things. I learn a lot from my classmates and the professors – more than I could learn on the job.”

Military students: “We bring a unique perspective to the classroom because we have led teams, often under life and death circumstances. Those high stakes teach a person how to filter out the noise in decision-making and how to focus on what really matters. One critical factor is building and empowering a team you trust.”

Value of Wharton for military students: “Military people have great leadership experience that makes us good generalists, but we tend to come out of the service with knowledge gaps. While we know how to lead teams, we may not know how to read a balance sheet or build a marketing plan. Wharton helps us develop these skills, while also broadening our network outside of the military.”

Military benefits: “I used the application fee waiver for military students, the Yellow Ribbon Program, and the GI Bill.”

Craig Replogle

Manager, Strategic Account Operations, Nike and Navy SEAL Commander, U.S. Navy Reserve

Previously U.S. Navy SEAL

EMBA, 2015, Wharton San Francisco campus

Prior education: U.S. Naval Academy, B.S., ocean engineering

Craig Replogle in uniform outside kneeling on one knoee holding his son with his two other children on either sideMilitary experience: “I grew up watching Top Gun and went to the Naval Academy to be a fighter pilot, but eventually discovered the SEAL Teams. During my senior year, 9/11 occurred and that had a big impact on my trajectory. I was fortunate to earn an opportunity to enter the Navy SEAL selection and training program and even more fortunate to make it through the arduous program. I then went on to spend the next decade as a SEAL officer, deploying overseas six times. I transitioned off active duty in the Wharton EMBA program and continue to serve in the Navy Reserves while growing my new career at Nike.”

Getting an MBA: “Towards the end of my time on active duty, I decided I wanted to be home more for my wife and kids. I decided to take advantage of the GI Bill to get my MBA and help transition to the private sector. In the Navy, the things that mattered most to me were the amazing people I worked with, the impact of culture on an organization, and the ability to maintain an active lifestyle. At Wharton, I explored possible career paths with those factors in mind. Wharton EMBA Career Director Steve Hernandez coached me as I narrowed my search to various sports and outdoor companies. When I dove into the deep end to pursue a career at Nike, both the veterans’ and Wharton networks were instrumental in helping me land a role at the Swoosh.”

Military students: “We bring a different leadership experience having led teams in high-risk critical situations. As a result, we know that every midterm and final is just one piece of the entire puzzle. It’s important, but no one’s life is on the line. We have a unique perspective on the big picture, which can be helpful for our classmates, because we know the stakes are less in the classroom than they are on the battlefield.”

Value of Wharton for military students: “This program helps shore up any lack of business experience for military students. The knowledge, brand, and network from Wharton are priceless. Employers know you have a solid business foundation and understanding of the levers that are pivotal to a company. Just as important, you learn from and how to work with your classmates who come from a variety of backgrounds outside of the military. They are your first and most important network you’ll grow outside of the military.”

Military benefits: “I used the application fee waiver for military students and the GI Bill. In my second year, I used the Yellow Ribbon Program and Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH).”

Source: executivemba.wharton.upenn.edu

How to Hire Veterans

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Woman shaking hands with recruiter

There are more than 21 million veterans of the U.S. armed forces, and many of these veterans have been trained on general as well as technical skills in their military careers.

From food service to technical support, the armed forces impart a great many skills on veterans, and employers reap the benefits of this training when they hire veterans.

Veterans are also very team oriented and have years of experience cooperating with their peers to meet objectives set by team leaders.

This article answers these questions and others you may have when you hire a veteran:

  • How do I hire veterans?
  • Where can I hire veterans?
  • Where do I post jobs to hire veterans?
  • How to find veterans to hire?
  • What are the benefits of hiring veterans?

 

Benefits of Hiring Veterans

While the main thought of many employers is “I want to hire a veteran,” other employers may be wondering more about the benefits of hiring a veteran.

We’ve talked about some of the benefits of hiring veterans, like experience working in teams, but there are hard cost benefits to hiring veterans, other than the experience that veterans have.

Here some of the most tangible benefits of hiring veterans:

  • Employers can get a tax credit of $5,600 for hiring eligible veterans and a $9,600 tax credit for hiring disabled veterans.
  • Veterans are trained on specific technical skills by the armed forces.
  • Veterans are trained in hundreds of general tasks while in the armed forces.
  • Veterans are trained to work cooperatively with their team and are loyal to these teams.
  • Veterans are able to receive support from their government in their education, reducing the cost of any continued education benefits your company offers.
  • Veterans are trained to use effective leadership techniques.

 

How to Find Veterans to Hire

When it comes to hiring veterans, many employers feel like they are in a situation like this:

“I want to hire a veteran, but I don’t know how to find veterans to hire or how to hire a vet.”

If you are wondering where to hire veterans, there are many resources offered to veterans to help them find jobs after they transition out of working for the armed forces.

Where to Post Jobs for Veterans

By advertising open positions on veteran-specific job boards, you can reach thousands of veterans in your area.

You can also use your Glassdoor Employer Profile to feature your commitment to hiring veterans badge, pro-veteran messaging, fun pictures of your employees and reviews from current and former veteran employees.

Another way to find veterans to hire is by using your company’s social media profiles to post about how you are a “veteran friendly employer.” You can also use pro-veteran hiring hashtags along with #jobs or #hiring, such as #vets, #veterans or #SOV (support our veterans) when posting links to your job descriptions on social media.

You can also contact local veteran support organizations and tell them that you are a veteran-friendly business. This way, you can generate local interest in your job opportunities and get a large, skilled demographic in your area engaged in working for your company.

How to Hire a Veteran

Hiring veterans is no different from hiring any other employee. Their time in the armed forces should be viewed like any other job on a resume, and interviewing them about this experience should be focused on exploring the skills they gained in this period.

When reviewing a veteran applicant’s experience, you can ask questions like these about the applicable skills they learned in the armed forces:

  • What technical skills were you trained in that you will use in this job?
  • How many years have you been using these skills?
  • Which soft skills did you learn in the armed forces that will help you do well in this job?
  • What other experience did you gain in the armed forces that will help you succeed in this job?

Their other professional experience should be covered as well, but don’t be intimidated when going over their time in the armed forces.

They gained an immense amount of experience in the armed forces, and to determine that they are a good hire, you will need to explore the professional experience and skills they developed.

Source: www.glassdoor.com

Looking for a STEM Job? Head to These States

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army woman sitting at desk in a wheelchair smiling in to camera

Milken Institute’s 2018 State Technology and Science Index, a biennial assessment of states’ capabilities and competitiveness in a tech-focused economy, ranked the top ten states to pursue a STEM career.

  1. Massachusetts
  2. Colorado
  3. Maryland
  4. California
  5. Utah
  6. Washington
  7. Delaware
  8. Minnesota
  9. New Hampshire
  10. Oregon

“The success stories of states profiled in this year’s index reflect sustained efforts to not only build but to maintain their ecosystem,” said Kevin Klowden, executive director of the Milken Institute Center for Regional Economics. “Making the changes that are necessary to perform well on the State Technology and Science Index can contribute to stronger long-term economic performance.”

Massachusetts benefitted from the presence of major research universities, the availability of venture capital, entrepreneurial expertise, and a tech-oriented workforce, according to the report. The state was first in three of the index’s five composite indexes and finished third in another. Massachusetts continues to strengthen its position in tech and science by increasing public funding of neuroscience research, cybersecurity innovation, and startup development.

Utah’s move to fifth was driven by tech-sector employment growth – the fastest in the nation – averaging 4.3 percent annually. The state also had the most university graduates with degrees in science and engineering – 15.4 per 1,000 students. Utah stood out for the success of its universities in spinning research into commercial ventures.

Delaware rose to seventh from tenth, strengthened by an increase in venture capital invested in technology companies. The Legislature authorized a 25 percent tax credit for small companies (those with fewer than 25 employees) engaged in research and development in specific high-tech fields. The state ranks fifth in the number of business startups with 53.4 per 1,000 residents.

The State Technology and Science Index provides a benchmark for policymakers to evaluate their state’s capabilities and formulate strategies for improving STEM education, attracting businesses, and creating jobs in the tech sector. Indices considered in the report include the number of patents issued and doctoral degrees granted in each state.

“Investing in human capital and developing a STEM workforce is crucial for regional economies that want to attract large technology companies and the jobs they bring,” explains Minoli Ratnatunga, Milken Institute’s director of regional economics research.

In addition to the index, the report offers case studies that examine issues such as non-compete contracts that limit employee mobility, along with access to higher education in building a vibrant, adaptable workforce.

Drawing on this data, the report recommends four steps policymakers can take to improve their state’s competitiveness:

Increase scholarships and other financial aid to lower the cost of higher education for in-state students who plan STEM careers.

Better align STEM curriculums to make it easier for students to transfer credits from lower-cost two-year colleges to four-year institutions.

Encourage partnerships between higher-education institutions and private companies to provide students with work experience to improve workforce readiness and job placement.

Make employee noncompete laws less restrictive to encourage a freer exchange of ideas and talent among tech companies.

The index draws on data from government and private sources dating from 2015 to 2017, including the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the National Science Foundation, the Small Business Administration, the American Community Survey, and Moody’s Analytics.

Source: milkeninstitute.org

Working With A New Canvas, Air Force Vet Confident, Excited About Transferring Skill Set

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Nick and MelissaMurray pose outside in their franchsie outfits

(CHATTANOOGA, Tennessee)—Nick Murray is transitioning from a military officer to a civilian and small-business owner.

But thanks to his experience and attitude, it has all worked like clockwork and with nary a worry, with the biggest benefactors being the clients of Murray’s CertaPro Painters franchise, which launched in 2018 and serves customers throughout the greater Chattanooga metropolitan area.

CertaPro Painters is America’s largest and most-referred painting company. “In an industry that typically lacks exceptional customer service and involves production management, it sounded like a great challenge to me,” said the four-year veteran of the United States Air Force.

The 28-year-old Murray performed contracting duties in the United Kingdom, Iceland and here at home during his Air Force career, purchasing commodities, services and construction while adhering to all federal regulations and initiatives. That discipline, Murray believes, gives him an edge in being a small-business owner with CertaPro Painters, whose best-in-class operational systems and procedures make it the most professional business model in the industry and its satisfied customers are the direct benefactors.

“Military experience has enhanced my ability to execute at a high level while providing a strong foundation for the contracting industry,” Murray said. Murray met his wife, Melissa, who assists in the business, when they were both in ROTC at the University of Kentucky. While the couple was stationed at Robins Air Force Base in Georgia for two years, they made a few visits to Chattanooga and liked what they saw, especially since it meant being closer to family. “We decided Chattanooga was where we wanted to start our family and our next chapter,” Murray said. “I was confident in my contracting abilities and enthusiastic about the opportunity, so with Melissa’s support, we decided to join the team and purchase the CertaPro franchise here in Chattanooga.”

Commercial and residential painting is an estimated $60 billion industry in the U.S. and Canada. CertaPro has been consistently ranked No. 1 by Entrepreneur magazine in its category and boasts a customer referral rate that exceeds 95 percent.

About CertaPro Painters
Founded in 1992, Audubon, Pennsylvania-based CertaPro Painters is the largest painting company in North America. With more than 350 independently owned and operated franchises worldwide, CertaPro provides a customer-driven painting experience for both residential and commercial properties that is unparalleled in the industry. The company’s stellar service and proven business system have made CertaPro North America’s most referred painting company. For more information, visit www.certapro.com

A Salute To Paul Davis Restoration Franchisee And Marine, Chris Waddell

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Chris Waddell walking out of his mobile restoration unit

Paul Davis Restoration salutes Chris Waddell, Marine Corp. veteran and owner of Paul Davis of Northwest Kentucky located at 1030 Amiet Road in Henderson.

Prior to becoming a franchisee, Waddell was the operations manager for the Paul Davis office in Evansville, Indiana. He began his restoration career as a water mitigation technician in 1998 after his honorable discharge from the Marine Corp.

“My father worked for the company’s Louisville office during the 1980s before becoming a franchisee himself in 1985,” he said. “I’ve been around Paul Davis and its great business model since about the age of seven, “Waddell laughed. “I helped when I could and accompanied my Dad to work sometimes as a kid so it seemed a natural fit to work for him at his Evansville office after my military service.  I developed the water mitigation program there and was the lead water technician for nearly 10 years before moving into an associate position.”

Waddell and Paul Davis team members hold a myriad of certifications from The Institute of Inspection, Cleaning, Restoration and Certification (IICRC) and many other qualifications in the restoration industry.

Paul Davis is a leading provider of fire, water, mold, and storm damage restoration, reconstruction and remodeling services along with large loss response and contents cleaning for residential and commercial properties.

Visit at https://northwest-kentucky.pauldavis.com/.

About Paul Davis Restoration

For more than 50 years, Paul Davis Restorations Inc. has restored residential and commercial properties damaged by fire, water, mold, storms and disasters. The experts at Paul Davis understand the complex process of recovering from property damage and provide complete services; there is no need for the expense and confusion of hiring multiple contractors. Paul Davis is a one-stop shop for disaster damage and restoration. Paul Davis Restoration has more than 300 independently owned franchises in the United States and Canada. The professionals at Paul Davis are certified in emergency restoration, reconstruction and remodeling. For more information, visit the company website at www.pauldavis.com.

After Winning Medals In Afghanistan, Veteran Brings Number One Home Inspection Company To Pasadena, CA

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Spencer Velez poses in uniform) in a military vehicle

Spencer Velez knows how to use his expertise and skills. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps for 14 years. The now 35-year-old deployed to Afghanistan in 2011 as a part of Operation Enduring Freedom and was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal for superior performance of duties while serving in a direct combat service support role.

As if those achievements weren’t enough, Velez then completed graduate school at the University of Southern California (USC) earning a Master of Business for Veterans (MBV) degree in a program designed to leverage the management and leadership experience gained during military service.

While attending graduate school, he applied these skills to his role in Corporate Compliance with The Walt Disney Company. In that role, he ensured wherever Disney products were manufactured, the workers were provided a safe and inclusive environment.

In May, he added a Pillar To Post Home Inspectors® franchise to round out his business skills. Velez will serve homebuyers and sellers throughout Pasadena, South Pasadena, San Marino, Alhambra, Altadena, La Cañada Flintridge, Glendale, Burbank, Sierra Madre, Arcadia, Rosemead, Monterey Park, Los Angeles and surrounding areas.

Spencer Valez smiling in headshot
Spencer Valez, Pillar to Post Home Inspectors

The brand is a favorite among veterans such as Velez. Pillar To Post Home Inspectors is a member of VetFran, a program of the International Franchise Association that helps vets purchase franchises and it has achieved 5-star status in that program, the top ranking possible. In 2018, one-third of new Pillar To Post Home Inspectors franchisees were military vets. “Pillar to Post provides a service that brings people happiness and positively impacts the community by educating the client about the home – purchasing a home is a big and exciting step and we are a part of that journey,” said Velez. “I have great plans to grow the business to its maximum potential with multiple professional home inspectors and valuable services. I will be a leader built on a reputation of respect and hard work which I learned through my military service.”

Pillar To Post Home Inspectors, is the brand to which more than three million families have turned to for 25 years to be their trusted advisor when buying or selling a home. Consistently ranked as the top-rated home inspection company on Entrepreneur Magazine’s annual Franchise500®, Pillar To Post Home Inspectors is enjoying its 19th year in a row on that list.

A professional evaluation both inside and outside the home is at the core of Pillar To Post Home Inspectors’ service. Pillar To Post Home Inspectors input data and digital photos into a computerized report that is printed and presented on site. All information is provided to clients in a customized binder for easy reference, allowing homebuyers or sellers to make confident, informed decisions.

About Pillar To Post Home Inspectors®
Founded in 1994, Pillar To Post Home Inspectors is the largest home inspection company in North America with home offices in Toronto and Tampa. There are nearly 600 franchises located in 49 states and nine Canadian provinces. The company has been named as Best in Category in Entrepreneur Magazine’s Franchise500® ranking for 19 years in a row. Long-term plans include adding 500 to 600 new franchisees over the next five years. For further information, please visit pillartopostfranchise.com.

What Are ‘New-Collar’ Jobs?

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Cropped shot of a group of business colleagues meeting in the boardroom

By Jess Scherman

In the past, American jobs have generally been classified into one of two categories: white collar and blue collar. The former typically includes jobs performed in an office setting by highly skilled and formally trained professionals, while the latter generally refers to labor jobs that often require professionals to work with their hands.

Today’s workforce, however, is chock-full of job opportunities that don’t necessarily require a bachelor’s degree but do call for a highly specialized skill set. It was in response to this widening need that Ginni Rometty, president and CEO of IBM, coined the term “new-collar” jobs.

As national focus on this developing sector of the workforce increases, we’re digging into the definition of new-collar jobs to uncover how they can impact entire industries.

Join us as we explore our findings and look into several examples of new-collar jobs you might come across in today’s labor force.

What are New-Collar Jobs?

Rometty has defined her coined phrase as including jobs that may not require a traditional college degree. In doing so, she hopes to help entire industries acknowledge a shift that needs to occur amidst hiring managers to look beyond the four-year degree and focus instead on a candidate’s relevant skills—particularly when obtained through valuable hands-on experience.

That being said, there’s no set-in-stone definition of the term or master list of jobs that fit the bill. Generally speaking, new-collar jobs are defined as skilled positions that don’t require a bachelor’s degree and often require some degree of technological know-how.

7 New-Collar Jobs to Consider

Many new-collar jobs can be found in the fields of healthcare and technology, and many of these positions offer respectable compensation levels. They’re also among some of the most in-demand jobs in today’s market.

Whether you’re looking to enter the workforce for the first time, you’re hoping to transition back to the workplace after taking some time off or you’ve been eager to change your career path, there are plenty of promising opportunities with new-collar jobs. Consider the following examples.

1 Pharmacy technician

Professionals who pursue a career as a pharmacy technician are able to enjoy the numerous benefits of working in the medical field without having to spend a handful of years immersed in formal medical training. So what do they do? In simple terms, pharmacy technicians work under the supervision of a pharmacist to prepare medications for customers.

Typical duties include measuring, mixing, counting, labeling and recording dosages of medications from prescription orders in addition to some basic clerical work like obtaining patient information, data entry and filing.

2 Cyber security analyst

With an increasing amount of valuable data being stored online, it should come as no surprise that information security has become a hiring focal point for many organizations—in fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects employment of information security analysts to grow 28 percent by 2026.* Cyber security is one area of new-collar expertise that is so in-demand that Congress has actually considered passing a bill that would grant tax credits to employers who pay for workers to receive specialized training in it—though that bill still has a ways to go before becoming law.

Political wrangling aside, working as a cyber security analyst requires a wealth of hands-on experience with common security technologies and a working knowledge of networking services, protocols and design principles. These tech pros are responsible for designing and developing security architectures and frameworks within dynamic and adaptive online environments.

3 Physical therapist assistant

As a physical therapist assistant, you would team up with physical therapists to help patients regain their full range of motion after an injury or when an illness provides temporary setbacks. This is an ideal career path for those who want to get out from behind a desk and be able to directly observe the ways your work can impact the lives of others.

Physical therapist assistants spend a lot of time working one-on-one with patients, observing their progress and showing them new stretches and exercises to help get them functioning at their peak levels. In addition to working to help patients regain typical range of motion, these medical professionals can contribute to the design of a patient’s treatment plan and provide any necessary education to patients and their families.

4 Web developer

As you may have assumed, web developers specialize in building websites, but their duties span much further that. These tech pros are tasked with analyzing user needs to ensure the right content, graphics and underlying structure is used to both meet the goals of the user and the goals of the website owner.

Typical duties of a web developer include using authoring or scripting languages to build websites; writing, designing and editing web page content, or delegating others to do so; identifying and correcting problems uncovered by user testing and converting written, graphic, audio and video components to compatible web formats.

5 Medical assistant

Professionals in patient care, medical assistants can work in a wide range of settings, from large hospitals to ambulatory care. They work under the direction of a supervising physician as they perform various administrative and clinical tasks. Administrative duties include updating patient records, scheduling appointments and navigating billing and insurance.

The clinical aspects of the medical assistant job include assisting the physician in taking and recording patients’ vital signs, explaining procedures to patients and their loved ones, administering medications, drawing blood, sterilizing equipment and conducting a variety of tests in the lab.

6 Radiologic technologist

With millions of baby boomers reaching retirement age and additionally needing more medical care, it’s no surprise technical medical support roles are in-demand. One of the key components to medical care, diagnostic imaging, is performed in part by radiologic technologists—a career that fits the “new-collar” label very well. Radiologic technologists are healthcare professionals who use specialized equipment to create X-ray images or mammograms that help doctors diagnose ailments and determine treatment options.

7 Computer user support specialist

We live in a digital world—practically every business and organization relies on a host of computers, networks and devices to keep things running smoothly. While most people do a good job of using this technology for their specific jobs, things get a bit dicey when the technology they use isn’t working as intended. That’s where computer user support specialists come in.

Computer user support specialists, often called help desk specialists, are the tech professionals who work directly with users to ensure their devices are working properly. They troubleshoot issues, install and remove hardware and software and perform regular maintenance to keep computer networks up and running.

Could a New-Collar Job be Your Dream Career?

New-collar jobs present a bevy of new opportunities for American workers of all ages who don’t have four-year college degrees. If you’re looking for your chance to enter into a new field, these careers may be an excellent starting point to consider.

Source: rasmussen.edu/student-experience/college-life/new-collar-jobs/

About Rasmussen College

Rasmussen College is a regionally accredited private college that is dedicated to changing lives and the communities it serves through high-demand and flexible educational programs. Since 1900, the College has been committed to academic innovation and empowering students to pursue a college degree. Rasmussen College offers certificate and diploma programs through associate’s, bachelor’s and master’s degrees in seven schools of study including business, health sciences, nursing, technology, design, education and justice studies.

University of Wisconsin Online: Veteran to Versatile IT Professional

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University of Wisconsin Online–Veteran-to-Versatile-IT- Professional

Searching for your post-military career? Launch into a computer science profession and gain in-demand skills such as programming, database management, and computer security with the University of Wisconsin 100% online Applied Computing bachelor’s degree.

Whether you have tech experience from your military service or you’re interested in discovering a new future in the computer science field, the UW Applied Computing degree will set you up for success as a versatile IT professional.

“The University of Wisconsin Bachelor of Science in Applied Computing is a well-balanced IT education that prepares graduates for success in any industry. The curriculum teaches a wide range of technologies that enable them to interact effectively across an organization, not just serve a niche role.” – Jeff Thomas, Chief Technology Officer, Forward Health Group

The UW Applied Computing program means business. Literally. As a student in this program, you’ll complete a variety of technical and business courses that cover IT fundamentals that today’s employers value.

Upon graduating you’ll gain:

  • Experience and knowledge in software design and development, database management, systems analysis and design, and object-oriented programming
  • Business skills in communication, budgeting, project management, team-building, and leadership
  • UW bachelor’s degree employers respect

University of Wisconsin institutions are among the most recognized public universities in the nation, and as an online student, you’ll earn the same degree as on-campus students.

Learn about the veteran’s benefits that may be available to you through the veteran benefits coordinator on your selected University of Wisconsin home campus.

Discover where tech can take your career.

For information on tuition, courses, and careers get the UW Applied Computing degree guide.